Jesus Ninja / Skoob Book's First Review.

Someone gave us a three star for our first review. I do disagree with his reasoning behind it, as I'm not a big fan of college teachings on Biblical studies. I would suggest this person read the books of Gail Riplinger as I have. I don't think our book ever suggested "all" Judeans wanted Jesus killed. But here is what they said and at least someone bought one Skoob, it might actually pickup one day. I anyway think it's a great book and great read for children. Here is the review:

This is an interesting book but I am taking a course on mis-translations in the gospels and I think perhaps a slight change in one small portion of the book might be better.
According to the Gospels, most Jews – and most Judeans – strongly supported Jesus/Yeshua of Nazareth, while a tiny minority wanted him killed. Losing sight of this fact, later editors and translators often produced texts that made readers think instead that the entire Jewish people had murdered this “powerful prophet” (Luke 24:19). The claim that “the Jews killed Christ” then fed into anti Jewish hatred and violence across the globe for many centuries. In this day and age, many traditional translations and theologies are slowly being corrected. The line should read, "Only some people in Judea wanted Jesus Killed."

Comments

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    In that, he's not criticizing our book per se; but only Luke 24:19. Keep in mind that Luke was a Gentile, and thus tended to generalize "The Jews." Our book is clear that the party of the Pharisees demanded the crucifixion of Christ, and that many rank-and-file Jews (Cousin Sarah, for example) were at least nominally followers of Jesus, and were quite upset at his death.

    Nothing in our book, so far as I can see, would so much as imply that Christians should persecute Jews. We did not even cite the passage that is being rebutted.

    One must also keep in mind that Jesus Christ was a Jewish man of a Jewish City in a Jewish Country, and that He was raised as an observant Jew, keeping all the festivals; and that He continued as an observant Jew for His entire earthly life. There is no justification whatsoever for Christians to target Jews for any kind of retribution, and even if there were, Christ expressly forgave those who killed Him, saying, "Father, forgive them: They know not what they do."

    So I think that the reviewer missed the point.
  • I agree Skoob. The person said that they were taking a course on mis - translations of the Gospels. I have my own opinions on those too. For instance who is teaching these courses? Are they Christian or non believer. This in itself would affect the outcome of the course. Also where do they get their information? Were these people Christian or non believers? I'm very careful about such things when it comes to the Bible. But Skoob I agree with you, nowhere in the book did it say anything the reviewer was saying. I don't see where they got that the book had any hate toward Jews whatsoever. They could have just read the book and enjoyed the story. But at least we got one review now. It's a start :sweat_smile:
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited July 12
    Hello, I bought the book and reviewed it. Here is the full review I made in Lulu.
    • By Elizabeth Keimach
    • I enjoyed reading this novel for children. It's the story of Jesus leading up to his death on the cross,as seen through the eyes of a young Jewish boy. I think that most young Christian readers will love this book. The language is right at their level and the research for the Jewish Pesach is spot on for that period. The characters too are well defined and youngsters will get an idea of what life was like during the time of Jesus. A well written book for Christian children. There is one criticism I would make. I am taking a course on mis-translations in the gospels. According to the Gospels, most Jews – and most Judeans – strongly supported Jesus/Yeshua of Nazareth, while a tiny minority wanted him killed. Losing sight of this fact, later editors and translators often produced texts that made readers think instead that the entire Jewish people had murdered this “powerful prophet” (Luke 24:19). The claim that “the Jews killed Christ” then fed into anti Jewish hatred and violence across the globe for many centuries. In this day and age, many traditional translations and theologies are slowly being corrected. The line should read, "Only some people in Judea wanted Jesus Killed." Perhaps a slight editing in your book might be helpful.
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    I was brought up a Christian but my recent visit to Auschwitz brought back the horrors of Christian anti-semitism.  I think anyone who writes of this period must make it abundantly clear that according to most historians the Romans were to blame for Jesus’ death. Crucifixion was the usual punishment among Romans, not Jews. At the time of Jesus’ death, the Romans were imposing a harsh and brutal occupation of Israel, and some Jews, including Jesus, were rebellious. (He hated the fact that the Jews had to use Roman money, so were using the temple to exchange the coins.)The Romans would have had reason to want to silence Jesus.

