Original Idea

          How and when does one’s peers recognize a fellow writer with respect and curtesy and except one's writing style as the same as or equal to the same style as they would expect of one of their own?  

          After seven titles written exclusively by me and edited by another with prior experiance in the field, my work and style of writing is still criticized as being illegitimate by most people in this forum. Is it just me, or do I recognize a pattern of illegitimacy and deceit amongst my colleagues?

         It all seemed to start as a fledgling writer who had a hard time spelling, didn’t quite understand how conversations between characters were supposed to be carried out, and how to figure out who one idea might flow more smoothly with another.

         I learned most of this from Lomas. But, you guys haven’t been easy on me and I’m beginning to wonder where to draw the line in the sand. I mean when does a fledgling become all grown up? Or, does it mean that leaving the nest is more like being pushed out of the tree and onto into the fall leaves for predators to devour?

         I would like to have what others may call friends. I’m sure you can come up with some reason why I’m not worthy of your respect but after seven titles of what you consider to be garbage I still believe that my writing style has evolved into something legible. Tangible even. You can put your hands on my work and read what I’ve written in a manner in which could be considered gratifying for both me and the reader.

        I guess all I’m looking for is not to be the ugly duckling of the writing community. Sometimes I feel as though the stigma of having a mental illness should come as a breakthrough for other people who have a mental illness or a handicap of any sort and recognize my ambition, and drive as something to strive for. Instead, people become more and more stigmatized after watching what I have to go through.

          Jean Pierre Houdin was my friend until I had a singular thought of my own. Whereas I was ostracized for what he said was stealing his work. He has no wright to who and what the construction of The Great Pyramid could or could not be. Does he think that he is the first to consider how the structures were accomplished? NO!  Not even close. So who is he to tell me what I can and can’t write. It’s his prerogative to withdraw from our friendship but not based on the fact that as a colleague I came up with an original Idea?

Comments

  • Here's another good one fore you...

     

    "I did it for the fun of it"

    or,

    "Writing is just a hobby of mine!"

     

    We all know that money and notoriety is what we're all after. Welcome to the big time. krb.crb

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Were I after money and notoriety it wouldn't be through writing.

  • Then what? Maybe you intend to become a gigolo?

  • That was twenty years ago.

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭

    Bolter1224 wrote:

              How and when does one’s peers recognize a fellow writer with respect and curtesy and except one's writing style as the same as or equal to the same style as they would expect of one of their own?  

              After seven titles written exclusively by me and edited by another with prior experiance in the field, my work and style of writing is still criticized as being illegitimate by most people in this forum. Is it just me, or do I recognize a pattern of illegitimacy and deceit amongst my colleagues?

             It all seemed to start as a fledgling writer who had a hard time spelling, didn’t quite understand how conversations between characters were supposed to be carried out, and how to figure out who one idea might flow more smoothly with another.

             I learned most of this from Lomas. But, you guys haven’t been easy on me and I’m beginning to wonder where to draw the line in the sand. I mean when does a fledgling become all grown up? Or, does it mean that leaving the nest is more like being pushed out of the tree and onto into the fall leaves for predators to devour?

             I would like to have what others may call friends. I’m sure you can come up with some reason why I’m not worthy of your respect but after seven titles of what you consider to be garbage I still believe that my writing style has evolved into something legible. Tangible even. You can put your hands on my work and read what I’ve written in a manner in which could be considered gratifying for both me and the reader.

            I guess all I’m looking for is not to be the ugly duckling of the writing community. Sometimes I feel as though the stigma of having a mental illness should come as a breakthrough for other people who have a mental illness or a handicap of any sort and recognize my ambition, and drive as something to strive for. Instead, people become more and more stigmatized after watching what I have to go through.

              Jean Pierre Houdin was my friend until I had a singular thought of my own. Whereas I was ostracized for what he said was stealing his work. He has no wright to who and what the construction of The Great Pyramid could or could not be. Does he think that he is the first to consider how the structures were accomplished? NO!  Not even close. So who is he to tell me what I can and can’t write. It’s his prerogative to withdraw from our friendship but not based on the fact that as a colleague I came up with an original Idea?


    Kurt, if I may...

