illustrations

potetjppotetjp Professor
edited June 19 in Author Workshop


As illustrated above, in the three volumes of my L'onirothèque de Quentin Cumber, in which I have simply recorded my dreams, I have inserted pictures unrelated to the contents of the dreams, but that do belong to the oniric field by their themes. Do you think it's a good idea? 
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  • A_A_CainA_A_Cain Oz Creator
    If they are thematically related to the dream content, I reckon that's a great idea. Images would add an extra layer to your dream descriptions - dreams (mine at least) being predominantly visual (and everyone's, I imagine, unique).

    What a great idea. I kept a dream diary for several years in my late teens, but the writing then was very prosaic. My erotica taps in on the same psychic content, decades later, but is more a fantasy diary than a dream diary.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    I think that when you publish a dream diary, you have automatically ventured into uncharted waters, and thus anything which does not distract from the story is automatically acceptable.

    That is to say, we expect dreams to be strange and even incomprehensible, thus the illustrations of such dreams would be as well.

    I often suspect that I have dreamed an intriguing scene, but I seldom remember it on waking, and if I do, it usually fades before I can record it. One morning I woke up speaking the numbers 40, 70, and 122, as if it were vitally important that I remember them. As insane as it sounds, I actually tried dialing the numbers 407-0122 and 704-0122 to see if I was recalling an important phone number (both were out of service). (122-4070 and 122-7040 are not permissible in the North American Dialing Plan.)

    To make a long story short: Use the illustrations.
  • potetjppotetjp Professor
    A_A_Cain said:
    My erotica taps in on the same psychic content, decades later, but is more a fantasy diary than a dream diary.
    Erotica is inevitable in dreams. A former colleague of mine, now retired and an amateur psychoanalist, bought a volume, and was appalled at the number of things I wrote that, according to him, should always be kept secret. I told him he reminded me of the thought police from George ORWELL's 1984.
  • SeamusSeamus Creator
    In my novel I included this illustration of a character floating down a river on an inner tube experiencing an LSD trip
    Tim Reinholt Author of Pow, a ski bum heist adventure
  • potetjppotetjp Professor
    Skoob_ym said:
    I often suspect that I have dreamed an intriguing scene, but I seldom remember it on waking, and if I do, it usually fades before I can record it. 
    As I am becoming rather old (approaching 80), I make fewer and fewer dreams, and they quickly evaporate in the minutes that follow wake-up.
  • A_A_CainA_A_Cain Oz Creator
    potetjp said:
    As I am becoming rather old (approaching 80), I make fewer and fewer dreams, and they quickly evaporate in the minutes that follow wake-up.
    Hmmm, not looking forward to that. I've always enjoyed a very rich (and strange) dream world. Coleridge's short piece on picking a flower in a strange and beautiful place always comes to mind.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    A_A_Cain said:
    potetjp said:
    As I am becoming rather old (approaching 80), I make fewer and fewer dreams, and they quickly evaporate in the minutes that follow wake-up.
    Hmmm, not looking forward to that. I've always enjoyed a very rich (and strange) dream world. Coleridge's short piece on picking a flower in a strange and beautiful place always comes to mind.
    Those that I recall after waking usually have a vivid emotional aspect. Oddly, until recently I could never read in my dreams, and attempting to read any kind of writing would awaken me. But lately I find that I can dream that I have read a certain text and that it said a certain thing.

    Or at least... I think I can...
  • potetjppotetjp Professor
    Skoob_ym said:
    Oddly, until recently I could never read in my dreams, and attempting to read any kind of writing would awaken me. But lately I find that I can dream that I have read a certain text and that it said a certain thing.

    I have never been able to remember what I read in dreams. On the other hand, I remember some sentences heard in French and some in foreign languages (English, Arabic, Tagalog). Once, in a dream, I was watching a TV program in which the Emperor and Empress of Japan were on the screen. Suddenly the Empress noticed something above the bottom margin of the screen. She looked horrified, and uttered a horrible shriek - she was terrorized by a sino-japanese character. Awake, I remembered it, and found it in Nelson's Japanese-English character dictionary: TAN "weak point, shortcoming", although this didn't tell me what weak point Her Majesty was so upset about.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    Since the Emperor and Empress were once believed to be divine, perhaps the very fact of having human shortcomings was terrifying. Or perhaps it reflects upon the fact that we all find ourselves at odds with our conscience from time to time -- even if we are Empresses.
  • Skoob_ym I was interested in your rnumbers dream.  Biblically those numbershave huge meaning.  40 referes to trials and tests: Jesus 40 day fast, Israel's 40 years in the wilderness.  70 is a number of Justice - Moses had 70 elders doing the work of bringing justice  into the community: Israel had 70 years in Babylon.  !22 is a picture of Genesis 1 to Revelation 22, the whole span of the Bible, so completion of the picture, end times.  I wonder if this makes any sense to you.  God often speaks in dreams.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    I also looked up Psalms 40, 70, and 122. Each had a common element of finding safety through worship (The safety theme in 122 is muted slightly because the purpose of a song of ascent is obscure to us today).
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    From something I wrote a long time ago.