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    Jews lacked a motive for killing Jesus. The different factions of the Jewish community at the time, the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the Essenes and others had disagreements with one another, but that did not lead any of them to arrange the execution of the other allegedly heretical groups’ leaders. It is therefore unlikely they would have targeted Jesus.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    Larika said:
    I was brought up a Christian but my recent visit to Auschwitz brought back the horrors of Christian anti-semitism.  I think anyone who writes of this period must make it abundantly clear that according to most historians the Romans were to blame for Jesus’ death. Crucifixion was the usual punishment among Romans, not Jews. At the time of Jesus’ death, the Romans were imposing a harsh and brutal occupation of Israel, and some Jews, including Jesus, were rebellious. (He hated the fact that the Jews had to use Roman money, so were using the temple to exchange the coins.)The Romans would have had reason to want to silence Jesus.


    While I agree that writers need to be careful not to inflame an anti-semetic passion, and to recognize that there is no excuse for one ethnicity to persecute another, I think that it puts a rather large burden onto a children's book to require it to express that concept explicitly. I don't believe that anyone will come away from our book thinking, "Well, I need to go and persecute some Jews after reading that." Of course, I can't account for the perceptions of others.

    I think that Luke, being a Gentile and less sensitive to the distinctions between the Pharisees (religious leaders) and the Saduccees (political leaders) and the Essenes (monks in the desert) and the common people, may have tended to say "The Jews" when he meant "A faction of the Pharisees within the Sanhedrin." But one must note that Luke was writing primarily to other Gentiles, who also would not have understood the distinctions.

    It is certainly a sensitive topic, and some writers in the past have used the lack of a distinction in Luke to inflame public opinion (Would God that clearer and cooler heads might always prevail). I think we can agree that such writers did not capture Luke's intent, nor ours.

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    Larika said:
    Jews lacked a motive for killing Jesus. The different factions of the Jewish community at the time, the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the Essenes and others had disagreements with one another, but that did not lead any of them to arrange the execution of the other allegedly heretical groups’ leaders. It is therefore unlikely they would have targeted Jesus.

    In general, as a whole, no, they might not. But Jesus did create some religious conflict by seeming to blaspheme (He claimed to be God, for example: Any rabbi hearing such a thing was honor bound to tear his clothes and throw dirt into the air). He also created some political turmoil not taking sides in the Roman question. One of his followers (Levi) was a tax collector -- a traitor to Israel -- and another was a Zelote (Zealot) sworn to kill those who sided with Rome. I think there might have been some sleepless nights in the camp...

    A faction within the Sanhedrin did wish to kill Jesus, but others within the Sanhedrin did not, such as Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea. So we must be careful not to paint with a broad brush, imho.

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited July 13

    I have added the extra beginning to my review in Amazon. I did find the book interesting, but made the comment about mistranslations because I am so conscious that one has to be very careful when writing about this period in history. I feel, even in books for children, certain things have to be made explicit. The Romans killed Jesus not the Jews and as Skoob said, yes a small group were angry at Him but they did not kill Him. 

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile

    The person said that they were taking a course on mis - translations of the Gospels. I have my own opinions on those too. For instance who is teaching these courses? Are they Christian or non believer. This in itself would affect the outcome of the course. Also where do they get their information? Were these people Christian or non believers? I'm very careful about such things when it comes to the Bible.

    The Israel Bible Centre offers these courses online. When I was in Israel I met many Jewish Christians. These courses are there to foster good relationships between Jews and Christians and meant to create understanding so that events like the Holocaust will never happen again and anti-semitism will be a thing of the past. https://israelbiblecenter.com/courses/judaism-days-of-jesus-i-understanding-landscape/?via=564ce69">https://israelbiblecenter.com/courses/judaism-days-of-jesus-i-understanding-landscape/?via=564ce69
  • MaggieMaggie Creator
    This excellent discourse has, I'm sure, made everyone curious about the book. What is its title again? "An Easter Story"?

  • MaggieMaggie Creator
    I found it.



  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    Maggie, the cover is by the brilliant artist Ron Miller
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    Yes, and we are very grateful to him for his help, and for everyone who advised us during that project. My church gave these away to children last Easter.
  • MaggieMaggie Creator
    It's a lovely cover.

  • The cover portrayed exactly what I had in mind when I came up with the idea. The boy seeing the events of Jesus life and wondering just who is this man? And of course the conversation he has with his father. I thought the cover was perfect.
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