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Amazon FBA

Has anyone used (or is anyone using) 'Fulfilment by Amazon' to sell print books?

Thinking about ordering 50 copies to test the market.

Thanks, Norm.

Comments

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Not sure what you mean by that.

     

    A book put in to Amazon's hands is fulfilled by them, and that happens with a Lulu ISBN.

  • Fulfilled by Amazon = print books ahead of time so that they are in stock in Amazon warehouses allowing for overnight shipping.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Interesting. I have asked retailers how and why they say they have stocks of my POD books, but they do not reply.

     

    But, surely as soon as a POD book is printed, even if only for stock, that should be counted as a sale to the retailer? Normally retailers only get stock if they buy them.

     

     

  • Oh Kevin - so unimaginative?

    FBA is like selling anything in the Amazon marketplace - think used books.

     

    The author would indeed pay for the printing of the books upfront. The books will then be listed for sale on Amazon (at the author's desired price) as a book that is in stock. When an order is received, the book will be packed and shipped from the Amazon warehouse.

     

    There are several benefits to FBA including inexpensive shipping costs, overnight delivery, and the ability to return a book and receive a refund. 

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Oh Kevin - so unimaginative?

     

    I have no idea what you mean by that. What's that got to do with retailers who stock new POD books? If they have stock then they must have bought them to stock, so why does it not show as a sale? A retailer is a customer just the same as an end-user is.

     

    FBA is like selling anything in the Amazon marketplace - think used books.

     

    I am thinking new POD books, that supposedly do not exist until one is bought and paid for. It nothing to do with used books.

     

    The author would indeed pay for the printing of the books upfront.

     

    But that was not mentioned. The subject is Amazon (and other places that list POD books as being in stock, and a specific number also, usually 3 on E-bay for some reason) stocking new POD books. But the author pays? Why should they? Amazon is the retailer, if they wish to carry books in stock they should pay for them, and from publishers I suspect they do.

     

    The books will then be listed for sale on Amazon (at the author's desired price) as a book that is in stock.

     

    Are you saying that this is an Amazon Createspace option nothing to do with Lulu?

     

    Then the retailer should pay for the books they have in stock. In principle Amazon is a retailer of our Lulu created books, not the publisher, and yet 100s of sites like them say they have Lulu created POD books in stock. If one counted up the total number of books all these places say they have in stock it would amount to sales of 1000s, just to retailers.

     

    When an order is received, the book will be packed and shipped from the Amazon warehouse.

     

    There are several benefits to FBA including inexpensive shipping costs, overnight delivery, and the ability to return a book and receive a refund. 

     

    I am sure there is, to the retailer and the buyer, but no POD book should be printed unless the retailer pays for it. If they do not pay for it then that's theft if the writer/publisher has not agreed to FBA. Are you saying that Lulu does have an FBA agreement with Amazon?

  • I should have known better than to respond, but perhaps you should look up what FBA is and how it works.

     

    POD is POD whether it is printed in advance by the author or when purchased by a reader. FBA only ships and stores what you send to them to ship and store. Its not that difficult of a concept. Think EBay where the stuff you are selling is stored, picked, packed and shipped from an EBay warehouse rather than you packing and shipping the items you are selling. FBA is the same concept.

     

    Here is more information on FBA if you have a real interest in learning more:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/?nodeId=106096011&sr=1-1&ref=spkl_3_1_2076458402&qid=1438949872&pf_rd_p=2076458402&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_t=301&pf_rd_s=desktop-signpost&pf_rd_r=1ZQPEKBNT1YMTJRDTT76&pf_rd_i=fulfilled+by+amazon

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Why would you not want to respond. Put your paranoid hat on for a moment.

     

    I have read it. But the crux of the matter is. Is it something that Lulu allows sites like Amazon to do? Print POD books for stock but not pay for them? Lulu being the official publisher and Amazon actually owning POD machines (and Ingrams do also.)

  • If an author chooses to purchase their books and offer them for sale as printed books using the Fulfilled by Amazon service, they can do it by simply purchasing the books at their author discount and shipping them to the Amazon facility. Just as if they were selling vases or vacuum cleaners or pot holders in the Amazon marketplace.

     

    There is nothing POD about this service other than how the books are initially printed.

    Best wishes to the original poster. I hope he has found this conversation helpful.

     

    I don't have a paranoid hat. Paranoid is not my color.

    And with that, my contributions to this thread are ended.

     

     

  • AppleApple Reader
    I think the answer is that bookstores list the items as in stock if they can get them and have them shipped out in the required time frame.  As long as they advertise a 5 day handling time then all LULU printed books are technically in-stock at all online bookstores.  FBA is another issue.  It allows sellers to buy books that can be sent out immediately making customers more likely to buy while also eliminating the higher fees associated with LULU's worldwide distribution program.  You can either buy and sell the books yourself or send them to a fulfillment company like Amazon's FBA program or their competitors such as ShipBob.  Amazon is more expensive but includes free shipping to Amazon customers and 2 day shipping to Prime members and Amazon where half of most books are sold
  • AppleApple Reader
    These bookstores may not actually purchase your book until they sell a copy but they are purchasing advertising which helps your sales no matter who is doing the actual selling.  Buyers feel more comfortable making a purchase of an item they see advertised by multiple sellers and it helps make them aware of them.  Since these sellers are willing to pay to advertise any book they can get I would suggest using them by setting your retail (and thus wholesale) price slightly high on LULU's global distribution program and then undercut their price when you list your own copies for sale.  Of course if you don't want to bother with the hassles of paying for advertising and/or inventory and the hassles of shipping items then set a reasonable retail price and let these bookstores do all the selling for you.  It's your choice.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    It's somewhat hard for places like Amazon to offer Next Day Delivery if they do not stock books, but they do own Createspace and are a POD printer, so there's no real need for them to hold stock, unless it takes too long for Createspace to create a book. None of this matters to ebooks, though.
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