First Timer: CAn I also do epublish of the same title?

I am about to publish my very first work, Seems I am a bit too long for a paperfold, and not enough pages for a paperback (75 sides at A5), That is four pages for each sheet of A4 paper. So I guess my booksize is 75 pages, not 15 sheets A4, So I though to try it as an eBook. Question, can I publish as a paperback and then publish again as an eBook? Is this a separate cost or is it included in the cost of the first paperback print? Yep, I am a tad confused and seek the help of a confident author who has used both methods of printing. I guess I am scared my book will be just a complete loss.

Comments

  • HJ_PetersonHJ_Peterson Reader Reader

    The minimum number of pages for a print book is 32, so if your document is 75 pages, you can publish a paperback. Lulu will add blank pages so the total number of pages in your book is divisible by 4. And. yes, you can also create an e-book of your work, but it must have a different ISBN. It doesn't cost anything to publish an e-book with Lulu. There's a lot of good information in the Knowledge Base if you have other quetions.

  • Thank you for that, I am now knee deep in eBook instructions, whew, there is a lot of formatting information. Good to know we can publish eBook with Lulu for free, but there is a lot more work in the setting up as far as I can see. Sanitizing my work to remove all the stuff that is paper based related.

    I was not sure if by pages, Lulu meant pages as in page numbers, or pages as in peices of paper to create the pages, ie, one piece of paper is two pages of print, or if its A5 printed on A4 stock, then a page of paper is four pages of print. Confusing...,

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher

    You're overthinking it.

     

    Page means page, as in one side of a leaf. If Word tells you that you have 100 pages, then you have 100 pages. Period.

     

    How the paper is folded and cut in the print shop is all Lulu's problem.

     

    Yes, you can make a paperback book using a Lulu ISBN and then turn round and make an identical eBook using a Lulu ISBN. The only cost to you is the price of the copies that you purchase, and you get those at the printing cost (no mark-up).

     

    If you're going to be publishing oodles and gobs of books, I'd suggest buying your own ISBNs; it's cheaper on your per-book retail price, and there are tax benefits, should your book make a profit.

  • Great reply, thank you. What??? I get an ISBN number at no cost from Lulu, so, how would buying an ISBN be better? I am not quite sure I follow you there. Is the ISBN not a stock reference number to identify a book???
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius Lulu Genius

    Thank you for that, I am now knee deep in eBook instructions, whew, there is a lot of formatting information.

     

    But have you finished the printed one yet?   

     

    Good to know we can publish eBook with Lulu for free, but there is a lot more work in the setting up as far as I can see. Sanitizing my work to remove all the stuff that is paper based related.

     

    It is simple really (but perhaps it may have been better if you formatted the file for ePub first). Open the file on your PC for the printed version. Select All. Copy it. Paste to a very basic text editor such as Notepad. Open a new file in Word or whatever you are using. Copy the text from Notepad and paste it to the first page on the new file. You should now have pages of just text without Headers, Footers, Sections and other Page Breaks. All you need to do then is just fiddle with it to get it exactly how you want.

    I was not sure if by pages, Lulu meant pages as in page numbers, or pages as in peices of paper to create the pages, ie, one piece of paper is two pages of print, or if its A5 printed on A4 stock, then a page of paper is four pages of print. Confusing...,

     

    To us it simply means number of pages. The page count it shows in your word processor, as set at the Lulu size of book you are creating, because that also has to be the size of the pages set up in your file. Let the printer's software worry about how it makes the book! If I was you I would make sure the page count is divisible by four before you upload it, and add two extra pages at each end.

     

    BTW: ePubs do not have pages, or page counts or actual page sizes.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius Lulu Genius

    Kizz wrote:
    Great reply, thank you. What??? I get an ISBN number at no cost from Lulu,

    Indeed you do, but only for the books with the tick on them in Create (print books), and only for epubs, not for PDF e-books.

    http://www.lulu.com/create/books

     

    http://www.lulu.com/create/ebooks

    so, how would buying an ISBN be better? I am not quite sure I follow you there.
    Because the ISBNs are registered to Lulu as the publisher and it will say so on other retail sites. Millions see no problem with that, I don't, but some do, so prefer themselves to be noted as the publisher, even though they are using Lulu's system to create the book, and print it. I think it also means that although Lulu will place the book on to other retail sites, the owner of the ISBN has to fulfill the orders. Why they feel the need to go to that bother I have no idea when a Lulu ISBN will do it all for you!
    Is the ISBN not a stock reference number to identify a book???
    Not a stock one, no. Don't mix an ISBN up with the type of barcodes shops often stick on to scan at the checkout. An ISBN is a unique identifier of a publication, just as you say, but it also says who the publisher is for those who wish to order direct, or even just to find it on line if they know the ISBN. Other potential retailers for example.

