Reviews

Looking for someone to leave a review for an e-book. Thanks.

Comments

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Leave it where? and where is your e-book?

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    I don't see the point of soliciting reviews - especially if no link or book title is provided - as they are meant to be organic. It is true that traditional publishers send out books to be reviewed but you have to remember where those reviews appear. The platforms on which those reviews are published have gravitas.Online reviews, by Joe Soap, do not carry the same level of gravitas and, if posted on a webpage that no one looks at, don't have much impact.

     

    Even if you get the best reviews in the world they have to be displayed somewhere that they will be seen. It is not the reviews alone that generate sales; you need traffic to be driven to the books' page on the internet. Once there, potential buyers might read the reviews and use them to help make decisions about buying the book, or not, as the case may be.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    All very true, and often such postings just mean 'Buy my book.'

  • Getting people to buy your book is a two step process.

     

    Step 1: get them to the landing page.

    Step 2: once at the landing page, persuade them to click the 'Buy' button.

     

    Step 2 is where reviews come in. Yes, of course they're useless if nobody goes to the landing page in the first place, but a load of good reviews makes it more likely that people will buy the book once they're there.


  • danielblue wrote:

    I don't see the point of soliciting reviews - especially if no link or book title is provided - as they are meant to be organic. It is true that traditional publishers send out books to be reviewed but you have to remember where those reviews appear. The platforms on which those reviews are published have gravitas.Online reviews, by Joe Soap, do not carry the same level of gravitas and, if posted on a webpage that no one looks at, don't have much impact.

     

    Even if you get the best reviews in the world they have to be displayed somewhere that they will be seen. It is not the reviews alone that generate sales; you need traffic to be driven to the books' page on the internet. Once there, potential buyers might read the reviews and use them to help make decisions about buying the book, or not, as the case may be.


    True indeed.

     

    Also, when a major publisher sends a copy to a large metropolitan newspaper or a national magazine, the reviewer is under no obligation to give a good review; in fact, if the book is horrible, the newspaper or magazine's reputation stands upon the reviewer saying so.

     

    Be careful what you wish for...


  • Richard_Coady wrote:

    Getting people to buy your book is a two step process.

     

    Step 1: get them to the landing page.

    Step 2: once at the landing page, persuade them to click the 'Buy' button.

     

    Step 2 is where reviews come in. Yes, of course they're useless if nobody goes to the landing page in the first place, but a load of good reviews makes it more likely that people will buy the book once they're there.


    In a previous stage of life, I sometimes had to promote events. I found that this was a three-step process:

     

    1. Getting people to be aware of the event,

    2. Getting people to imagine themselves going, (or to accept that going was something they might do), and

    3. Getting an actual commitment to be there.

     

    Book sales, similarly, would be:

     

    1. Making them aware of the book,

    2. Making them want to read it,

    3. Making them willing to buy it.

     

    In addition to reviews, which may help with step 2., there is having a good product -- the best you can make -- to help with steps two and three.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Also, when a major publisher sends a copy to a large metropolitan newspaper or a national magazine, the reviewer is under no obligation to give a good review; in fact, if the book is horrible, the newspaper or magazine's reputation stands upon the reviewer saying so.

     

    Unfortunately that's not always true because many major publications also have on line book shops stocking the book. It's not in its best interest to give a bad review to books its trying to sell.

     

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=sunday+times+books&tag=mh0a9-21&index=stripbooks&hvadid=3171050295&hvqmt=b&hvbmt=bb&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_l5z85z9zg_b

     

    A few years ago Amazon booted many reviewers when it became obvious they were offering good reviews for cash.

     

    One can often also gain good reviews by paying substantial money for an advert to run at the same time as the review. One can also get bad ones for not doing so when offered.

     

    I once used to make products and it was remarkable the bad reviews it was possible to get if you refused to lend an £80,000 item to a reviewer for a week. Or at least take them out for lunch.

     

    Business can be quite nasty.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    In addition to reviews, which may help with step 2., there is having a good product -- the best you can make -- to help with steps two and three.

     

    Not always true. Media attention can sell even books that are then found out to be rubbish. People buying them to see what all the fuss is about, at times even negative fuss with people wishing to see for themselves.  50 Shades is one example, and most books by Dan Brown another.

     

    Your event example was achieved a couple of times in the UK at Xmas. Remarkable Santa's Grottos/fairs publicised, pay £30 in advance. People arrived to find very little to 'experience'.

  • Which means that next year, they'll skip that affair entirely.

     

    In the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there are a couple of fellows who put on a show called the Royal Nonesuch. It's essentially a scam, and on the third night, the "Performers" make a point of not showing up for the performance. Similar concept.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    People have short memories and the vendors change names and locations.

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