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Cover PDF settings

obloquyobloquy Reader
edited August 26 in Print Books
Why does the knowledge base suggest creating cover PDFs in RGB in the one-piece cover designer KB doc, while the PDF Creation Settings doc says CMYK? I am trying to get my colors to print accurately while also having the Lulu book cover preview not look weird.

Comments

  • It's always been ambiguous, but, I do believe the techs when they say, if you start with one profile, stick to it, whichever, but never change mid-flow, that can, at times, cause problems with the final printing.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    I have no idea why they give such advice. It's more to do with preparing for print plates, and POD machines do not use them. They are either laserjets and deskjets that work off an image file, and mix the inks accordingly, in one pass. Just the same as a domestic printer.

    I create jpgs, with 'just' the setting of '16,000,000 colours (24 bit)'  My covers look exactly as they do as 'art' on my screen.

    The Cover Wizard converts the covers I create in to a Print Ready PDF. Simplez  :)

    Myself and my friend combined know everything there is to know, but he's not here.

  • I forgot to note that the downloadable cover templates are RGB as well—that's why I sometimes accidentally end up in RGB space when starting a new design. Thanks for the comments; Maybe I will try uploading a JPG and let the Cover Wizard do the PDF conversion next time.
  • I spoke with our print team today and got some clarity on this:

    Our printers convert to CMYK. 

    So our general recommendation is to use CMYK. I'll work on getting the instructions updated to reflect this.  
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    What software still requires settings for individual printing plates?

    Myself and my friend combined know everything there is to know, but he's not here.

  • The industry at large cannot guarantee perfect matches, sadly. While with many shades the difference is imperceptible and so either profile would do, with some shades there is a marked difference - both can still be called the same colour or shade of course, but nonetheless there's a difference between them. This is where folks who need a 100% accuracy in the reproduction of a certain shade can get caught out, usually by creating in RGB but for it to be printed in CMYK. It's never bothered me as my coloured stuff just needs to be in the ballpark; I suspect there's tons of us the same, but some folks do need a more faithful rendering so in these instances best to stick with CMYK.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    By spending time messing with the display on my monitor, the jpgs on it look exactly the same as on my printer, and thusly, on my POD printed covers. The printer's software sorts out what to spray, and when, and in what single-pass 'layers.'

    Myself and my friend combined know everything there is to know, but he's not here.

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