Books in Hebrew or Arabic

Some languages such as Arabic and Hebrew are written and read from right to left and from what we term as the back to the front.

This guide shows how such books can be created and printed using Lulu.

Click here.

 

Comments

  • That link is not working anymore. Can someone tell me how to insure that the binding is on the right side?

     

    I'll tell some history about my project. I created my book in MS Word. Last year I printed it myself at an office-supply store. In Word, I used Page Setup / Margins / Pages / Multiple pages, and set it to "2 pages per sheet". And somewhere in there, there's a "Right-to-Left" option. This way, I printed my book onto 11x17-inch sheets, folded it in half, and got a great 8.5x11 booklet. Because of the RTL option, all the page numbers were correct, and it automatically went RTL correctly.

     

    But here on Lulu, this "multiple pages" thing doesn't exist. Each page is individual, and anyone printing a pile of pages would probably not realize that the book is to be bound on the right side. I said "probably", because I added a gutter of 0.2 inches on the inner side, but that might not get noticed.

     

    So how do I insure that Lulu binds it properly? The process seems to be too straightforward - it's like "Upload your file and we'll do the rest." I wish there was an RTL option on screen somewhere, or at least a freeform text box for "Special Instructions".

     

    Thanks!

    Keeves

  • That link is not working anymore.

     

    Well it was posted many years ago.

     

    Can someone tell me how to insure that the binding is on the right side?

     

    I assume you mean on the right-hand side? It's not possible. What you have to do is create the contents so they start at what is actually the back of the book. They would also have to be upside down.

     

     

    I'll tell some history about my project. I created my book in MS Word. Last year I printed it myself at an office-supply store. In Word, I used Page Setup / Margins / Pages / Multiple pages, and set it to "2 pages per sheet". And somewhere in there, there's a "Right-to-Left" option. This way, I printed my book onto 11x17-inch sheets, folded it in half, and got a great 8.5x11 booklet. Because of the RTL option, all the page numbers were correct, and it automatically went RTL correctly.

     

    Well, what you are describing is what POD printing machines do automatically using a Print Ready PDF. But the machines cannot use files set up, say, as two A4s created on one A3. You have to create a file of pages (and I would suggest as a docx or PDF) of the size of the actual book. I can command my own printing machine to print last page first, upside down, etc etc, but that option is not available here.

     

    But here on Lulu, this "multiple pages" thing doesn't exist. Each page is individual, and anyone printing a pile of pages would probably not realize that the book is to be bound on the right side.

     

    Well no, because most books are not bound on the right-hand side. I have seen people reading books in Hebrew etc, and the books are bound on the left. I don't see what difference it makes as long as the story is in the right order. Read page one, which is at the front, binding on the left, text right to left or whatever, then flip over to page two. It's still the same text. (Can one even type right to left in Word?)

     

    I said "probably", because I added a gutter of 0.2 inches on the inner side, but that might not get noticed.

     

    That's would make no difference to the side a book is bound on.

     

    So how do I insure that Lulu binds it properly? The process seems to be too straightforward - it's like "Upload your file and we'll do the rest." I wish there was an RTL option on screen somewhere, or at least a freeform text box for "Special Instructions".

     

    Lulu's Wizards create using what you upload to them. If you want special formatting, then that is done on the file before you upload it in the same manner as if I wanted columns.

     

     

     

     

     


  • kevinlomas wrote: 

    Well no, because most books are not bound on the right-hand side.

     

    In the English-speaking world, that's true. But the opposite is true where right-to-left languages are used. It's simply a local convention.

     

    I have seen people reading books in Hebrew etc, and the books are bound on the left. I don't see what difference it makes as long as the story is in the right order. Read page one, which is at the front, binding on the left, text right to left or whatever, then flip over to page two. It's still the same text. (Can one even type right to left in Word?)

     

    If one's PC has right-to-left languages enabled, then Yes, one would type a letter, and then the insertion point goes to the left of the just-typed letter. And in MS Word, many of the dialog boxes will have options for right-to-left or left-to-right. For example, if I divide a page into columns, the first column can be the rightmost. And in the book I am working on, if I tell Word to display multiple pages on the screen, they'll go from right to left.

