Writer's Challenge #2: A traffic accident and a monkey.

The second challenge (now that the first is complete):

 

Write a brief scene -- just a couple of sentences -- describing a traffic accident that involves a monkey. The monkey must be an integral part of the action.

 

Extra points if you also work in a pineapple.

Comments

  • That's a hard one. Apart from an emulation of the Monkey King in the Chinese novel "Travel to the West" where he accompanies Pig and Tripitaka, I can't imagine stories with monkeys.

  • Simple.

     

    One day a monkey riding a bike ran over a pineapple.

     

    It would be better with a grape.

     

    One day a monkey riding a bike ran over a grape. The grape let out a little wine. (Sounds better when spoken.)

  • In one of William Trevor's novels, a pet monkey causes scandal at a business party. You have to be a good writer to make this good read.

  • Tires squealed, disturbing the otherwise tranquil afternoon. Cars, trucks, a moving van and a bus all did there best to avoid colliding with the little primate. With luck, they succeeded, and as abruptly as the noise and confusion arrived, it calmed. The bus driver leaned out his window and regarded the monkey—a short creature with a fez and dusty fur, dragging a large sack behind him. “You should watch where you’re going ape!”

     

    The monkey, seemingly unperturbed, smiled a toothy grin, reached into the sack, and pulled a pineapple from it. He spun the pineapple round and round by the frond, and hurled it at the bus. The pineapple, being nearly as large as the monkey, banged harmlessly off the side of the big vehicle. Still, the monkey seemed unperturbed. Someone—the driver of the van perhaps—gave a small laugh. The monkey smiled again and bound off, satchel jostling along behind him, destined for the next bustling intersection

  • In one of William Trevor's novels, a pet monkey causes scandal at a business party. You have to be a good writer to make this good read.

     

    Monkeys would perhaps be better behaved.

  • "Look what they had at the supermarket," said Jill, holding up a fresh pineapple. "Did you know that pineapples are the fruit of hospitality?"

     

    "Fruit of hosp -- what does that even mean?" asked Jack, taking his eyes off the road to look at the proferred pineapple.

     

    "It's like the fruit that you -- is that a monkey driving that truck?"

     

    Jack snapped his head around, trying to see what truck she meant, and whether the driver was a monkey. He saw it at last; a green Ford pickup cutting across his path. Mr. Pickles smiled, or gave what would have been a smile if he were human.

     

    Jack swerved, snapping the wheel left to avoid the truck. Jill screeched, dropping the pineapple and putting her hands on the headliner to brace against the turn. The car spun counterclockwise, its rear bumper scraping the door of the truck as it sailed past. Facing the wrong way, the car now tipped precariously, lifitng Jack's side, before slamming back into the pavement and coming to rest. Jack quickly shut off the engine.

     

    In his rear view mirror, he saw the monkey swerve to avoid going into the ditch, and then straighten into the lane.

     

    "He's leaving the scene of the accident," said Jill.

     

    "Did you see that?" replied Jack. "He didn't even use his turn signal!"

  • Someone else should set up writer's challenge #3...

  • A little bizarre to me. A monkey is driving a pickup; Jack doesn't understand the term "hospitality" and ... is he not a human? Barring this strangeness, the story is good read and well written with the proper graphically descriptive verbs.

    With only humans at the wheel and the monkey being a mere pet, I should have had the monkey at the back of Jack and Jill's car, first begging for the pineapple, then playing with it, until the roadhog driving the pickup tried to shove their car into the ditch. The monkey would then hurl the pineapple at him, causing him to end up in the ditch, where he'd be trapped in his cabin, and the engine would burst into flames. A couple of hours later, in front of the firemen, the police and tens of witnesses, the monkey would pick up his pineapple, climb up in a tree with it, and start eating. Jill would exclaim: "It's even tastier roasted."

  • I meant for it to be the phrase, "Fruit of hospitality" that Jack didn't understand... After all, what is particularly hospitable about a fruit, and especially one with a thorny rind?

     

    But it's a phrase one hears often, and pineapple shapes are often used to depict hotels, strangely enough...

     

    A bit of fun with a commonplace phrase, that's all...


  • potetjp wrote:

    A little bizarre to me. A monkey is driving a pickup; Jack doesn't understand the term "hospitality" and ... is he not a human? Barring this strangeness, the story is good read and well written with the proper graphically descriptive verbs.

    With only humans at the wheel and the monkey being a mere pet, I should have had the monkey at the back of Jack and Jill's car, first begging for the pineapple, then playing with it, until the roadhog driving the pickup tried to shove their car into the ditch. The monkey would then hurl the pineapple at him, causing him to end up in the ditch, where he'd be trapped in his cabin, and the engine would burst into flames. A couple of hours later, in front of the firemen, the police and tens of witnesses, the monkey would pick up his pineapple, climb up in a tree with it, and start eating. Jill would exclaim: "It's even tastier roasted."


    That's a good scenario... Smiley Very Happy


  • Skoob_Ym a écrit :

    I meant for it to be the phrase, "Fruit of hospitality" that Jack didn't understand... After all, what is particularly hospitable about a fruit, and especially one with a thorny rind?

    _____________________________________________

     

     

    I didn't know that. I thought Jack was an illiterate moron who didn't know any word of more than two syllables.

     

  • Absolute literal meaning of words and phrases can be amusing. "Her eyes were glued to the door." "He made a bolt for the window." "Her legs turned to jelly." "He was nailed with just one look." "They ran like the wind." Etc.


  • kevinlomas a écrit :

    Absolute literal meaning of words and phrases can be amusing. "Her eyes were glued to the door." "He made a bolt for the window." "Her legs turned to jelly." "He was nailed with just one look." "They ran like the wind." Etc.


    American animated cartoons used to have a lot of these literally represented, for instance Donald Duck having a bee in his bonnet, a character falling apart then gathering himself, etc. Played in countries where people don't speak English, these visual jokes were not understood, but perceived as foreign absurdities. I now wonder if such misundertandings have not spread the idea the average US citizen is definitely unhinged.

  • Hrmm, and yet the world understood Monty Python?

  • Not at all; we simply believe that you Brits live in a hinge-free world... Smiley Tongue

     

    I was just telling someone about the Monty Pythons the other day: A client and I were discussing them, and two of the young kids in the office were just flabbergasted by the bit about the clip-clop coconuts, how did the coconuts get here, maybe sparrows brought them, what is the carrying capacity of a sparrow, is that an English sparrow or a European sparrow, and so forth.

     

    I think they thought I was making it up...

  • Played in countries where people don't speak English, these visual jokes were not understood, but perceived as foreign absurdities.

     

    Now I come to think about it, what about silent films? Enjoyed and understood the world over?

  • I was just telling someone about the Monty Pythons the other day: A client and I were discussing them, and two of the young kids in the office were just flabbergasted by the bit about the clip-clop coconuts, how did the coconuts get here, maybe sparrows brought them, what is the carrying capacity of a sparrow, is that an English sparrow or a European sparrow, and so forth.

     

    I think they thought I was making it up...

     

    Some humour relies on the recipient having existing knowledge of many subjects, the coconut joke works on many levels, as long as one knows what's being implied.

     

    Slightly off subject. Those that dislike SF "Because it's not real", who still don't get it when the reply is, "But no fiction is real."

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