     

    I think you are as much a part of this community as anyone else. I certainly came here after you, so from the standpoint of seniority, you've got a better claim to participation than I do. I don't know if we're friends... We're certainly not enemies. I would say that you are worthy of respect and of courtesy, most definitely. If we were to meet in person, I would be willing to shake your hand.

     

    Having said that, let me clarify: Sometimes the most respectful thing we can do is to tell someone that he is wrong. An enemy won't take the time to tell us when we make mistakes: An enemy won't care. To me, if someone takes the time to tell me that I made a mistake, or that my work is flawed, I see that as a gesture of respect and courtesy. Please, if you see something wrong with my writing, please feel free to tell me.

     

    I agree with you that you've clearly come far. I don't know what kind of mental illness you have or may have had, but for anyone, even a high-functioning individual without mental illnesses, to complete a book -- that is a worthy milestone, and something to be celebrated. The fact that you have books in print is a great thing. It is a sign of being "grown up." You should be proud.

     

    The question is whether you might be able to have better books in print. That's something that only you can say. If some folks here urge you to make better books, that is, in my opinion, a gesture of respect. These same folks have held me accountable for my works. Some of the forum members asked me tough questions about my first book, and especially the cover that I chose. After several years of having that book in print, I've decided to retire it so that I can decide whether to re-write it and re-issue it later.

     

    I see the tough questions as courtesy and respect. I think it's important to ask yourself if others are pointing out problems in order to ridicule you, or as a first step in fixing the problem. I never hear people here saying, "Look at that guy, his books are stupid" -- That would be ridicule, obviously -- but rather, "Hey, why don't you make this more professional?"

     

    Of course, communication has two parts: The speaking and the hearing. Sometimes those don't match. What people mean as help might sound like hate. But I don't think it is; not here.

     

    I hope that helps, Kurt.

  • It absolutely helps. 100%. Thank you. I feel that my books are where they need to e as is! But to still rercieve constructive critisimn. The books are finished my way. Like it or not. I get enough reviews from my readers who's words I have much more respect for. I come here to this forum not looking for attention like shock-jock or something but because I'm looking for refuge. A safe harbor. Somewhere where you don't need to like my book but have enough respect not to knock it.

     

    As a curtisy I would offer my own advice. Right or wrong I can share my experiances with other authors because I feel I've become a wealth of knowledge and to help other poeple with questions, comments, or situations they are going through is something that I may've gone through myself would be rewarding to me as a person. I've learned everything myself as far as word processor softeware and also PDF creation and modification. So Thank you. Smiley Happykrb.crb


  • Skoob_Ym wrote:

    Bolter1224 wrote:

              How and when does one’s peers recognize a fellow writer with respect and curtesy and except one's writing style as the same as or equal to the same style as they would expect of one of their own?  

              After seven titles written exclusively by me and edited by another with prior experiance in the field, my work and style of writing is still criticized as being illegitimate by most people in this forum. Is it just me, or do I recognize a pattern of illegitimacy and deceit amongst my colleagues?

             It all seemed to start as a fledgling writer who had a hard time spelling, didn’t quite understand how conversations between characters were supposed to be carried out, and how to figure out who one idea might flow more smoothly with another.

             I learned most of this from Lomas. But, you guys haven’t been easy on me and I’m beginning to wonder where to draw the line in the sand. I mean when does a fledgling become all grown up? Or, does it mean that leaving the nest is more like being pushed out of the tree and onto into the fall leaves for predators to devour?

             I would like to have what others may call friends. I’m sure you can come up with some reason why I’m not worthy of your respect but after seven titles of what you consider to be garbage I still believe that my writing style has evolved into something legible. Tangible even. You can put your hands on my work and read what I’ve written in a manner in which could be considered gratifying for both me and the reader.

            I guess all I’m looking for is not to be the ugly duckling of the writing community. Sometimes I feel as though the stigma of having a mental illness should come as a breakthrough for other people who have a mental illness or a handicap of any sort and recognize my ambition, and drive as something to strive for. Instead, people become more and more stigmatized after watching what I have to go through.

