How much can you quote legally?

If I use a quote from a magazine or book to prove a point can I do it legally? I have permission for much of my research from two sources but some quotes may be difficult to get the permission. I'm talking about one paragraph.

Comments

  • If the material is from a copyrighted source, you need to get permission.

     

    The US Copyright Office says that "Under the fair use doctrine of the U.S. copyright statute, it is permissible to use limited portions of a work including quotes, for purposes such as commentary, criticism, news reporting, and scholarly reports. There are no legal rules permitting the use of a specific number of words, a certain number of musical notes, or percentage of a work. Whether a particular use qualifies as fair use depends on all the circumstances. " But the USCO also emphasizes that it is always best to get permission. This is probably going to be the case with your  book since your quotes sound like they are going to be extensive (entire paragraphs as opposed to a few words or a sentence.) Also note that fair usage is limited to "commentary, criticism, news reporting, and scholarly reports." The link above goes into much more detail about the limitations to fair usage.

     

    So, in short, I think you would be safest in pursuing permission. 

  • JN, it's probably fair use, but just to be safe you can paraphrase. Example, In his book _____, _____ explains how ......

     

    i'd be happy to give you a hand if you need some objectivity.

     

     

  • A paragraph is OK provided you use quotation marks, and you mention the source either in round brackets or in a note. There are scholastic agencies in charge of calculating the number of times an author is quoted. The greater the number, the more famous you are in the circle concerned. This applies also to journal articles.

    P.S. As I already said a couple of years ago, a scholarly book without quotations and without a bibliography would be regarded with suspicion, and people would start searching for instances of plagiarism - and it's often the case.


  • Em_Press wrote:

    JN, it's probably fair use, but just to be safe you can paraphrase. Example, In his book _____, _____ explains how ......

     

    i'd be happy to give you a hand if you need some objectivity.

     

     


    Paraphrasing would be a very good solution.

     

    "Probably fair use" is too iffy to play with, especially when the law tends to favor the copyright owner.

     

    R

  • I agree, but I would bet my house that he will never get sued for one paragraph. Ever.

     

     

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Best to get pertmission or paraphrase. I've seen people get sued over a mutt.

  • There are some quotes using quotation marks and ending with source including publication, dates, and page numbers. I think paraphrasing might be the best answer. The others I have permission for. Thanks for your advice and help!

  • Even if you paraphrase you need to correctly cite your sources.

    Not to do so would be plagiarism. While it is true that with the sheer

    volume of material being published these days chances are slim that all copyright

    infringements will be followed up, one doesn't want to be the exception

    to the rule. Goodness knows, we don't earn enough out of what we do

    to be shelling out for legal fees.


  • Brambles wrote:

    Even if you paraphrase you need to correctly cite your sources.

    Not to do so would be plagiarism. While it is true that with the sheer

    volume of material being published these days chances are slim that all copyright

    infringements will be followed up, one doesn't want to be the exception

    to the rule. Goodness knows, we don't earn enough out of what we do

    to be shelling out for legal fees.


    Indeed. I have mentioned before that I had once been on the godly side of a copyright suit. I can guarantee that you never want to be on the other side. 

     

    Keep in mind that copyright suits are heard in a federal court, which adds more than a little seriousness to the situation.

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    Fortunately, Mushashi-san is unlikely to take exception to your citations.

     

    It was a badly-documented quotation that caused his disagreement with Kojiro, after all...

     

    I think the others have all given good advice. Get permission where possible, paraphrase carefully where impossible, and be diligent in all citations.

  • The idea you gave me is in the works. Finally figured out what to do with it. I'll have to go back and redo some paraphrasing then on the other book. Not too much. Most will be hard to contact.

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