Using humour creatively

LarikaLarika Bibliophile
edited November 2018 in General Discussions
I think if you really believe in something, the best way for the writer, artist or songwriter to get the message across is to use humour, like we can see in this video.       I wish I could do that!!!
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Comments

  • Possibly. The best adverts on TV are the funny ones. But not everything is seen as funny by everyone. It's very easy to offend some people. I think some live to be offended. The worst people are those who think they have a sense of humour, but don't.
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    i think Amando is right some people have a "comedy brain." In my writer's group we have 3 people who have "comedy brains." I wonder if one can develop a "comedy brain."
  • In humor, I find that there are levels or degrees. The lowest common denominator is the pie in the face, and it can be laughed at by all. From there, humor becomes progressively more subtle, and as the humor becomes more subtle, it unfortunately becomes more exclusive.

    Some people, even intelligent people, simply can't react to humor. I explained this to my doctor, using as an illustration the pun, "I guess aorta get a new joke." He immediately asked, "What's wrong with your aorta?" This was a very intelligent man, who made and appreciated puns, but when confronted by one, his first reaction was diagnostic.

    Or I remarked to a coworker, a psychiatric social worker, that I knew a man who fell off a roof and came down with the shingles; his brother fell off the chimney and came down with the flu(e). "Aw," she said, "That's terrible. Are they alright?" Again, her training had conditioned her to miss the humor, invoking sympathy rather than amusement.

    The most exclusive form of humor is the ironic dry wit, which poses the risk of being too subtle and missing the audience entirely. Case in point, Puddin'head Wilson wanting to poison half a dog...

    Interestingly, humor can be conveyed at several levels at the same time, thus hitting all audiences, and still maintaining a degree of plausibility. One example of this is the movie of the Monty Python Flying Circus, which at one level showed absolute slapstick, but at another level raised social and relational parody to great heights. I was just laughing with a coworker the other day about Monty Python's Quest for the Holy Grail, an absolutely hilarious movie.

    So I say that to say this: A sense of humor (or sins of humor, according to my coworkers) can be developed, though it does require time, a sense of irony, and the careful parsing of casual remarks.
  • So I say that to say this: A sense of humor (or sins of humor, according to my coworkers) can be developed, though it does require time,

    I am not sure it can.

  • "The lowest common denominator is the pie in the face," I disagree, I believe it is the Pun, or perhaps Knock knock jokes.  :)
    Tim Reinholt Author of Pow, a ski bum heist adventure
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    I agree Skoob, Monty Python was very funny but did you find their "Life of Brian" funny or offensive?
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited November 2018
    I am so aware of the limited time in each day and in a human’s lifespan, Skoob. Have I “time” to develop this “comedy brain” I wonder. I have a sense of humour but that doesn't mean I can write comic stories or make up funny songs with a message. Maybe if it is possible, one must start at a young age. 

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited November 2018
    My writing group has been invited to read some of our stories and poems to a class of children from our local Primary school. I want to get across the message that it's much better to live in the real world than on social media. (Which they can do when they are old like me.) I have written this--

    Advice to the Young
    When I was just a young girl,
    We didn't have a phone.
    No television in our house.
    Computers were unknown.

    At last we got a TV,
    A black and white affair.
    We watched it every evening,
    But it wasn't very clear.

    It ran for just a little while
    And after suppertime,
    We'd sit before our telly.
    It really was sublime.

    No central heating in our house.
    A coal fire warmed us up.
    We climbed the stairs to rooms so cold,
    With hot cocoa in a cup.

    When I was just a young girl,
    I did not sit alone
    In front of a computer.
    I always liked to roam.

    We played our games out in the street,
    Or in a nearby park.
    We shared a bike and had such fun,
    Not cloistered in the dark.

    When thinking of my early years,
    Life was just a game.
    Now life is complex for the kids.
    It really is a shame.

    Some boast about their smartphones,
    Their computer, their, iPad.
    And spend their days locked in their room.
    It really is quite sad.

    Please go outside and join your friends.
    Don't sit locked in your room.
    Just playing on your laptop,
    In the darkness and the gloom.

    When you grow old and cannot do
    The things you did before.
    That's when you'll sit inside your house
    Behind your bedroom door.

    You'll spend your time on laptops.
    You'll telephone a friend.
    So young ones please take my advice
     Let isolation end.

    Don't spend your time on Facebook,
    Or "tweet" your best crony.
    The social media friend you make
    Perhaps he'll be a phony.

