Cover - Print Paperback

I am trying to design a simple cover. I do not want/need anything on the back cover and yet every design choice seems to have a text box on the back that I can't delete.  When I review the cover, there is a big, empty text box which I assume would actually be on the cover.  How can I delete it??  Also, on the front cover, the title is inside a colored text box. Is there a way to change the color of that text box without changing the color of the entire cover?

Comments

  • 2 things;

    first of all, to get rid of that little text on the front with the title and your name, there is tab for the cover wizard for text. Select that, then uncheck the 'show author name' and 'show title' boxes.

    But, you may be more interested in using the Advanced One Piece Cover designer. You can design the cover exactly as you want it. Just remember to leave room on the back for the ISBN bar code--if you plan on distributing it.

  • The back cover has a frame for the author's portrait [picture], another one for the author's bio [text], and a third one for a presentation of the book [text].  If you do not fill the frames of the templates, they will be ignored by the wizzard, and the back cover will just be plain. You can check this by the end of the process when the cover is ready, then when it is finished. A PDF file of the final version of the cover is downloadable, so that you can see what your cover will look like.

  • The back will have an ISBN on though, or if not, a printer's barcode.

  • Hi NannyK

    If you are planning to sell the book on Amazon, all fields on the book cover template must be completed (image, book summary, etc.). If these fields are left blank, Amazon will reject the book.

     

  • Thanks but I am not planning on selling my book. It's for my use only. I have figured out a way to get a plain cover
  • If you are planning to sell the book on Amazon, all fields on the book cover template must be completed (image, book summary, etc.). If these fields are left blank, Amazon will reject the book.

    Really? I was not aware of that. Granted, Title and author, but image and blurb?

  • Until recently, this was not an issue. However, Amazon's QA department now rejects print books for distribution if any field on the cover template is left blank.  Perhaps null fields cause issues in their prining process or they are becoming more picky in what they will distribute.

  • Interesting. Amazon know what frames are in Lulu's Cover Wizard? What about covers that do not use them at all?


  • kevinlomas a écrit :

    Interesting. Amazon know what frames are in Lulu's Cover Wizard? What about covers that do not use them at all?


    Kevin, I don't think it works this way. 

    All my paperback books have a blurb printed on the back cover, except one - a printed version of a US university's PDF of Favre's Malay-French dictionary (1875), probably made in Goa, India, obvioulsy without the permission of the university. Even this one has a bar code and a vague design. 

    Therefore a paperback book with a blank backcover is always suspicious that it is something either illegal or faulty. 

  • Kevin asked: "What about covers that do not use them at all?"

    I would like to hear that answer, Glenn. What about those of us who design their own covers? I do know that my latest book published a few months ago had no problems getting through, but it appears that this is a more recent change to Amazon's requirements.

    See if you can get us a more difinitive reading on this requirement.

  • I don't see why a book with no blurb on the back should be suspicious.

    There's always something on the back of my covers, but I was just wondering why Amazon insist that there is blurb on them.

    I own a lot of old hardback books that have nothing on the back (and they were never made with dustjackets) not even barcodes because there was no such thing. I see no harm in there not being anything on the backs if that's what a cover designer wishes.


  • kevinlomas a écrit :

    I own a lot of old hardback books that have nothing on the back (and they were never made with dustjackets) not even barcodes because there was no such thing. I see no harm in there not being anything on the backs if that's what a cover designer wishes.

    Kevin, you've said it; the difference is between paperback and hardback. I had a look at my English and French paperbacks printed before the advent of barcodes. (The oldest dates back to 1933.) They all have something printed at the back ranging from a brief presentation to a list of books in the same collection.

    I think it's a matter of commercial style. Generally hardbacks have a plain cover and no blurb. If such exist, they are printed on the jacket.

    Perhaps a paperback ought to have something printed at the back because paperback used to be a lot more fragile than hardbacks so that customers were / are not encouraged to open them in order to keep them in their mint condition. Instead customers are discreetly invited to read the blurb. In France, if a paperback has next to nothing on its cover, it is not a paperback in the English sense; it's not a glued book, but a sewn book with a soft cover - such books were meant to be bound separately after their purchase, if you could afford it.

    In the case of today's sewn books with a glued cover, like Lulu's, it is obviously the commercial concern that predominates. As often recalled in this forum, the cover is the first thing that catches the customer's attention, hence the fact that Amazon shows them on its sites. So if you want your book to sell well, you'd better design your cover carefully, and put as much information on it as possible.

    Conversely, if your book is not for distribution, then you needn't bother with the blurb. I had some volumes of correspondence printed by Lulu. Only two copies of each were printed, then the projects were withdrawn. They have no blurb. Smiley Happy

  • Well, it takes as long to 'print' a blank back cover as it does one full of stuff, unless it is white of course, but they all have a barcode on. Perhaps Createspace are moaning at the time taken to create a back cover with nothing on it? Smiley Very Happy

  • I think it has more to do with null fields in the file we send them. But, regardless of the reason, if you choose a template with multiple fields for text and image, the fields must be populated or Amazon will reject the book for distribution.

  • Does it matter what the image is?

     

    Because I don't have a good photo of myself to put on the cover, and I don't have access to a photographer.

  • I don't believe the image used is significant, there just needs to be something in the frames provided in the template.

  • Okay, cool  I can repeat a motif from the front cover, then.

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