Just clarifying my understanding of who's the publisher (With Lulu's free ISBN):

CapriUniCapriUni Reader Reader

Okay, I copied the following from Lulu's ISBN Agreement (with my own emphasis added):

 

 

  • You are granting publishing rights to Lulu to act as a publisher on your behalf to retailers and wholesalers globally.
  • Purchasing an ISBN through Lulu is non-refundable.
  • Lulu will assign an ISBN to the title and Lulu.com will be listed as the publisher in all bibliographic feeds.
  • Lulu will be the sole source of bibliographic data on your book. Lulu will feed data to the U.S. ISBN Agency as well as to Bowker's Books In Print ® and other industry databases. The data will identify Lulu.com as the publisher

But I should still come up with my own "Publisher name" for my book... Is this correct?

 

So -- is this somewhat like "Yearling" and "Penguin" books both actually belonging to Dell Publishing?

 

I could live with that.  For one thing, if I bought my own ISBN, I'd have to register for a business license in my city, but I don't have to if my payments are classified as royalties (I checked with city hall).

 

Comments

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor Professor

    Your best chance at succeeding is to come up with your own Imprint name, use your own ISBN, declare your income as Other in your income tax returns. Lulu will only be the printer.

     

    If you use a Lulu ISBN they will be listed as the publisher everywhere, they will keep 30% taxes if you do not fill out the tax forms and are not American.

     

    I truly cannot see any benefits to using a Lulu ISBN. Unless someone is from the US and truly does not have the $125 to spend on their own ISBN.

     A citizen of the world.

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor Professor

    PS. You do not have to register for a business license anywhere to create your own Imprint name. It's just a name.

     A citizen of the world.

  • CapriUniCapriUni Reader Reader

    I am someone from the U.S. 

     

    I do intend to supply Lulu with a completed U.S. W-9 tax form. 

     

    I have zero expectation of earning more than $125.00 from sales of my book in under five years (not looking for profit anyway), even if Lulu never withholds a single penny..

     

    And you've not actually answered my question:

    Is coming up with my own publishing name akin to a large publishing house having many small imprints?

     

    Or: Since I am using Lulu's ISBN (it's already been assigned to my book), should I mention Lulu.com on my copyright page?

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor Professor

    A large publishing house with many small imprints is not the same as Lulu and the millions of Imprint/publisher names on its site.

     

    A large publishing house has legally registered these Imprints. Lulu does not legally register yours nor is it responsible for it. You can change it from day to day.

     

    That is as far as I can answer your question. Perhaps someone else can chime in who feels qualified to discuss the legal and finacial differences.

     

    You should not mention Lulu on your copyright page. It will not benefit you in any way. Imo.

     A citizen of the world.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor Professor

    CapriUni a écrit :

     

     

    So -- is this somewhat like "Yearling" and "Penguin" books both actually belonging to Dell Publishing?

    __________________________

    It very much looks like it, but it is different. By acting as publisher with distributors, Lulu does us a favour, otherwise we shouldn't be distributed.

     

     

  • steelpillowsteelpillow Writer Writer

    It is important to remember that all this this is only applies to the particular Lulu edition. I can get the same title published elsewhere at the same time  - for example an ebook on Smashwords - with a different ISBN and small print - and Lulu have no say in that. The key thing is to make it clear that the copyright belongs to you: but then, you are already doing that for other reasons.

     

    Lulu are publishing for me what would otherwise never get published, and offering me a free ISBN to boot. Yet if I get a deal with a major print house on the back of Lulu's support I can jump ship and pull the Lulu edition any time I want. Lulu are putting their necks on the line for the likes of you and me, and I have no qualms about doing them whatever favour I can in return. Their logo alongside mine on the back cover and title page of their published editions is the least I can do.

     

    I have also been using phrases like "Published by steelpillow in association with Lulu.com". One might also write, "A steelpillow book, published by Lulu.com", etc.

  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor

    steelpillow wrote:

    It is important to remember that all this this is only applies to the particular Lulu edition. I can get the same title published elsewhere at the same time  - for example an ebook on Smashwords - with a different ISBN and small print - and Lulu have no say in that.

     

    Absolutely. Though you then have the confusion of offering the same book through different outlets with different ISBNs.

     

    The key thing is to make it clear that the copyright belongs to you: but then, you are already doing that for other reasons.

     

    Lulu are publishing for me what would otherwise never get published,

     

    Lulu is not publishing anything for you. The plain fact is that (within certain limitations) Lulu will print and distribute anything anyone sends them.

     

    and offering me a free ISBN to boot. Yet if I get a deal with a major print house on the back of Lulu's support I can jump ship and pull the Lulu edition any time I want.

     

    That is not as likely as you might think. Unless a self-published book is proven best-seller, few if any traditional publishers will consider it. One of the problems is, in fact, the very issue this thread is about: ISBNs. What would make a publisher shy away from taking on a previously published work is in fact that there would be a title with two entirely different ISBNs from two different publishers. That ISBN would remain whether you pulled the book from Lulu or not.

     

    Lulu are putting their necks on the line for the likes of you and me, and I have no qualms about doing them whatever favour I can in return. Their logo alongside mine on the back cover and title page of their published editions is the least I can do.

     

    Lulu is not putting anything on the line.

     

    I have also been using phrases like "Published by steelpillow in association with Lulu.com". One might also write, "A steelpillow book, published by Lulu.com", etc.

     

    You are the publisher, not Lulu. Only the technicality of the ISBN makes them seem so.


     

    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • steelpillowsteelpillow Writer Writer

    Ron Miller wrote:

    Though you then have the confusion of offering the same book through different outlets with different ISBNs.

     

    What would make a publisher shy away from taking on a previously published work is in fact that there would be a title with two entirely different ISBNs from two different publishers. That ISBN would remain whether you pulled the book from Lulu or not.

    Not really. What mostly stops a publisher from republishing is the fact that the previous edition didn't sell. Where it does sell, we soon see endless new editions - hardback, softback, pocketbook, US, UK, illustrated, Large Print, etc. etc. - and all with ther own ISBNs. Unsuccessful editions get pulled and ISBNs retired all the time. This is just a non-issue.


     

  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor

    steelpillow wrote:

    Ron Miller wrote:

    Though you then have the confusion of offering the same book through different outlets with different ISBNs.

     

    What would make a publisher shy away from taking on a previously published work is in fact that there would be a title with two entirely different ISBNs from two different publishers. That ISBN would remain whether you pulled the book from Lulu or not.

    Not really. What mostly stops a publisher from republishing is the fact that the previous edition didn't sell. Where it does sell, we soon see endless new editions - hardback, softback, pocketbook, US, UK, illustrated, Large Print, etc. etc. - and all with ther own ISBNs. Unsuccessful editions get pulled and ISBNs retired all the time. This is just a non-issue.


     


    "Where it does sell, we soon see endless new editions - hardback, softback, pocketbook, US, UK, illustrated, Large Print, etc. etc. - and all with ther own ISBNs." Indeed...but all registered to the same publisher (or its licensees). That's the difference. 

     

    There is also the hard fact that---unless something has been a proven success---most publishers will not consider a book that has been previously published.

    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
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