              Jean Pierre Houdin was my friend until I had a singular thought of my own. Whereas I was ostracized for what he said was stealing his work. He has no wright to who and what the construction of The Great Pyramid could or could not be. Does he think that he is the first to consider how the structures were accomplished? NO!  Not even close. So who is he to tell me what I can and can’t write. It’s his prerogative to withdraw from our friendship but not based on the fact that as a colleague I came up with an original Idea?


    Dear Kurt,

    It would be hard to improve on what Skoob_Ym said. Since he did such a great job, I will comment on just a couple of things.

     

    You wrote, "How and when does one’s peers recognize a fellow writer with respect and curtesy and except one's writing style as the same as or equal to the same style as they would expect of one of their own?" The answer is that it is not style that people are hoping for you to emulate but quality. Everyone has their own style of writing, just as every artist or craftsman has their own style of working. But whatever your style may be, attention to quality is always important. This means being careful about sentence structure, formatting, spelling, punctuation, etc. These things are largely independent of style.  

     

    You wrote, "I mean when does a fledgling become all grown up?" The short answer is that no author stops learning. At least any author really worth their salt. There are always things to learn and ways in which one's work can be improved.

     

    You wrote, "I’m sure you can come up with some reason why I’m not worthy of your respect but after seven titles of what you consider to be garbage I still believe that my writing style has evolved into something legible." The fact is that your work has improved greatly! In fact, many of us here have said so. But, as I said above, there is always room for improvement no matter who you are. 

     

    On a side note, I don't think any of us here---at least not among the regulars---has ever called your work "garbage." It's not. In fact, in one of my last posts to you I praised the story we were talking about. I think the thing to do is not consider every criticism as being a personal attack: they are not. By the same token, perhaps we could find a little more in your work to praise and let you know what that is.

     

    The thing is that weathering criticism comes part and parcel with being an author. I've been writing and publishing for almost 50 years and in that time have had to endure some pretty brutal comments on my work, both from professional reviewers and from readers. You just cannot take that sort of thing personally. If the writer brings up a valid point, file it away for future reference---but otherwise, getting angry is a waste of time. (Happily, most of the reviews for my books have been good, I am pleased to say! But that doesn't mean that every word I write is letter-perfect, either. You should see one of my MS when it comes back from an editor or copy editor! What I thought was a perfectly clean book has every page filled with corrections and suggestions. This is always a little disheartening...but then I remember that all the editors are trying to do is help make my book the best it can be. The same goal I have.) 

     

    You wrote, " I guess all I’m looking for is not to be the ugly duckling of the writing community." You are not! If people seem to be dissecting your work more than that of other writers, it may well be because they see a lot of potential and talent---in other words, it is worth the time and effort to help you.

     

  • I got the, "help people" thing down pat Ron, and I appreciate what you are trying to do for me. My point is: I have no intention of writing anymore books and the ones I have are finished to my likings.Take it or leave it. I'm not going to change a thing even if my customers want me to. These are my books and they will be done my way. I'm not going to let a bunch of false accusations and feeble minded criticisms stop me from publishing a book the way I want it. Like what happened to skoob. I don't have the pocket book that you have and neither do many of us here. If so we would be using an actual publishing house which costs up to six grand a title. And that's just for one book! I've accomplished seven. So can't we all just get along???

     

    I'm not going to sit here and listen to your critiques about my craftsmanship anymore. Those days are over Ron, and I do appreciate what you're trying to accomplished but what it really boils down to is whether or not I'm happy with the work and content to have others read it. That's not up to other authors in this forum and whether I charge for my work or not is really none of your bee's wax. As far as helping others? That too should be left between them and I without outside negative interference gumming up the works. Fifty years and all the kings men doesn't necessarily put Humpty ahead of everyone again. Let the new crew through.

     

    .Good day to you this morning. By the way! Who and where ever you are...


  • Bolter1224 wrote:

    I got the, "help people" thing down pat Ron, and I appreciate what you are trying to do for me. My point is: I have no intention of writing anymore books and the ones I have are finished to my likings.Take it or leave it. I'm not going to change a thing even if my customers want me to. These are my books and they will be done my way. I'm not going to let a bunch of false accusations and feeble minded criticisms stop me from publishing a book the way I want it. Like what happened to skoob. I don't have the pocket book that you have and neither do many of us here. If so we would be using an actual publishing house which costs up to six grand a title. And that's just for one book! I've accomplished seven. So can't we all just get along???

