Idea for a cover... usual disclaimers apply

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Comments

  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor
    edited March 11
    You may want to go back and reread what I wrote.

    I recall what you wrote.

    Apparently not.

     Sketching in traditional media like pen and ink provides practice that sketching in pencil or with a stylus on a graphics tablet cannot, by their nature, provide.

    Why can it not? There's no difference. Just the medium.

    See below:

     For one thing, a pen is unforgiving. There is no turning back, no erasing a misbegotten line.

    Use a pencil then. It's not maths where someone expects to see your 'working out.'

    The point is to use a medium that cannot be corrected as you go. 

     This makes me look more closely at my subject and think harder about every line before I put it down.

    Where's the difference?  Using a graphics prog is not unthinking slapdash.

    Didn't say it was. But, just like working with a pencil, a line drawn by a stylus using a graphics tablet or mouse can be easily corrected on the fly. The point in drawing directly with something like pen and ink (for instance, say with a ballpoint pen) is that you know you are stuck with whatever you do. So it makes you think harder.

     I also like to sketch with a brush and ink and even with the stopper to my ink bottle. These—especially the latter—give me line qualities almost impossible to attain any other way.

    You need to practice more with a graphics prog then.

    I make my living creating artwork digitally. I moved from traditional media to digital in my commercial work nearly twenty years ago. 

    In any case, in addition to the points I made above, I like the immediacy of the effects I can get, which can often be achieved without stopping to push a button. That is, I can sometimes go from one line style and texture to another in a single stroke. I don't have to stop and think about anything but what I am working on at that moment.

    But, if you like, you can post a drawing emulating the line I get from sketching with an ink bottle stopper on watercolor paper. I have to admit I would love to see it!

     
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor
    edited March 11
    There's nothing in your sketches that cannot be achieved on a PC using the 100s of tools provided, even using them freehand.
    You are more than free to do one!  ;)

    Here is a good one to start with. The original required only one drawing tool and a soda straw. It took no more than five minutes to create so set your timer!
    Image may contain 1 person
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor
    edited March 11
    It is exactly that “smoothing out” process that you are glossing over.

    Not in the least. I started off mentioning Stage One, and continued to do so.
    Exactly what I have been saying: you mention "stage one" endlessly...and scarcely a word about anything that should take place after that. Indeed, you dismiss the entire process of finishing the drawing---musculature, shape, expression, gesture, light and shadow, drapery, etc.---as "smoothing out."

    That's "glossing over."
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor
    I do see them and I have never contested their importance—

    Well you have, in this thread, constantly,

    Quote me.

    Scroll up, or remember all you have typed.

    The burden of proof is on you. You claim that I have repeatedly denied the importance of preliminary basic shapes and lines. Show me.

    but that’s never been the point.

    It's been my point, in this thread.

     The point is being able to go from whatever framework you start with to a finished rendering of a realistic—or at least recognizable—human being. That’s what takes practice and training.

    Quite so, but it's a start. It all starts with the shape, as I am sure you must know (we are dealing with someone who said they cannot draw) which is far faster to achieve in a graphics prog than it is sat with pencil in hand staring at some naked persons for a year or two. (Why not just look at photos?)

    Photos are good reference, too, but having someone to guide and critique your work makes the learning process a lot shorter.


    One would hope. But if someone just does not 'have it' there's little point. But the classes will still take your dosh for as long as they can.

    My, my...is there a note of bitterness I detect here?



    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor
    Well, I am done with this discussion, which has become pretty ridiculously off-point. I can only hope that Skoob sees the good sense in my original suggestion and acts on it.

    Over and out.
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher
    Well, I am done with this discussion, which has become pretty ridiculously off-point. I can only hope that Skoob sees the good sense in my original suggestion and acts on it.

    Over and out.
    I do see the sense in it. I'm actually a fair hand at calligraphy and orthography, but my issues lie in proportion. A class would probably do me a lot of good.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher
    It has come to fruition. Thank you one and all for your help and advice on the cover.

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/og-keep/how-to-be-a-christian/paperback/product-24025691.html

    Woohoo!

  • Ron MillerRon Miller Professor Professor
    Looks good! :)
    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher
    Thanks, Ron (and Maggie!)
  • SeamusSeamus Creator Creator
    Yeah, final result looks great!
    Tim Reinholt Author of Pow, a ski bum heist adventure
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher Teacher
    Thanks, Seamus! I had a lot of good guidance in making the idea develop into the final result. BTW, all of you are mentioned on the acknowledgements page.
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