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Let's all do a Trump

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Comments

  • Capitalisation is important too

    It depends how it's used.

  • Anyway all I'm suggesting, is that we do what President Trump does and use twitter. As the Lulu presenter says, we can publicise our books by using it. I'm not asking people  to do everything  President T does! 

    Like all manner of social media sites, people have to be made aware a posting has been made in order to bother looking at it.

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    There is a difference between the voting process and arriving at a consensus Kevin. All of us who publish with Lulu, reached a consensus on an issue posted here in the forums. The question asked was whether one should  use  a particular Publishing Academy, or avoid it. Luluers agreed that we would not use it.We reached that decision by participating in the decision-making process.We didn't vote, which may have left some of us dissatisfied. We engaged in a dialogue and shared information, so that all of us understood the issue. We arrived at a consensus, which takes longer, but in my opinion, is a much better process. 
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    Perhaps when a vote is just a Yes or a No, such a narrow gap in the results should make it nul and void?
    We live in a democracy and even though I personally didn't like the result of the Brexit vote, It cannot be made null and void. The Brexiters won the vote. Perhaps the only way to resolve the issue, is to have another public vote now that we are all better informed. It cannot be a consensus, so some people will still be left dissatisfied.
  • Democracy has a lot to answer for.

    A fine example was the UK vote to leave the EU. 48% voted No. 52% voted Yes. So Yes it was, leaving 48% of the British people deeply upset. 

    Well, yes, and even more of interest, England per se was almost entirely in favor, while Scotland and North Ireland -- and I believe Wales as well -- were almost entirely against. Again, a populous group in one area (England proper) over-rode the opinions of the rest of the nation.

    And this on the heels of a narrow decision by Scotland to stay in the UK. There was some thought of a renewed call for SCexit in light of Brexit so that Scotland could reunify with the EU, but apparently that was shot down fairly quickly.
  • Larika said:

    Yes it was, leaving 48% of the British people deeply upset.  
     Which is why I prefer consensus, but for a very large group of people ----impossible. It will have to be the vote. 
    It sounds a bit ironic to say, "Our System of Government -- Not Nearly As Bad As All The Rest!" :)
  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile
    edited December 2018
    Our System of Government -- Not Nearly As Bad As All The Rest!"  
    Yes Skoob,  in the UK there is a constitutional monarchy in which the reigning monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the head of state. However she does not make any open political decisions. All political decisions are taken by the government and Parliament. The UK  is governed within the framework of a parliamentary democracy  under a constitutional monarchy, while the Prime Minister of the UK, Theresa May, is the head of Her Majesty's Government. (Legally the UK is a constitutional monarchy, however practically it's a republic.)
     In the USA  there is a presidential republic. The US head of state is elected, as are the 2 houses.
     In the UK the queen or king is not elected, neither is the House of Lords. Some people in the UK would prefer an elected head of state and second house, like in the USA.
  • There is a difference between the voting process and arriving at a consensus Kevin.

    The difference is no one was asked to vote, but was the result not the same?  And in that was two or even three 'spins' by  the company's PR team to bend the results. Just like a real campaign really  :)

     All of us who publish with Lulu, reached a consensus on an issue posted here in the forums. The question asked was whether one should  use  a particular Publishing Academy, or avoid it. Luluers agreed that we would not use it.We reached that decision by participating in the decision-making process.We didn't vote, which may have left some of us dissatisfied.

    It doubt it left any actual Lulu user dissatisfied.

     We engaged in a dialogue and shared information, so that all of us understood the issue. We arrived at a consensus, which takes longer, but in my opinion, is a much better process. 

    But voting is just the same. Listen to and discuss the points, then vote. All a consensus is is people agreeing to something, but not voting at the end to seal it.

    Is there an emote here for a show of hands?   :)

  • We live in a democracy and even though I personally didn't like the result of the Brexit vote, It cannot be made null and void.

    It actually can.

     The Brexiters won the vote.

    Just.

     Perhaps the only way to resolve the issue, is to have another public vote now that we are all better informed.

    Indeed. It should be nul and void because the leave campaign was all based on lies, and even the No voters now realise that.

     It cannot be a consensus, so some people will still be left dissatisfied.

    Some, but no doubt not almost half those who voted! as is now the case.

  • Well, yes, and even more of interest, England per se was almost entirely in favor, while Scotland and North Ireland -- and I believe Wales as well -- were almost entirely against. Again, a populous group in one area (England proper) over-rode the opinions of the rest of the nation.

    That's nowhere near true.

    England voted for Brexit, by 53.4% to 46.6%.

    Wales also voted for Brexit, with Leave getting 52.5% of the vote and Remain 47.5%.

    What's remarkable is that Wales get's a large amount of EU grants, that they will now lose.

     Scotland and Northern Ireland both backed staying in the EU. Scotland backed Remain by 62% to 38%, while 55.8% in Northern Ireland voted Remain and 44.2% Leave.




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