ISBN copyright page

I am new to this.

I produced my book in Adobe Indesign and can PDF it. Do I account for bleed all the way around? Also, what is the best way for me to produce a Copyright page. Pick it up from another book, then alter for my purpose. I would then need an ISBN and a bar code for the back cover. Thank you. Steve

Comments

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    stevenck wrote:

    I am new to this.

    I produced my book in Adobe Indesign and can PDF it. Do I account for bleed all the way around?

     

    Bleed only applies to where the pages meet at the spine.

     

    Also, what is the best way for me to produce a Copyright page. Pick it up from another book, then alter for my purpose.

     

    That can work yes, but some are very word heavy. Some samples are here >>  http://thebookshepherd.com/sample-copyright-pages.html

     

    I would then need an ISBN and a bar code for the back cover. Thank you. Steve

     

    Project Wizards provide the ISBNs. You add only the code to your copyright page. ISBN xxxxxxxxxx. The inbuilt Cover Wizard add the barcode to the back cover.


     

  • Thank you for the answers.

    What if I am doing my production entirely offline, in InDesign? Thank you again.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    Hello Steve,

    At the beginning of the creation process, Lulu asks you if you want your book to be distributed worldwide.  If you do, you are then offered a free ISBN.

    1) Accept it and take it down.

    2) Return to your book file on your computer.

    2) Type this number in the copyright page.

    3) Convert your wordprocessor file into PDF.  

    4) Return to your Lulu project.

    5) Pass to the following step.

    6) Upload your PDF file.

    The rest is plain sailing.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    stevenck wrote:

    Thank you for the answers.

    What if I am doing my production entirely offline, in InDesign? Thank you again.


    I get the idea you have not yet learned how Lulu works so I suggest you start with this >>  

     

    http://www.lulu.com/learn

  • DysonLogosDysonLogos Bibliophile

    kevinlomas wrote:

    stevenck wrote:

    I am new to this.

    I produced my book in Adobe Indesign and can PDF it. Do I account for bleed all the way around?

     

    Bleed only applies to where the pages meet at the spine.

     


    This is 100% untrue, as we've discussed in the past. The fact that you continue to tell people that bleed is only to the spine is propagating misinformation that you KNOW is wrong.

     

    Bleed applies to the very edges of the page also if you want a full bleed image that goes to the outer edge of the page - whether to the spine, the top or the bottom of the page (or all of the above). (For example, I run bleed to the outer edge of the page often without also running to the spine.)

     

    Here's the help on working with full bleed images: http://connect.lulu.com/t5/Interior-Formatting/How-do-I-make-my-content-stretch-all-the-way-to-the-edge-of-the/ta-p/33675

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    It's not at all untrue so why you keep arguing I have no idea. When people are asking about it it's obvious that is what they mean because anything that runs out of the other three margins is not called bleed and does not have to line up with anything.

     

    But it also means a colour accidentally running in to another.

  • DysonLogosDysonLogos Bibliophile

    kevinlomas wrote:

    It's not at all untrue so why you keep arguing I have no idea. When people are asking about it it's obvious that is what they mean because anything that runs out of the other three margins is not called bleed and does not have to line up with anything.

     


    Garbage and misinformation - as we discussed the last time that you insisted that bleed only applies to the inner margin of the page. I keep arguing it because what YOU are describing as bleed is only part of what bleed is in printing.

     

    If you are so sure that the material going to / beyond the edge of the page on the other three margins is NOT called bleed, please educate us and explain what it is called because no print shop, publisher, or layout software or hardware I've worked with has used any other term

     

    From Wikipedia:

     

    Bleed is a printing term that refers to printing that goes beyond the edge of the sheet before trimming. In other words, the bleed is the area to be trimmed off. The bleed is the part on the side of a document that gives the printer a small amount of space to account for movement of the paper, and design inconsistencies. Artwork and background colors can extend into the bleed area. After trimming, the bleed ensures that no unprinted edges occur in the final trimmed document.

     

    It is very difficult to print exactly to the edge of a sheet of paper/card so, to achieve this, it is necessary to print a slightly larger area than is needed and then trim the paper/card down to the required finished size. Images, background images and fills which are intended to extend to the edge of the page must be extended beyond the trim line to give a bleed.

     

    Full bleed is printing from one edge of the paper to the other without the standard borders by which most personal printers are limited. This is useful for printing brochures, posters, and other marketing materials. Often the paper is trimmed after printing to ensure the ink runs fully to the edge and does not stop short of it.

  • DysonLogosDysonLogos Bibliophile
    I know I've said this before, but I'm obviously a sucker for punishment.

    I GIVE UP.

    You go on, keep telling everyone that bleed only applies to the spine and not the other three sides of the page; that JPEG images are not a lossy format and have somehow become "the industry standard" even though the publishing industry prefers lossless formats; that sewn or stitched signatures haven't been used in book binding in decades; that pricing ebooks at $9.99 is a bad idea that won't sell; and whatever other misinformation you insist is reality should be spread to those asking pertinent questions.

    You spread your disinformation and keep telling yourself that I'm wrong and you are right - I'll go back to talking to people who actually make a living writing and publishing books.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    There's Bleed and Full Bleed, but modern printing machines just need the Print To The Edge option selected.

     

    I have been using jpgs for 30 years, and still have some of those images, and they have not lost a thing. It's now standard due to most things that capture images are digital using jpgs.

     

    Stitched signatures? LOL. do you keep a log of postings? That was covered years ago and if you bother to look at a large number of modern books they are not stitched. I am not saying it's not still done, just very rarely, because it's costly. Better glue perhaps? Oh, and did I not say that my father bound books and he did not stitch them and they did not fall apart.

     

    You really should take notice of all I say instead of just taking a few words out of context. Did you not also read me saying that when Amazon started to sell ebooks there was a massive outcry that publishers set the prices the same as their printed books. An outcry because ebooks cost nothing to print and ship, Buyers are not stupid. The publishers dropped their prices greatly. I also mentioned a famous incident where one writer insisted his ebooks were sold for less than $2. From that time to within a month he had sold a million.

     

    You need to click the links I provide because I know you don't, as well as do some research yourself.

     

    Are you going then?

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