Are You A Shameless Hussy?

Are you a driveby forumite? Do you post but never read?

Know that you are on a hiding to nothing!

 

Aint nobody going to care if you offer 75 % discount if

no one knows where to find your books.

 

This really is pathetically sad.

 

Comments

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Betimes the world is better off when some books can't be found.


    danielblue wrote:

    Are you a driveby forumite? Do you post but never read?

    Know that you are on a hiding to nothing!

     

    Aint nobody going to care if you offer 75 % discount if

    no one knows where to find your books.

     

    This really is pathetically sad.

     


     

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    But it is the nature of the shameless that they cannot be shamed.

     

    And I'm tempted to offer a 110% discount on those same books, if the reader completes the entire thing. Curiosity, you know. But I won't.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Through the years I've observed a few interesting things when it comes to people. While it's true enough that some people can't be shamed it goes a bit beyond that.

     

    One segment of the population will be helpful, as in they want to see others succeed or do the best they can in a particular field.

     

    One segment of the population will be anything but helpful, as in they want to see others fail because they think it makes them look better in their field, even if they're mediocre at best.

     

    One segment of the population actively seeks out advice on how to learn and improve their skills in a field. They want to succeed and aren't afraid to do the work it takes to go as far as they can.

     

    One segment of the population actively asks for applause while avoiding any and all advice on how to make their work better, because they don't care to actually make the effort needed to learn and improve. They either don't care how bad their work is, or they are somehow convinced it's perfect and can't get any better, or some combination of the two.

     

    The fora regulars who offer their help and advice honestly want to see those new to self-publishing do as well as they possibly can.

     

    But humans as a species tend to be contrary, or as my father used to say: "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it backstroke." My take is simple. You can't help people who are convinced they don't need help.


  • SphinxCameron wrote:

    Through the years I've observed a few interesting things when it comes to people. While it's true enough that some people can't be shamed it goes a bit beyond that.

     

    One segment of the population will be helpful, as in they want to see others succeed or do the best they can in a particular field.

     

    One segment of the population will be anything but helpful, as in they want to see others fail because they think it makes them look better in their field, even if they're mediocre at best.

     

    One segment of the population actively seeks out advice on how to learn and improve their skills in a field. They want to succeed and aren't afraid to do the work it takes to go as far as they can.

     

    One segment of the population actively asks for applause while avoiding any and all advice on how to make their work better, because they don't care to actually make the effort needed to learn and improve. They either don't care how bad their work is, or they are somehow convinced it's perfect and can't get any better, or some combination of the two.

     

    The fora regulars who offer their help and advice honestly want to see those new to self-publishing do as well as they possibly can.

     

    But humans as a species tend to be contrary, or as my father used to say: "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it backstroke." My take is simple. You can't help people who are convinced they don't need help.


    Or as Dorothy Parker said, "You can lead a whore to culture but you can't make her think."

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Very true as well.


    Ron Miller wrote:

    SphinxCameron wrote:

    Through the years I've observed a few interesting things when it comes to people. While it's true enough that some people can't be shamed it goes a bit beyond that.

     

    One segment of the population will be helpful, as in they want to see others succeed or do the best they can in a particular field.

     

    One segment of the population will be anything but helpful, as in they want to see others fail because they think it makes them look better in their field, even if they're mediocre at best.

     

    One segment of the population actively seeks out advice on how to learn and improve their skills in a field. They want to succeed and aren't afraid to do the work it takes to go as far as they can.

     

    One segment of the population actively asks for applause while avoiding any and all advice on how to make their work better, because they don't care to actually make the effort needed to learn and improve. They either don't care how bad their work is, or they are somehow convinced it's perfect and can't get any better, or some combination of the two.

     

    The fora regulars who offer their help and advice honestly want to see those new to self-publishing do as well as they possibly can.

     

    But humans as a species tend to be contrary, or as my father used to say: "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it backstroke." My take is simple. You can't help people who are convinced they don't need help.


    Or as Dorothy Parker said, "You can lead a whore to culture but you can't make her think."


     

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    SphinxCameron wrote:

    Through the years I've observed a few interesting things when it comes to people. While it's true enough that some people can't be shamed it goes a bit beyond that.

     

    One segment of the population will be helpful, as in they want to see others succeed or do the best they can in a particular field.

     

    One segment of the population will be anything but helpful, as in they want to see others fail because they think it makes them look better in their field, even if they're mediocre at best.

     

    One segment of the population actively seeks out advice on how to learn and improve their skills in a field. They want to succeed and aren't afraid to do the work it takes to go as far as they can.

     

    One segment of the population actively asks for applause while avoiding any and all advice on how to make their work better, because they don't care to actually make the effort needed to learn and improve. They either don't care how bad their work is, or they are somehow convinced it's perfect and can't get any better, or some combination of the two.

     

    The fora regulars who offer their help and advice honestly want to see those new to self-publishing do as well as they possibly can.

     

    But humans as a species tend to be contrary, or as my father used to say: "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it backstroke." My take is simple. You can't help people who are convinced they don't need help.


    Bordering on profound. It is often said that one cannot help an addict until he or she comes to the realization of the addiction, and the helplessness of their state. This may be true of writing as well... Perhaps a twelve-step writing program is what we need.

     

    Your four segments could be organized in a grid... One would always hope to be of the "Helpful, Improving" type.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    I don't know how profound it is as it's just simple behavioral psychology I've observed through the decades. When you understand what motivates individuals you can get a better grasp on why they do what they do.

     

    Consider the addict, whether the addiction is a drug or an activity, it's about stimulating the pleasure center of the brain. The underlying reasons for the addictive behavior may be quite different though the end result is quite similar.

     

    Writers and other artists may in a sense be considered addicts though often in a more positive setting. Gaining a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction after creating a work of art usually isn't going to be self-destructive and often enough serves a beneficial societal purpose.

     

    I could ramble on but I'm not the brightest bulb in the socket just as I'm also not a licensed psychologist. I'm just a decent enough observer of the human condition so time for me to fall silent.


    Skoob_Ym wrote:

    SphinxCameron wrote:

    Through the years I've observed a few interesting things when it comes to people. While it's true enough that some people can't be shamed it goes a bit beyond that.

     

    One segment of the population will be helpful, as in they want to see others succeed or do the best they can in a particular field.

     

    One segment of the population will be anything but helpful, as in they want to see others fail because they think it makes them look better in their field, even if they're mediocre at best.

     

    One segment of the population actively seeks out advice on how to learn and improve their skills in a field. They want to succeed and aren't afraid to do the work it takes to go as far as they can.

     

    One segment of the population actively asks for applause while avoiding any and all advice on how to make their work better, because they don't care to actually make the effort needed to learn and improve. They either don't care how bad their work is, or they are somehow convinced it's perfect and can't get any better, or some combination of the two.

     

    The fora regulars who offer their help and advice honestly want to see those new to self-publishing do as well as they possibly can.

     

    But humans as a species tend to be contrary, or as my father used to say: "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it backstroke." My take is simple. You can't help people who are convinced they don't need help.


    Bordering on profound. It is often said that one cannot help an addict until he or she comes to the realization of the addiction, and the helplessness of their state. This may be true of writing as well... Perhaps a twelve-step writing program is what we need.

     

    Your four segments could be organized in a grid... One would always hope to be of the "Helpful, Improving" type.


     

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