Author
PASTFoundation
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Saddle-Stitch Bleed

[Ken – I know that you don't use bleed settings on InDesign. I've read your perspective on that a hundred times in other forums. Please don't tell me not to use InDesign's bleed feature.]

..

Hello, everyone.

I am publishing a 20-page book, saddle-stitched. I want to print it full-bleed. I am using InDesign.

Given the dynamics of saddle-stitching, this book will essentially be 10 long pages, printed front and back, and folded. Therefore, there should be no "bleed" on the inside side of the printed pages.

However, Lulu directs me to submit a PDF with 0.125" bleed margin on all four sides. Shouldn't it only be on three sides (top, bottom, outside)? Lulu's way would only work if each page were trimmed on all four sides. Saddle-stitch books are only trimmed on three sides (the fourth side is folded).

How does this work, exactly? Please be as detailed as you know how to be. None of the other forums really address this issue.

Thank you for your help.

 

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Professor
Maggie
Posts: 2,856
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

You will submit a PDF to Lulu, so regardless of where you made it (Lulu does not care), it must have bleed on all sides.

 

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Author
PASTFoundation
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

Thank you for your help, Maggie. I appreciate your comment.

However, I feel as though my primary question remains unanswered. A saddle-stitched book is composed of long sheets of paper (spreads) folded in half. Therefore, the crease of this fold is not trimmed. When I compose my PDF as Maggie suggested, with 0.125" bleed on all four sides, then facing pages overlap with their bleed.

Perhaps I am not explaining myself very well. Here's an example: The left page of a particular spread is green. The right page of that same spread is blue.

When I create a PDF with 0.125" margins on all sides, the following happens: the green page has 0.125" of blue on its "inside-side," and the blue page has 0.125" of green on its "inside-side."

Saddle-stitch books are folded, not trimmed (on the inside-side). So how does Lulu accommodate this?

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Professor
Ken Anderson
Posts: 11,719
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

[ Edited ]
 
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Author
PASTFoundation
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

Thank you for your comment, Ken – 150 is an impressive number, especially since you exceeded it. There is a strong possibility that I will use your method in the end. However, I am simply trying to understand all of my options before making a decision.

I still do not understand the option Lulu suggests (as posted by David Woodward here).

Can someone please explain how saddle-stitch full-bleed printing works? Saddle-stitch spreads are folded, not cut. Therefore, it seems to me that there should be no bleed allowance on the binding side of each page.

What are the logistics of this process? Am I misunderstanding something?

Thank you for your help.

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Professor
Ken Anderson
Posts: 11,719
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

[ Edited ]
 
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Author
PASTFoundation
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

Thank you, Ken, your comments are helpful. I fully understand your method. I am not confused. It is very clear.

Thank you.

However, I am also asking a different question, about a different process. Lulu posted guidelines on full-bleed printing here (posted by David Woodward). I would like to know how four-sided bleed allowances work with saddle-stitch binding.

Because saddle-stitched books are folded, not trimmed, it seems to me that the binding-edge of each page should not have a bleed.

Could somebody please explain why my understanding is wrong? Or how this works?

Thank you so much!

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Professor
Ken Anderson
Posts: 11,719
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

[ Edited ]

I don't know why I bother :smileymad:

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Professor
Maggie
Posts: 2,856
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

[ Edited ]

PASTFoundation,

Many of my children's books are saddle stitched ( I used Open Office and Photoshop).  I still needed to add bleed. The printer cropped evenly everywhere, even though, because it is stitched, one might think it isn't necessary on the inside.

It is actually much simpler if you do not think too much about it; it can boggle the mind. Just try it and order one copy.

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Author
PASTFoundation
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-11-2010

Re: Saddle-Stitch Bleed

Lulu says, "Use bleed settings."
Ken says, "Don't use bleed settings." 

How is this straightforward?!?

There are obviously two ways of doing the same thing. I understand one of them (Ken's solution). I do not understand the other (Lulu's solution).

Maggie, you have been most helpful. Even though you can't explain how it works, I appreciate you taking the time to understand my question and respond directly to my concerns.

I am glad to finally learn that Lulu's solution does work, in whatever unexplainable way..

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