    ONE: Stands for perfection; unity; God:

     

    TWO: As the first number to break away from the purity of one, is tagged to the Devil, and since odd numbers take precedence in addition (odd + even = odd) and addition also represents sexual union, then odd numbers must represent the male sex. (With me so far?):

     

    THREE: Therefore, is the first male number because one by itself, although 'perfect', is barren and two introduces a discord that can only be resolved by adding the two numbers together to make three. Which is as good an excuse as any:


     

    FOUR: Is the Pythagorean number for solid earth, being the number of points required to define the tetrahedron. But four is also the number of evil and bad luck, comprising two twos, in more ways than one - 4 = 2+2 = 2x2:

     

    FIVE: Is the number of male sexuality; it is made up of two and three: The first feminine number added to the first masculine number. Thus, in love, woman is given to man, and man 'naturally' dominates. So we have been right all along!:

     

    SIX: Is the first 'perfect' number, or the sum of its factors (numbers that divide without a remainder.) Therefore - 6 = 1+2+3. Perfect numbers were exalted for their tranquillity and harmoniousness. You may dispute this if you have six children:

     

    SEVEN: Is rich in biblical association. For a small example - There are 7 ‘Deadly Sins’; seven Christian virtues; seven petitions in the Lord’s prayer etc. Also the 7th son of 7th sons are said to have mystical powers. Coincidence?

    The reason such significance is put on seven is due to its possible link to man’s very survival and associated to one of the ways they measured the passing of time - The phases of the Moon takes about 28 days (4x7) to complete a full cycle. Birth, death, growth and decay, the four as yet, undisputed facts of life, are thought to have been reliant on the waxing and waning of the Moon. But note it is also linked to four (4x7) - solid earth and evil.

     

    EIGHT and NINE: Are associated with human procreation. Again, a dominant factor when survival often depended on family strength of numbers. The female body has eight orifices. (Look in a biology book or simply take more notice!) The eighth being the one new life enters the world. Eight is therefore said to be the number of worldly success. But can also be divided by 2 and 4, and 9 by 3. However we will not get too complex here. (What do you mean; "It is ALREADY complex!"):

     

    NINE: Is also the number of completeness because a human baby is conceived, created and born in nine months. Approximately:

     

     

    A few other numbers are also

    allowed significance -

     

    TWELVE: Is another number of completeness - 12 months; twelve tribes of Israel; 12 disciples; 12 'good men' etc:

     

    THIRTEEN: Goes one too many beyond completeness - There were 13 at the Last Supper for instance. Unlucky 13 etc. The significance of 13 predates Christ however:

     

    FORTY: Is also given significance. A lot in fact. The biblical flood lasted 40 days and 40 nights; Moses took 40 days to talk to God on Mount Sinai; the children of Israel walked for 40 years in the wilderness; Jesus was tempted by the Devil for 40 days and 40 nights.

    40 has been an important number since ancient Babylonian times. (That area of the planet is said to be the Cradle of Life, the place modern man originated from). Then it was known as 'Kissatum'. Translated as the - 'Excellent Quality'.


  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Let’s look at this closer - apparently 40 days is actually the period the star cluster Pleiades disappears from view. This, like eclipses, would have caused great consternation to people who were mainly governed by the things they could see, and not understand, particularly in the heavens. It also gave great power (and wealth) to those who could predict them (eventually they would become the local priests of some religion or other.) Agricultural periods used to be measured by this 40 day event. Crops were planted etc. Some still say to this day that a rainy St. Swithin’s day (15th July and linked to Pleiades) will be followed by 40 days of rain, too, and vice versa. Not necessarily accurate, but as good a time piece as any when you do not have digital wristwatches.


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