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Another possible cover for Coding Hour

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Comments

  • Okay, I must concede, first, that I am likely wrong in calling it a Celtic knot; A Celtic knot is what I think of when I see it, but that likely says more about me than about the image. And I further concede that the image as drawn tells nothing about the story.
  • still requires someone already knowing what "sort of story"

    To me such covers normally mean myth and magic sort of stuff.

    I am sure that may be true, but it is also very, very generic. Might as well have the cover be a solid color with "Myth and Magic" below the title. I think the cover of this book could---and should---convey a little more than that.
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • still requires someone already knowing what "sort of story"

    To me such covers normally mean myth and magic sort of stuff.
    It does, but that someone is more likely to be the target audience than someone who doesn't have a clue what the images are or what they mean.

    Using a genre specific trope is a short-cut both for a cover designer and their desired audience. It's an active filter, if you like: "Hey, look over here, fantasy fiction reader!"
  • I am sure that may be true, but it is also very, very generic. Might as well have the cover be a solid color with "Myth and Magic" below the title.

    I agree, but it's a very common type of image used on even some top selling books. Possibly Celtic (and Viking art) is attractive to those who know what they represent? "Oh look, it has a Celtic symbol on the cover, I may like to read that, then."   :) And I have to admit they can be very attractive    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=book+covers+with+a+celtic+theme&FORM=HDRSC2
  • Using a genre specific trope is a short-cut both for a cover designer and their desired audience. It's an active filter, if you like: "Hey, look over here, fantasy fiction reader!

    Indeed, in the same manner some types of covers use scantily clad people on them ...  :) I believe they are called 'Bodice Ripper'  stories, and films.

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=erotic+book+covers&FORM=HDRSC2
  • Indeed, in the same manner some types of covers use scantily clad people on them ...  :) I believe they are called 'Bodice Ripper'  stories, and films.
    Lol. I don't think they've been called bodice rippers for quite some time. It ain't Barbara Cartland, not anymore ;).
  • I am sure that may be true, but it is also very, very generic. Might as well have the cover be a solid color with "Myth and Magic" below the title.

    I agree, but it's a very common type of image used on even some top selling books. Possibly Celtic (and Viking art) is attractive to those who know what they represent? "Oh look, it has a Celtic symbol on the cover, I may like to read that, then."   :) And I have to admit they can be very attractive    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=book+covers+with+a+celtic+theme&FORM=HDRSC2

    An interesting collection. I noticed a couple of things. First, virtually the only covers that consisted solely of a Celtic pattern were embossed leather covers that were meant, clearly, to be decorative. Second, the majority of the books that consisted entirely or mostly of Celtic patterns were not fantasy books (but were instead books of Celtic/Irish art, poetry, history, etc.) and those that were fantasy included a pictorial element in addition to the pattern. So it is pretty clear that a Celtic design all by itself is far from any guarantee that a book is a fantasy novel...or even fiction at all, for that matter. Which is really the point of the discussion: is a Celtic pattern alone enough to convey the idea that a book is a novel of myth and magic? From the examples in the link, I would say "no."
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • A_A_Cain said:
    Indeed, in the same manner some types of covers use scantily clad people on them ...  :) I believe they are called 'Bodice Ripper'  stories, and films.
    Lol. I don't think they've been called bodice rippers for quite some time. It ain't Barbara Cartland, not anymore ;).
    I think that a decreasing number of readers would know what a "Bodice" is. :smiley:
  • An interesting collection. I noticed a couple of things. First, virtually the only covers that consisted solely of a Celtic pattern were embossed leather covers that were meant, clearly, to be decorative.

    They don't put those on the covers if the contents have nothing to do with such a subject they represent, but yes, many are very decorative, just like a great many covers. A shame POD cannot give us the same.

     Second, the majority of the books that consisted entirely or mostly of Celtic patterns were not fantasy books (but were instead books of Celtic/Irish art, poetry, history, etc.)

    Fact or fiction, the same subjects then.

     and those that were fantasy included a pictorial element in addition to the pattern. 


    Not all of them, but some are old books, pre-cover printing sort of stuff.

    So it is pretty clear that a Celtic design all by itself is far from any guarantee that a book is a fantasy novel...or even fiction at all, for that matter.

    Indeed, but subject and fact and fiction matters are rarely mixed in stores, so if one sees such a design in the fiction section, then …

     Which is really the point of the discussion: is a Celtic pattern alone enough to convey the idea that a book is a novel of myth and magic? From the examples in the link, I would say "no." 


    If you noticed the search words I used I did not specify fact or fiction, so, indeed. The fictional ones are there though. There are of course many that do not use a Celtic knot though, but those that do are normally of that subject matter, so I am not sure what you are arguing about :)
  • Skoob_ym said:
    A_A_Cain said:
    Indeed, in the same manner some types of covers use scantily clad people on them ...  :) I believe they are called 'Bodice Ripper'  stories, and films.
    Lol. I don't think they've been called bodice rippers for quite some time. It ain't Barbara Cartland, not anymore ;).
    I think that a decreasing number of readers would know what a "Bodice" is. :smiley: 

    Depends where one shops I suspect.   https://www.harveynichols.com/brand/bodice/

    https://armstreet.com/store/bodice/

  • Kevin wrote: "
    If you noticed the search words I used I did not specify fact or fiction, so, indeed. The fictional ones are there though. There are of course many that do not use a Celtic knot though, but those that do are normally of that subject matter, so I am not sure what you are arguing about "

    Actually, the same thought occurred to me as well. I think you are trying much too hard to justify the use of Celtic patterns all by themselves to convey the idea that a book is a novel dealing with myth and magic. The examples you provided themselves argue against this. Indeed, if I do a search more along the lines of what you suggest---looking specifically for fantasy novels that use Celtic designs---the results are almost nil. The vanishingly scant handful of exceptions are either homemade or premade book covers.

    Although you don't seem to think so, there is a real point to this discussion, and that is that a book cover needs to be direct, specific and explicit in conveying what sort of book is on hand, what its ideas and themes might be. It should not be vague or a kind of visual puzzle for a reader to figure out. As I have said before elsewhere, a cover needs to inform a reader beyond the simple generalization that a book is a romance or a mystery. It needs to say something about the book itself, what sets it apart from all of the other romances and mysteries around it. This is an important lesson.

    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Actually, the same thought occurred to me as well. I think you are trying much too hard to justify the use of Celtic patterns all by themselves to convey the idea that a book is a novel dealing with myth and magic.

    Seems I am not trying hard enough  :)  A lot of Celtic books, fact or fiction, are derived from so far back in time even the 'factual' ones are covering myth, oh, and magic. Celtic 'history' is full of both.
  • Although you don't seem to think so, there is a real point to this discussion, and that is that a book cover needs to be direct, specific and explicit in conveying what sort of book is on hand,

    Er, hang on it was myself who started to say that a cover "needs to be direct, specific and explicit in conveying what sort of book is on hand," not in those exact words though, but it's hard work having a discussion if you cannot recall the entire thread. :*
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