Shameless Promotion Oy Vey

SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

When promoting a book, it's usally a harbinger to 1) not include a link to the work, 2) not have a preview for the work in question, and 3) announce you took peoples' advice and inserted a line between paragraphs.

 

Writing a book people will want to read isn't as easy as sitting down, pounding a keyboard till you're satisfied, then waiting for royalties to start rolling in.

 

It's actual work.

 

I'm relatively obscure due to many factors, but the relative quality of my work isn't one of those factors. I'm a fiarly competent writer with at least a small amount of talent.

 

Ron Miller isn't an obscure writer, and I think he'd agree with the idea that if you put it out there and expect people to pay for it, then you need to treat your writing like a real job that requires some effort.

 

The bottom line is no matter what jobs we do in life the amount of effort we put into our work says something about each of us. Think about it while I go wipe my toddler's stinky rear-end.

Comments

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    To give the devil his due:

     

    If you search for the hardcover of that title, there is a preview, and he did take some of our advice, in that there are distinct paragraphs, separated somewhat by changes of idea. Also, it's 42 pp. instead of the usual 15-22. 

     

    I think that this author may have fulfilled his potential with this tale.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Mr Robison,

     

    You are a far more charitable man than I.

     

    I finally found the preview, and while slightly better than his prior efforts, I'd like to see the author in question prove you wrong about having reached his potential. My reasoning is simple.

     

    One of the biggest complaints some people have about self-published work is quality or more properly the lack thereof. Every example that supports that perspective makes it exponentially harder for the self-published writers who do strive for and attain some level of excellence with their work.

     

    In all venues, if mediocre quality is the best someone can do, they need to make it the best mediocre effort they possibly can. A mediocre medic can save lives. A mediocre cook can sustain lives. If that's the best someone can do, fine, but if it's not...

     

    I skimmed some of your work after looking at the other author's preview, and I can honestly say you don't need to worry about being a mediocre writer.

     

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    Well, thank you; I appreciate the compliments.

     

    I'm fairly confident that the author in question doesn't read in the workshop, so I'll be blunt: I suspect that his potential may not be very high. Yes, everyone can learn, and yes, we must encourage everyone who can learn. But there's a saying about pouring a bucket of water into a shotglass.

     

    Frankly, this is the first time I've seen that he's taken anyone's advice at all, so it is a (small, even miniscule) step forward. I would love to be proven wrong. I'd love to see that author write a story worthy of being called a story. But if you or I had so much detailed advice given to us so pointedly, our next work would be a major improvement. That the same is not true of the author in question causes me to suspect that the ceiling has been reached.

     

    And at the risk of forming a mutual adoration society, your writing is not mediocre either.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    After the two years just passed, being described as charitable is a mixed compliment when coming from me. Then again, something too darkly vile to be suffered strained my sense of mercy, so perhaps I just need some time.

     

    That said, have you ever observed an individual capable of performing at a higher level who refuses to do so until circumstances bites him/her/zir on the rear? I have. Sometimes people keep doing what they're comfortable with simply because the right situation hasn't occurred and gotten their attention.

     

    My father used to allude to buckets with more holes than a sieve being hard to fill.

     

    Recognizing the competence of another is far from mutual admiration, more a form of pragmatic honesty that many don't ascribe to these days. After a lifetime of study it's safe to say if I had a better grasp of the human condition my work would be much better, but we all have to work within our limitations.

     

    The good news is my replacements are smarter than I ever could be.


    Skoob_Ym wrote:

    Well, thank you; I appreciate the compliments.

     

    I'm fairly confident that the author in question doesn't read in the workshop, so I'll be blunt: I suspect that his potential may not be very high. Yes, everyone can learn, and yes, we must encourage everyone who can learn. But there's a saying about pouring a bucket of water into a shotglass.

     

    Frankly, this is the first time I've seen that he's taken anyone's advice at all, so it is a (small, even miniscule) step forward. I would love to be proven wrong. I'd love to see that author write a story worthy of being called a story. But if you or I had so much detailed advice given to us so pointedly, our next work would be a major improvement. That the same is not true of the author in question causes me to suspect that the ceiling has been reached.

     

    And at the risk of forming a mutual adoration society, your writing is not mediocre either.


     


  • Skoob_Ym wrote:

    To give the devil his due:

     

    If you search for the hardcover of that title, there is a preview, and he did take some of our advice, in that there are distinct paragraphs, separated somewhat by changes of idea. Also, it's 42 pp. instead of the usual 15-22. 

     

    I think that this author may have fulfilled his potential with this tale.


    I'm afraid that I have to agree with you.

     

    I was at first encouraged when I read that he was taking some of the advice given to him...but then dismayed when I realized that whatever that advice was, it apparently came from none of us. Who in the world would have told him to use spacing between paragraphs instead of indents?

     

    The writing and storytelling itself doesn't appear to have improved one iota. 

     

    But I am not sure how many people will get even as far as his preview given that the Shameless Promotion announcement has itself so many errors: there is not a properlly capitalized word in it. This does not give a very good impression.

     

    I do have to give him full marks, however, for what really has to be the most unusual book cover I have seen in quite a while.

  • Ron

     

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with using spacing between paragraphs for an ebook.

    Plenty of white space is easier on the eye and you will find that a large number of ebooks

    using spacing instead of indents.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Sadly, he's doing it in print format.

     

    When I see a line between paragraphs without indents in print, I think technical or textbook format.


    danielblue wrote:

    Ron

     

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with using spacing between paragraphs for an ebook.

    Plenty of white space is easier on the eye and you will find that a large number of ebooks

    using spacing instead of indents.


     

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    If nothing else the cover (is it the weenie character?) will get your attention.


    Ron Miller wrote:

    Skoob_Ym wrote:

    To give the devil his due:

     

    If you search for the hardcover of that title, there is a preview, and he did take some of our advice, in that there are distinct paragraphs, separated somewhat by changes of idea. Also, it's 42 pp. instead of the usual 15-22. 

     

    I think that this author may have fulfilled his potential with this tale.


    I'm afraid that I have to agree with you.

     

    I was at first encouraged when I read that he was taking some of the advice given to him...but then dismayed when I realized that whatever that advice was, it apparently came from none of us. Who in the world would have told him to use spacing between paragraphs instead of indents?

     

    The writing and storytelling itself doesn't appear to have improved one iota. 

     

    But I am not sure how many people will get even as far as his preview given that the Shameless Promotion announcement has itself so many errors: there is not a properlly capitalized word in it. This does not give a very good imression.

     

    I do have to give him full marks, however, for what really has to be the most unusual book cover I have seen in quite a while.


     

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    I had the same thought about the book cover.

     

    If that is not a pure accident, then I have to think that Mr. Cameron may be correct regarding his potential: Even a crude joke requires a certain amount of wit. On the other hand, he might have googled "weiner dog" and gotten that as a search result.

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