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  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    A good point. We do get away with it somewhat in medical and military terms since people expect these to be a bit technical. A surgeon can say that he "scrubbed in" and we make an assumption about what this means.


    Some terms can be obvious to a great number of people because they have been used in film and TV over the many years since the media was invented. There's countless medical things on TV.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_medical_drama_television_programs


     Or a doctor says that a patient had a sub-arachnoid bleed and we know that the patient is bleeding internally;

    You may know that. What is often said in non-medical fiction is "he's bleeding in!"  It has to be assumed that few people know what sub-arachnoid bleed means, and that writers realise that.

     if the given context is his brain, we know that the bleed is in the brain. We don't expect to have the structures of the brain explained to us, though a merciful character might explain to another character that "Doc says he's bleeding in his brain" thus giving us the final clue.

    A long time ago, people moaned that doctors in hospitals did not communicate enough or at all with patients and their visitors, so they were instructed to do so. Then they had to be told to dumb-down so that non-medical people knew what they were on about.

    But yes, we should let the reader in on the technical terms, but I would argue, without directly explaining them if possible. In BB&B, now that I think about it, the first explanation of LMFT is through what Bryly does (performing psychotherapy) and under whom she works (a psychologist). I don't believe that, as presented in the book, it jars the reader and sends them to google. At least, no reader has said so.

    Again using TV as an example. When medical staff are talking to each other, no one explains what they are on about, because medical staff don't need to, and that's just what it would be like in real-life to anyone overhearing them. They would not have a clue what is being said, and it's left at that.

    One reader did ask if LMFT should have been LSMFT (Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco), but that was tongue in cheek.

    They may now use that in slogans.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    "Church of Canterbury" was a poetic way of saying CoE.


    It made it sound like some stand-alone religion, not just the place where the religious head of the CoE is based.

     "Church of Nashville" is a poetic way of saying SBC. &c.

    There seems to be no such religious place, just lots of churches there.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    This could become a series like GK Chesterton’s Father Brown books. They were extremely popular.

    I assume they still are, because they keep making them in to TV series. (I pasted a link up above somewhere in this thread.)

    There's quite a few similar things, such as this >>   https://drama.uktv.co.uk/shows/cadfael/
  • Larika has a very good notion, there!

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  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Teacher
    edited January 17
    Larika said:

    Skoob you mentioned that you belong to the Church of Nashville which is evangelical. So are Pastor Jake and Bryly evangelicals too? This could become a series like GK Chesterton’s Father Brown books. They were extremely popular. Good Luck with your sequel.

    Thank you. I can only aspire to reach Chesterton's level. It's difficult not to make pastors "so heavenly-minded that they're no earthly good."

    Yes, Jake and Bryly are SBC. They met at the fictional Central Baptist Church, where Jake is the pastor. Pastors in general need some good press these days...
  • They may now use that in slogans.
    They used to: both the acronym and the slogan.
  • Larika has a very good notion, there!

    Thanks for the support. I'll start imagining a series of ecclesiastical pickles for them to fall into, so that they can adventure out of them.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    They may now use that in slogans.
    They used to: both the acronym and the slogan.

    That could be confusing.
  • They may now use that in slogans.
    They used to: both the acronym and the slogan.

    That could be confusing.
    Perhaps, but L.S./M.F.T. (the official version always had the slash and dots in it) first appeared in the mid-1940s and lasted for at least three decades. The ads almost invariably included the full phrase somewhere. So if might have been confusing initially, people certainly got used to it!
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  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    Well, tobacco adverts of any type are banned on the UK.
  • Well, tobacco adverts of any type are banned on the UK.
    Good!

    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Here, tobacco companies pay the local health departments to run Public Service Announcements on the dangers of smoking.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    Which immediately remind people they want a cig.
  • Where would the tobacco cessation departments be if no one smaoked?
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    They would find something else to campaign against. In the UK it's diesel engines.
  • Skoob_ym said:
    Where would the tobacco cessation departments be if no one smaoked?
    I have never smaoked.
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  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    It can be worse than smoking.
  • Skoob_ym said:
    Where would the tobacco cessation departments be if no one smaoked?
    I have never smaoked.
    If I could type I'd be dangerous.

    I once had a doctor ask about my smoking habits in light of family history. I told him that I've never felt an urge to stick burning leaves into my mouth.
  • When my wife was seeing a doctor recently, she was asked, "Have you ever smoked?" She said, "No, but I have smoldered."
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  • There was the man who was asked if he smoked after sex. He said, "I've never looked."
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    Always keep a fire extinguisher by the side of the bed, or only have sex in the bath.
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