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Spiffies and Loonies

Thanks to Skoob_Ym, I have been able to publish a new edition of my situational comedy Spiffies and Loonies. Feel free to criticize.  Smiley Wink

 

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/POTET?searchTerms=spiffies+and+loonies

 

  Spiffies and Loonies is a situational comedy developed into 88 episodes. It departs from the typical ones, in which the plot hinges on the emotional and irrational decisions made by the lead characters. The opposite happens here. First of all, Brad and Dolly meet, fall in love and marry. To make things worse, they become rich after a few episodes. They are therefore geared to lead the eventless life of the happy few. Fortunately they are surrounded by misfits warped by one big deviant trait. When these do not bump into Brad and Dolly along the way, they will come and knock on their door – thus a turmoil of events running from the amusing to the fantastic, with a lot of absurdities in between.You will soon be captivated by the antics of these cartoon-like characters, and will ask for more. Several passages are spoofs of literary works. Each episode is independent enough from the others to be read or performed for its own sake.

 

Comments

  • potetjppotetjp Bibliophile

    I have just realized my situational comedy "unwittingly" passed the Bechdel Test (two women talking about something other than a man) because Dolly and Liz talk about unemployment in one episode, and Lady Orville discloses to Dolly she is Miss Jones's heir. At least two other episodes fail it - when Miss Jones tells Dolly she is despaired because her fiancé is dying of cancer, and the one when Dolly and Liz chat about Brad and their active sex life.

  • "First of all, Brad and Dolly meet, fall in love and marry. To make things worse..."

     

    Meeting, falling in love and marrying is a bad thing?

  • potetjppotetjp Bibliophile

    Ron Miller a écrit :

    "First of all, Brad and Dolly meet, fall in love and marry. To make things worse..."

     

    Meeting, falling in love and marrying is a bad thing?


    Smiley Happy  For the dynamics of a story, if it stops at that, yes, it's a lot of bad things, because literature thrives on unhappiness, madness, hatred, envy, jealousy, problems, conflicts, revolts, crimes, etc. "On ne fait pas de bonne littérature avec des bons sentiments." (André GIDE) = Good literature is not made with good feelings.

    As my book is a comedy, the comic is more often present than the tragic, and the story just stops when it threatens to degenerate into a tragedy.


  • Ron Miller wrote:

    "First of all, Brad and Dolly meet, fall in love and marry. To make things worse..."

     

    Meeting, falling in love and marrying is a bad thing?


    There is a strong sense of irony throughout the series. Everything that befalls Brad and Dolly "makes matters worse" in one sense or another, until they meet "A genius living in a colourless world, feasting on roasted grasshoppers." (I hope that's not a spoiler, but it is my favorite line in the series).

     

    If Benny Hill and Albert Camus collaborated with W.B. Yeats, this series might result... Smiley Happy

  • potetjppotetjp Bibliophile

    Skoob_Ym a écrit :

    Ron Miller wrote:

    "First of all, Brad and Dolly meet, fall in love and marry. To make things worse..."

     

    Meeting, falling in love and marrying is a bad thing?


    There is a strong sense of irony throughout the series. Everything that befalls Brad and Dolly "makes matters worse" in one sense or another, until they meet "A genius living in a colourless world, feasting on roasted grasshoppers." (I hope that's not a spoiler, but it is my favorite line in the series).

     

    If Benny Hill and Albert Camus collaborated with W.B. Yeats, this series might result... Smiley Happy


    Thanks a lot; you are so kind.

     

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