Amazon quality control

So it seems there's been a change at Amazon. As of a couple of days ago if readers complain about poor quality e-books, a notice will go on the book's landing page to warn people about it.

 

When I say 'poor quality' I mean poor formatting, typos etc.

 

Here's a slightly alarmist view of the change, here's a more balanced one, and here's the Amazon page itself.

 

tldr;

"The combined impact on the reading experience of a book with excessive Distracting or Destructive Issues can lead to the book being removed from sale until the corrections are made. A moderate amount of Distracting or Destructive Issues can result in the book remaining available for sale, but with a temporary quality warning displayed on the detail page of the book on Amazon.com until corrections are made."

 

Some of the issues Amazon gives as examples of things that will cause a quality control sticker to appear on your landing page are numbers in place of letters (and vice versa), incorrect punctuation or 'cover issues' (blurred images etc).

 

Personally, I think this is good news.

 

Thoughts?

Comments

  • That is interesting and I also think it's good news. Does it only apply to Kindle Direct e-books though? And what about self-published printed books also?

  • It is good new for readers. However, I sometimes wonder just how much attention readers will pay to something like that.

     

    I have a book which has just one review. It is a very poor review, mostly based on the fact that the book was much shorter than the reader expected. In the blurb I mentioned that it was a very short book and I gave the word count. Despite these two pieces of evidence that this was a very short book the person still bought it and then complained about it being too short. Despite this poor review the book continues to sell. Someone, somewhere, is overlooking something.

     

    I have a feeling that people will continue to buy poorly formatted books, no matter what warnings they are given, and then send them back for a refund.

     

    As for authors...actually having a book removed might be a good incentive to trying to figure out all the things that are wrong with it. On the other hand, when you see people defending their poor written-language skills as being their particular style, some might decide that discretion is the better part of valour and just walk away.

     

    Methinks there is a business opportunity in this as in HasYourBookBeenRejectedByKindle?LetMeFixIt dot com!

  • I think that`s great news and about time. It will force all authors to produce professioanl quality books. And it will increase sales for those who have.

     

    I purchased one book from Amazon that was a complete formatting mess, and it was frsutrating, making me hesitate now each time I buy from an unknown publisher.

     A citizen of the world.

  • It is good new for readers. However, I sometimes wonder just how much attention readers will pay to something like that.

     

    The self-publishers who read that page of rules? Judging by some of the replies we get to suggestions made here, not many. Book buyers who spot such errors? I hope they all do!

     

    I have a book which has just one review. It is a very poor review, mostly based on the fact that the book was much shorter than the reader expected. In the blurb I mentioned that it was a very short book and I gave the word count. Despite these two pieces of evidence that this was a very short book the person still bought it and then complained about it being too short. Despite this poor review the book continues to sell. Someone, somewhere, is overlooking something.

     

    Almost all, if not all, the sites our books are listed on display a page count, even for e-books. If buyers do not notice it then it's their own fault.

     

    I have a feeling that people will continue to buy poorly formatted books, no matter what warnings they are given, and then send them back for a refund.

     

    Perhaps some are very forgiving after reading a Preview? But one has to wonder if people are buying books without bothering to read a Preview, and then moaning about it. But I doubt a return policy includes returns because a book breaks rules such as Amazon's new ones. Which puzzles me any way, because at least at Kindle Direct it takes a while for a book to be OKed for publication. Long enough for a human or even software to scan the text.

     

    As for authors...actually having a book removed might be a good incentive to trying to figure out all the things that are wrong with it.

     

    Indeed. But commissioning editors, as an example, often have their own idea to what is 'perfect' English. How stiff are they going to be? "You dropped a fullstop ... "

     

    On the other hand, when you see people defending their poor written-language skills as being their particular style, some might decide that discretion is the better part of valour and just walk away.

     

    Yup. How rigid are the rules? What I think they are are guidelines now high-lighted by whoever checks the input at Kindle because they are sick of how much they have to reject.

     

    Methinks there is a business opportunity in this as in HasYourBookBeenRejectedByKindle?LetMeFixIt dot com!

     

    Not beforeyourbookisrejectedbykindlehaveitlookedat.com? Such services already exist, but they charge money.

  • Buyers are invited by Amazon to give their opinions on the products they have bought.  I have often assessed books and seen I was not the only one to do this.

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