     

  • Now I did not realise that. Ok, food for thought. A couple sites I looked at charge from £80 to £120 for an ISBN and urge you to buy in blocks of ten, Yes, right, I will buy my ISBN's when the income warrants it and the publisher wont give me a break on my massive volume... Some dream huh!
  • Yes, book 1 done and in print Shameless Plug: 'The Dirty Duck' just so you can see I have actually done it, at long last. I am ok with PHP so will in future parse my wonderful text to ensure it fits first time.
    Thanks for helping me clear up the page number thing.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher

    Kizz wrote:
    Great reply, thank you. What??? I get an ISBN number at no cost from Lulu, so, how would buying an ISBN be better? I am not quite sure I follow you there. Is the ISBN not a stock reference number to identify a book???

    Right, so the benefits of buying ISBNs:

     

    First, although Lulu buys ISBNs in huge bulk, and gets them for an extremely low price, they still pay SOMETHING for them.  One ISBN at Bowkers (the official source of ISBNs in the US) costs $125, 10 cost $295 ($29.50 ea), and 100 cost $575 ($5.75) each. We don't know what Lulu pays per each, but it's something. So that means that they have a cost that figures (ever so slightly) into the retail price of your book. 

     

    I'm drawing figures out of the air here, but let's say that with a Lulu ISBN, the lowest possible retail price of your book is $10.00 (you can set a higher price, of course). Well, with your own ISBN, that floor might be $9.50. So if you were thinking of pricing your book low in hopes of building up a readership base for your future books, you can see where there would be a slight advantage to buying an ISBN.

     

    Also, for US authors writing books using its ISBN, Lulu is required to withhold a certain percentage of your royalty revenue against taxes. For example, if your book sells enough copies to generate $28 in revenue, and you choose to receive royalties by check, that might or might not be above the threshold for payment. But if you were using your own ISBN, then tax and withholding are your problem, and you would receive you royalties with a lower effective threshold.

     

    Lulu ISBN: You will receive payment when you have earned royalties of  Threshold * 1.28 (or whatever the withholding percentage is, I'm guessing at 28%) 

    Your ISBN: You will receive payment when you have earned royalties of Threshold.

     

    So there are two possible advantages to using your own ISBNs.

     

    Now, if this is a One and Done, no more, all through, finito -- well, then Lulu ISBNs are absolutely the way to go. But if this is the first of many, and there are dozens more book ideas bubbling up in your mind... Then I'd suggest buying a block of ten, or even 100 (depending on your estimate of your future imagination).

     

    That's how I see it, and actual reality may or may not match what I happen to think.

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher

    Kevin, PHP is a mark-up / scripting language used on a website to make dynamic content.

     

    For example, many forums and chat utilities are based on PHP. It helps a stateless webpage to use state-conscious dynamic content.

  • PHP affords me a very simple text parsing ability.  I write text into an input box, or copy paste, storing it in a MySql table. I can then read it back in almost any format I decide. Now I know the formatting needed for an ebook I just parse out the non needed characters, header info and other non required entries. As a spin off, I get readability statistics and a quick comparison to detect inadvertent plagiarism. Its nothing clever and no doubt other authors will have access to similar tools. I just got annoyed at the error reporting mechanism Lulu uses, simply telling you that an error exists without actually alluding to what is in error, how to detect it, or where to locate it. No big deal.  

    From the wiki: PHP is a server-side scripting language designed primarily for web development but also used as a general-purpose programming language. Originally created by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1994,[4] the PHP reference implementation is now produced by The PHP Development Team.[5] PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page,[4] but it now stands for the recursive acronym PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor.[6]

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius Lulu Genius

    Skoob_Ym wrote:

    Kevin, PHP is a mark-up / scripting language used on a website to make dynamic content.

     

    For example, many forums and chat utilities are based on PHP. It helps a stateless webpage to use state-conscious dynamic content.


    Thanks. I see. What has that got to do with formatting a book?

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius Lulu Genius

    Kizz wrote:

    PHP affords me a very simple text parsing ability.  I write text into an input box, or copy paste, storing it in a MySql table. I can then read it back in almost any format I decide. Now I know the formatting needed for an ebook I just parse out the non needed characters, header info and other non required entries. As a spin off, I get readability statistics and a quick comparison to detect inadvertent plagiarism. Its nothing clever and no doubt other authors will have access to similar tools. I just got annoyed at the error reporting mechanism Lulu uses, simply telling you that an error exists without actually alluding to what is in error, how to detect it, or where to locate it. No big deal.  

    From the wiki: PHP is a server-side scripting language designed primarily for web development but also used as a general-purpose programming language. Originally created by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1994,[4] the PHP reference implementation is now produced by The PHP Development Team.[5] PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page,[4] but it now stands for the recursive acronym PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor.[6]


    Gosh, that sounds remarkably complex. Silly me just uses Word  Smiley Tongue

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