Harder than some think

I am sure not many people realise how hard it is to self-publish a book. Well, no, that’s the easy part. What I mean is to create a document that can be used to create a book that looks like one from professional publishing companies. We witness so many not very-well created self-published books. (And I do not only mean how it looks.)

If a manuscript is taken up by a respected publishing company, a team of people set to work on it.

An Editor is one, who will suggest changes. That process may go back and forward a lot, but not forever because there will be a deadline. He/she will not expect spelling and grammar mistakes because even if your letter of approach contained any it would have been binned.

Eventually a Proofreader will look over the finished MS. It’s their job to only look for typos and other mistakes. They do not edit the work.

Typesetters are not used nowadays, although they may be credited still because someone still has to lay out the MS on a PC to look like the pages of a book..

There will also be artistic directors involved. Marketing managers, accountants, agents, and their bosses.

The above is actually simplified.

A self-publisher has to do all the above themselves, unless they can afford to pay people to do it, who will not usually tell them that the MS is not even worth publishing. They will still take the money.

Comments

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    Tres amusant. Usually it would be one very sarky Kevin Lomas saying 'So what?'

    but now the tables seem to have turned.

     

    It would be lovely if there was a clear division between those who were deadly earnest

    about self publishing - i.e. those who genuinely think they could sell a million books -

    and everyone else.

     

    The latter would know to ignore all the earnest advise. Anyone serious about writing

    would find an agent and publisher. The rest of us are just dipping our toes in the water.

     

    Viva L'amateur!

     

  • I'm sure that every endeavor has its craftsmen and its pretenders.

     

    Artists who can paint exact copies of "Girl with a Pearl Earring" probably grouse about the goofs who slop some paint on a canvas and call it art.

     

    If we had a peek into the afterlife reserved for artists, I'm sure that we'd see Pollock and Modrian being chased around by Rembrandt and El Greco, the latter pair armed with either harps or pitchforks, as appropriate.

     

    Most of us are "serious enough."

     

    We don't want to discuss whether our work is postmodern subatomic transexistential metafiction with a deconstruction of the quasiluminal clarity of beingness. We just want to write a good story, frame it is a good layout and cover, and offer it to the world.

     

    But on the ends of the scale there are those who count their letters and make them adhere to the ETOIAN SHRDLU pattern, or there are those who can't be bothered to distinguish there, their and they're.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Tres amusant. Usually it would be one very sarky Kevin Lomas saying 'So what?'

     

    Huh? I have never said anything remotely like that. Some posters have a habit of putting words in to people's mouths.

     

    but now the tables seem to have turned.

     

    Huh? Part two. Which forum have you been reading?

     

    Anyway ...

     

    It would be lovely if there was a clear division between those who were deadly earnest about self publishing - i.e. those who genuinely think they could sell a million books - and everyone else.

     

    That makes no sense because the delusional who pay little attention to the product they are creating also think they can sell a million books, and also get instant film contracts. You should read the postings more often. But on the other hand there's some decent books published by major publishing houses that sell nowhere near a million.

     

    The latter would know to ignore all the earnest advise.

     

    Really? such as the advice of an editor? Did you actually read what I posted? And what Ron also often says? And it's advice in the context you just used. Something an editor would spot.

     

    Anyone serious about writing would find an agent and publisher. The rest of us are just dipping our toes in the water.

     

    Not at all true. Many who have sold 1000s of books via agents and publishers now use POD self-publishing because they can make more money that way.

     

    BTW: A self-publisher is a publisher ...

     

    PS: so you disagree with what I posted?

     

    PPS: Surely only the OP should click Problem Solved. But I did not even post a Problem. This forum gets a bit random at times.

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    Kevin

     

    One thing we agree on is that nasty green check / tick. I don't know why people do it. The only person who should be able to decide if a 'problem' is solved is the person who made the original post.