     

    As far as whether the binding is on the right or left, and your suggestion to keep the pages in sequence, and simply flip to the next one: I suspect that we are conditioned by the sequence of the letters and words on the page. When you're on the last line at the bottom of the page, and you read across the page and get to the last word, you naturally keep going in the same direction to continue reading. For example: If you are reading a regular English book, and you are reading the page on the left side, when you get to the bottom line, it ends near the binding, so you naturally skip across the binding and go to the top of the next page without turning and leaves. But when you get to the end of the page on the right, you're at the outside margin, so naturally you want to flip the page. Everything would go backwards if the words of each line began on the right and ended on the left. If you want to experience this, simply take a stack of English papers and staple them together on the right. If the pages are double-sided, I guarantee you'll go nuts. (A stack of one-sided sheets is not as bad.)

     

    Another much less technical reason for caring so much about the binding is simple habit. When people are used to flipping pages in a particular way, they're not going to be happy changing only for this one particlar book.

     

    Lulu's Wizards create using what you upload to them. If you want special formatting, then that is done on the file before you upload it in the same manner as if I wanted columns.

     

    The kind of formatting you are talking about - and columns is an excellent example - refers to how the content of each page is arranged. My situation refers to how the pages are arranged among themselves.

  • kevinlomas wrote: 

    Well no, because most books are not bound on the right-hand side.

     

    In the English-speaking world, that's true.

     

    Not only English. (See below.)

     

    But the opposite is true where right-to-left languages are used. It's simply a local convention.

     

    That's perhaps the keyword >> Local. Most publishing houses are international and use international conventions., and Lulu is American  Smiley Happy

     

    I have seen people reading books in Hebrew etc, and the books are bound on the left. I don't see what difference it makes as long as the story is in the right order. Read page one, which is at the front, binding on the left, text right to left or whatever, then flip over to page two. It's still the same text. (Can one even type right to left in Word?)

     

    If one's PC has right-to-left languages enabled, then Yes, one would type a letter, and then the insertion point goes to the left of the just-typed letter. And in MS Word, many of the dialog boxes will have options for right-to-left or left-to-right.

     

    Will it auto add New Pages and flow text to them though? If not then a lot of messing is demanded.

     

    For example, if I divide a page into columns, the first column can be the rightmost. And in the book I am working on, if I tell Word to display multiple pages on the screen, they'll go from right to left.

     

    Handy. Create your text within one column that fully fills the margins then? Would that work?

     

    As far as whether the binding is on the right or left, and your suggestion to keep the pages in sequence, and simply flip to the next one: I suspect that we are conditioned by the sequence of the letters and words on the page.

     

    It just seems natural, perhaps that's why most traditional publishing houses do it that way then? Right to left text just seems a strange idea and one has to wonder if the first Hebrew scribe was left handed? (No smudges.) But originally it was all done on separate scrolls, not on pages. A 'book' used to be one scroll. (I will not go into clay tablets etc  Smiley Very Happy  )

     

    When you're on the last line at the bottom of the page, and you read across the page and get to the last word, you naturally keep going in the same direction to continue reading. For example: If you are reading a regular English book, and you are reading the page on the left side, when you get to the bottom line, it ends near the binding, so you naturally skip across the binding and go to the top of the next page without turning and leaves. But when you get to the end of the page on the right, you're at the outside margin, so naturally you want to flip the page. Everything would go backwards if the words of each line began on the right and ended on the left. If you want to experience this, simply take a stack of English papers and staple them together on the right. If the pages are double-sided, I guarantee you'll go nuts. (A stack of one-sided sheets is not as bad.)

     

    Indeed. But the left to right habit was possibly spread from the start of Gutenberg and the printing of the Bible, which was left to right, and so on, and later, mass-printing. This is interesting because it also shows which nations use RTL or LTR.  http://www.i18nguy.com/temp/rtl.html

     

    Another much less technical reason for caring so much about the binding is simple habit. When people are used to flipping pages in a particular way, they're not going to be happy changing only for this one particlar book.

     

    I will assume you will be deliberately limiting your market then?

     

    Lulu's Wizards create using what you upload to them. If you want special formatting, then that is done on the file before you upload it in the same manner as if I wanted columns.

     

    The kind of formatting you are talking about - and columns is an excellent example - refers to how the content of each page is arranged. My situation refers to how the pages are arranged among themselves.

     

    Well, you can but experiment with your page formatting in word. It does not matter which side a book is bound because that depends on which way round you hold it.  Smiley Happy One problem you may face is that your cover images will have to be upside down and the front on the back, as seen in the Cover Wizards. If you want an ISBN you will have to use the Advanced One-Piece Cover Wizard or it will slap the ISBN on to what you want as the front cover.

     

    BTW. The Wizard will allow you to upload each page as a separate file, even as jpgs, if they are created as such that is.

Sign In or Register to comment.