Book Cover - Image Resize Problem - Using Photoshop

Hi all,

 

I'm trying to upload my cover in the Lulu cover designer.

 

The system is seeking an image in the following size - 892.951 x 666 points

 

However, when I go to Image - Resize in photoshop - it won't let me choose this exact configuration.

 

I can choose either 892.951 or 666 - but not both at the same time.  When I try to correct the second dimension, the first automatically changes as I type!

 

Does anyone have any ideas as to how I can fix this?

 

It may very well be a simple fix, however I'm not the best with Photoshop / Lulu...

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Ken

 

 

Comments

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country Librarian

    Inkscape and GIMP are good for sizing alternatives, but if you get one size right and the other slightly over, it should upload.


    Kdoc76 wrote:

    Hi all,

     

    I'm trying to upload my cover in the Lulu cover designer.

     

    The system is seeking an image in the following size - 892.951 x 666 points

     

    However, when I go to Image - Resize in photoshop - it won't let me choose this exact configuration.

     

    I can choose either 892.951 or 666 - but not both at the same time.  When I try to correct the second dimension, the first automatically changes as I type!

     

    Does anyone have any ideas as to how I can fix this?

     

    It may very well be a simple fix, however I'm not the best with Photoshop / Lulu...

     

    Thanks in advance,

     

    Ken

     

     


     

  • When you select Resize Image, make sure to de-select "constrain proportions," from the dialogue box that pops up. Then you can enter whatever values you like. That's the way it works in Photoshop Elements, I don't think it would be different in Photoshop.

  • Also, bear in mind that, when resizing, your image quality will deteriorate. Photoshop is very good at converting up but less good converting down unless you have dpi to spare. Best idea is to create custom file at those exact point size (892.951 x 666) and at 300 dpi.  I believe Lulu provide photoshop templates at that size.
  • venessamossvenessamoss Reader
    edited January 7
    @Quillmonkey - where would i find their photoshop templates? Any template I see that they provide are seperate front cover and back cover PNG's....?

    Also - per Lulu: "The more complex the PDF, the greater chance that the process of converting, or rasterizing, it for print will generate errors. If you've created a cover PDF that uses fonts and separate images, your best option is to open the PDF in Photoshop — it will automatically ask for DPI (300 is optimal) and color palette (choose RGB). It will then rasterize the file to a single layer."

    Is it not strange that you'd design in photoshop with RGB not CMYK for a print design?

    Thanks so much for your help! Or anyone's help! :)
  • Can you swap to one of the other sizing options? I don't even have an option for points, but I can size in inches, cms, and pixels. I also find that the system does accept files very slightly out, by slightly I mean just a pixel or two, of course much more and it does reject it. I know total accuracy is the desired end result, but (potentially) gumming up the works is the whopping 0.375 inches allowed as 'the norm' in possible cover file shift at the printers, (most of mine have printed with only a very slight shift, but I have had orders where the cover has shifted the full amount allowed). All in all, I think a wayward pixel or two at this end is neither here nor there.
  • venessamoss said:
    @Quillmonkey - where would i find their photoshop templates? Any template I see that they provide are seperate front cover and back cover PNG's....?

    Also - per Lulu: "The more complex the PDF, the greater chance that the process of converting, or rasterizing, it for print will generate errors. If you've created a cover PDF that uses fonts and separate images, your best option is to open the PDF in Photoshop — it will automatically ask for DPI (300 is optimal) and color palette (choose RGB). It will then rasterize the file to a single layer."

    Is it not strange that you'd design in photoshop with RGB not CMYK for a print design?

    Thanks so much for your help! Or anyone's help! :)
    You can get the dimensions for a one-piece cover at the beginning of your project. After you enter the page count in the manufacturing cost box, click on 'Spine Measurements.' It will show the dimensions for your book, including the width of the spine. Use those numbers to create a new Photoshop file, in 300 DPI. Another way is to download a Createspace template for the same trim size and page length and adjust the dimensions to the ones Lulu provides (this is important, the companies use different paper stock, so the paper thickness will be different, which affects the width of the spine). Create your cover in RGB. Make a copy of it, then flatten the layers and export as a PDF in CMYK.    
     
  • Hello, HJ, things change over time I know, but when I first joined here, one golden piece of advice was never to convert from RGB to CMYK or vice versa; just choose one and stick to it. I think the advice went further, advising to use CMYK as that tied in with all Lulu's print partners. I've never stuck to that last caution, as I construct images in RGB rather than CMYK and thankfully never had problems. But I believe changing from one profile to the other in mid flow as it were, can cause the shade replication to be out a tad in the final printed book.
  • John Haines said:
     But I believe changing from one profile to the other in mid flow as it were, can cause the shade replication to be out a tad in the final printed book.
    The color is always off anyway because the printer converts an RGB file to CMYK. This is a new method I'm trying. By converting it myself, my goal is to make adjustments and have something a little closer to what was originally created in RGB. I just finished a new cover and still need to test it out.  
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