     

    I was going to try to find the post where you suggested someone stop posting advice about correct grammar usage as it was only falling on deaf ears and could be seen as self aggrandizement on the part of the person who made the posts. However, the forum only shows 100 pages of posts and your earliest post currently accessible is 03-09-2015 so this post is now lost in the mists of time.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    I was going to try to find the post where you suggested someone stop posting advice about correct grammar usage as it was only falling on deaf ears

     

    Just one post? Is that it? But yes, it often does, and I am not the only one who says sensible advice is ignored. Have a go at them also.

     

    and could be seen as self aggrandizement on the part of the person who made the posts.

     

    And perhaps it was, but I don't recall saying that. But if I did it was possibly true, and you are missing the fact that I am often agreed with, but you appear to have some grudge against me. The forum is not a self-help group for people of a nervous disposition who think even constructive criticism is 'rude'. People are allowed to have an opinion even if some do not like opinions.

     

    However, the forum only shows 100 pages of posts and your earliest post currently accessible is 03-09-2015 so this post is now lost in the mists of time.

     

    Really? How come I reply to new posts in threads that are many years old then? But why are you having so much bother trying to find a thread that proves your point?

     

    You do know you are turning in to a troll? There's times I think you are not playing with a full deck. No offence. It's an opinion...

     

    But what on Earth has this got to do with what I posted here? That is the total truth? What fault to you see in it?

  • Good advice does fall on deaf ears. I've often endeavored to teach others what I know, in many fields. I've found that the more cheat-sheets and user guides and helpful tips I write, the more people learn only that when they encounter X, they should call me. Learning to deal with X is more than they care to learn.

     

    So I do sympathize with Kevin's position (Did I say that?) and yet, imho, there are third parties out there, reading along, who do learn and who do apply what we say. I once wrote out a step-by-step guide for tracing ground faults in outdoor lighting, a common problem where I worked. For the most part, the effort was wasted.

     

    But one individual took that guide and actually followed it, and was able to work a minor miracle that no one else could resolve. Instead of merely being the wizard, I helped make a new wizard.

     

    That, I think, is where our helpful advice plays in: The gate is narrow, and few there be that find it. But those who hear our advice and do it will be improved by it.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Good advice does fall on deaf ears.

     

    Indeed it does, but my OP in this thread was not actual advice, just about how major publishing houses compare with one man band self-publishers. I have no idea how Dan's ranted fitted in.

     

    I've often endeavored to teach others what I know, in many fields. I've found that the more cheat-sheets and user guides and helpful tips I write, the more people learn only that when they encounter X, they should call me. Learning to deal with X is more than they care to learn.

     

    I have been an instructor for all sorts of things and people learn slowly, but it also depends on how easy it is to take in what they are being told, and if they really need to know. Simple things are easy to remember. Or if they think they need to know.

     

    So I do sympathize with Kevin's position (Did I say that?) and yet, imho, there are third parties out there, reading along, who do learn and who do apply what we say.

     

    Well some one must be clicking the Solved buttons on old posts, which is good. One thing I have learned is people will often pick up advice but not thank who gave it them, In fact they often forget where they heard it from.

     

    I once wrote out a step-by-step guide for tracing ground faults in outdoor lighting, a common problem where I worked. For the most part, the effort was wasted.

     

    But one individual took that guide and actually followed it, and was able to work a minor miracle that no one else could resolve. Instead of merely being the wizard, I helped make a new wizard.

     

    Yes there are those who sort of absorb what they see, read and hear, but who can also put it to practical use. Rare people unfortunately. I used to write and sell guides and the only important thing in that instance is if people bought them. It was up to them if they followed them. I had my money.

     

    That, I think, is where our helpful advice plays in: The gate is narrow, and few there be that find it. But those who hear our advice and do it will be improved by it.

     

    Well said. but even so, my OP was not actually advice  Smiley Happy

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    Smiley SurprisedSmiley SurprisedSmiley Surprised

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