    He could be very dangerous,
    Choose real friends you know.
    Don't dwell on social media
    It can drag you down quite low.

    Don't live inside the internet.
    Or glued to your smartphone.
    Go out into the real world
    For soon you will be grown.

     Not the greatest poetry I know, but children love rhyming verse. It would definitely be better if I could have written it using humour. 
    PS. I hope I don't get pelted with their packed lunches!
  • I found Life of Brian very funny, and right to the point.
  • I suppose one can learn what is funny. Some famous comedians test out their lines at tiny venues, like pubs, and they strike off anything that no one laughs at. Does that mean they are funny, or just learning what people laugh at? Does that mean they are not funny performers? Often when they are being interviewed, they say nothing funny at all.

    This chap makes it up as he goes along and is funny all the time >> 

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    Gosh Kevin I would hate to be in his audience. He might pick on me!! chuckle,
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited November 2018
    I too found Life of Brian.very funny.
  • Gosh Kevin I would hate to be in his audience. He might pick on me!! chuckle,

    All standups do it, Just don't sit at the front.


  • The above is 'rude' by the way.
  • Seamus said:
    "The lowest common denominator is the pie in the face," I disagree, I believe it is the Pun, or perhaps Knock knock jokes.  :)
    But a knock-knock or a pun, either one, require the reader to use a certain amount of reasoning, in order to spot the incongruity (and humor is simply a spontaneous reaction to the sudden revelation of an incongruity).
  • Larika said:
    I agree Skoob, Monty Python was very funny but did you find their "Life of Brian" funny or offensive?
    Both.

    In one sense, they were ridiculing a religious Figure of Whom I am very fond. But for the most part, they were ridiculing the Greco-Roman world in which that Figure arose. The scene where the Zelotes (Zealots) were trying to list the things the Romans had done for them was very funny.

    I am able to see the humor even in things that offend me.
  • Larika said:
    I am so aware of the limited time in each day and in a human’s lifespan, Skoob. Have I “time” to develop this “comedy brain” I wonder. I have a sense of humour but that doesn't mean I can write comic stories or make up funny songs with a message. Maybe if it is possible, one must start at a young age. 
    I find humor to be more about one's attitude than one's age. If we see humor in things we can learn to express that humor. I would say that the first step is to be able to tell a joke properly, and if a ten-year-old can learn it, a twenty-something like yourself should have no trouble at all.
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    "a twenty-something like yourself should have no trouble at all." I wish!!!! chuckle
  • I find humor to be more about one's attitude than one's age. If we see humor in things we can learn to express that humor. I would say that the first step is to be able to tell a joke properly, and if a ten-year-old can learn it, a twenty-something like yourself should have no trouble at all.

    I would say it's more about one's intelligence. Able to actually understand a joke. But also experience so one can relate to a joke. Few comics nowadays tell jokes, anyway.


  • Tell you what, Larika:

    You write a scene in which someone says something funny. Then let the rest of us constructively suggest how it might be more humorous.

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited November 2018
    I take your point about "personal" comments Kevin, they can be very hurtful. My husband's attitude is "What the ---- do I care about what people think about me! I often get exasperated with him and will sometimes say something "tongue in cheek" and we're still together after over 50 years!!! All I know is that both you and Skoob have helped a lot of people here in the forum, myself included. When people first enter Lulu to make a book, many find certain things very difficult, but folk like you and Skoob make their "rite of passage" so much easier.
  • I take your point about "personal" comments Kevin, they can be very hurtful. My husband's attitude is "What the ---- do I care about what people think about me!

    Very true, but there's no reason people should say it on line, etc., I don't. It ruins often interesting chats. It creates a WTF?! where did that comment come from?! effect.

     I often get exasperated with him and will sometimes say something "tongue in cheek" and we're still together after over 50 years!!!

    He says negative things about you on line?!

     All I know is that both you and Skoob have helped many people here in the forum, myself included.

    I hope so. But it cannot be good when all the silent viewers see occasional childish remarks. Are we not supposed to be adults?

     When people first enter Lulu to make a book, many find certain things very difficult, but folk like you and Skoob make their "rite of passage" so much easier.

    Perhaps. Wherever the askers are nowadays! If it was not for all the discussions, childish or not, this place would be dead!

  •  BTW. Was that you writing "something funny"?   :P
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    clue (IT= it makes----)
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