creating a LGBT character.

A police chief, former detective. I watch Monk on TV and played LA Noire. .... the character's nickname is "Humperdink" (a Prince from an 80s movie had the same name) and his real name is Sam Rains. He used to be in Narcotics and his romantic/ job partner Billy was killed while on duty with Sam under-cover.

 

Some of his subordinates are framed for a murder and one of them offers up his "fig leaf" for an exoneration. Sam gets a lot of crap for being out.... I wanted to have a Chief who wasn't your typical shouting, angry idiot like they show in movies. I'm also a fan of Commissoner Gordon as depicted in certain 1980s milestone Batman stories.

 

Do you think it'd work?

Comments

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    As long as the character is believable in terms of how he does his job, why not?

     

    I've known a few detectives who are nothing like the characters in movies or on TV.


    facsmth wrote:

    A police chief, former detective. I watch Monk on TV and played LA Noire. .... the character's nickname is "Humperdink" (a Prince from an 80s movie had the same name) and his real name is Sam Rains. He used to be in Narcotics and his romantic/ job partner Billy was killed while on duty with Sam under-cover.

     

    Some of his subordinates are framed for a murder and one of them offers up his "fig leaf" for an exoneration. Sam gets a lot of crap for being out.... I wanted to have a Chief who wasn't your typical shouting, angry idiot like they show in movies. I'm also a fan of Commissoner Gordon as depicted in certain 1980s milestone Batman stories.

     

    Do you think it'd work?


     


  • SphinxCameron wrote:

    As long as the character is believable in terms of how he does his job, why not?

     

    I've known a few detectives who are nothing like the characters in movies or on TV.



    Well, the interesting part is the vilain is a being wth some abilities on par with Q from Star Trek: The Next Generation....  wackiness ensues.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    If you have someone trying to help the cop as unobtrusively as possible, who also has some similar abilities to the villain, the story could take some surprising twists in direction.

     

    In real life there tends to be those "What the hell just happened?" moments.


    facsmth wrote:

    SphinxCameron wrote:

    As long as the character is believable in terms of how he does his job, why not?

     

    I've known a few detectives who are nothing like the characters in movies or on TV.



    Well, the interesting part is the vilain is a being wth some abilities on par with Q from Star Trek: The Next Generation....  wackiness ensues.


     

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    In creating a character -- any character -- it is important to know the sort of person who you intend the character to be. Some do this by writing a detailed biography of teh character. He was born in Yonkers, moved to Tucson, grew up in Des Moines; when he was 8 he thought he saw a UFO, when he was twelve he took his first airplane ride, and he loved it, when he was sixteen he went to the prom with... ?

     

    And so forth. You get the idea.

     

    The point is that the character must be so real that you can imagine not only what he would say, but how he would say it, and what he would be thinking about it.

     

    In this story, it appears that the character's sexuality is part and parcel of the story, so it would naturally be a subject for discussion.

     

    What you want to avoid is the sort of thing that occured in one episode of Law and Order. At the end of the episode, Fred Thompson's character tells Elizabeth Roehm's character that she is fired. Out of the blue, Roehm's character says, "Is this because I'm a lesbian?"  Now, until that point, there had been no mention of Roehm's character's sexuality. So throwing that line on at the end was pointless, gratuitous, clunky, and mildly asinine. On the other hand, had the storyline concerned lesbianism, and had the character either been involved with or attracted to one of the suspects / victims / witnesses / etc., then the line would have made sense.

     

    Anything about sexuality, if it must be in the story, should grow organically from the story.

  • To add a twist to your story, the arch-villain could be gay, and would appeal to the officer's sense of solidarity in their community. Of course, the officer would flatly refuse, owing to his strong sense of duty, and the arch-villain would then try to blackmail him.

  • The arch-villain is a misogynist who might consider the hero's sexuality to be a way of solidifying his own world view. The bad guy would hate women and kill them for the sake of not wanting to reproduce. And he just hasn't conisered any alternatives in sexuality. 
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