     

    Well, that would be nice but so long as you refer to people as making "false accusations" against you (whenever did that happen?) and say that honestly given advice is "feeble minded," I'm not so sure that is going to be possible. You take every word written about you and your work---no matter how well-meant---and turn it into an attack.

     

    By the way, as I've mentioned many times before, no traditional commercial publisher ever charges an author to publish their books. What you are talking about are vanity presses, which should be avoided at all costs.

     

     

    I'm not going to sit here and listen to your critiques about my craftsmanship anymore. Those days are over Ron, and I do appreciate what you're trying to accomplished but what it really boils down to is whether or not I'm happy with the work and content to have others read it.

     

    That's fair enough.

     

    That's not up to other authors in this forum and whether I charge for my work or not is really none of your bee's wax.

     

    I have never cared one way or the other. And no one is stopping you or even trying to stop you from selling your books. All I have ever said is that if you want people to pay the same amount of money for one of your book as they would for one from a commercial publisher, you have a responsibility to keep the quality as high as possible. In any case, not one single soul is suggesting that you shouldn't be selling your books, only that you are not the only one who needs to be pleased if you do sell any. Your customer needs to get full value for their money, too.

     

    If you decide that you don't to take any suggestions about your writing, if you are completely happy with your books, then so be it. No one is suggesting that you shouldn't, we are just trying to encourage you work a little harder and be open to criticism and advice. You are free to ignore things like that, of course, but don't lash out at people for trying.

     

    I have said elsewhere that you have made tremendous strides in your writing---it's obvious you are working hard and it shows---and I have also said that you seem to have some pretty good stories to tell. All of this is to your credit!

     

    I know that you seem to be a little rankled when I bring up my experience, but I was only trying to show you that even the most experienced authors have to bite the bullet when it comes to criticism or editing. But anything that helps make my books better is something I encourage. This is mainly because no author can be wholly objective about their own work. As I said earlier, I've had entire manuscripts that I thought were letter-perfect arrive back here with scores and even hundreds of suggested fixes or changes. If I had said, "Well, this book is absolutely perfect the way it is, let's go to press," I certainly would have eventually been embarrassed by the final product. 

     

     


     

  • Embarrassed?

     

    Because of something someone else told you? That's like shooting yourself in the foot as far as I'm concerned. I feel like that's the problem if anyone would listen. I really am way past the rejection aproclomation that continues on in forums across the web. Where on Earth did you find a publisher for free? An editor, or a custom cover creator? Because I know that I've paid extensively for the work that others have performed on my novels.

     

    It was me complaining about their work. Not the other way around! If I'm going to pay for something I had better be satisfied with the results myself. Especially considering the rate at which people charge. Just go to bibliocrunch.com and test out the waters because that's an indie author's best bet! Thanks again for your input Ron. I do enjoy our little debates. krb.crb

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭

    Kurt, to clarify:

     

    My decision to retire Flashing in the Eye of the Impeller was not because someone made me do it.

     

    I chose to retire that book because, when I looked at it with an objective eye, I saw that the comments others had made were valid: The cover did look more like a textbook than a novel, the use of multiple fonts in the front matter was jarring and confusing, and the plot had some issues. I'm still proud of it, because it was my first novel, and my first fiction book in print.

     

    But as I look at it now, having developed as a writer and as a cover designer (but still with a long way to go in both areas) I truly believe that if I were to do that project now, I could make a better book -- a more cohesive plot; a more focused cover, and a simpler combination of typefaces. I believe that I can do a better job.

     

    The key difference is this: I didn't feel that my work was less worthy. I feel that I can do better. It is not from a place of persecution and oppression, but from a place of confidence and empowerment.

     

    I CAN do better. And that's the key.

     

    Hope that helps.


  • Bolter1224 wrote:

    Embarrassed?

     

    Because of something someone else told you? That's like shooting yourself in the foot as far as I'm concerned. I feel like that's the problem if anyone would listen.

     

    Let me explain the "embarrassed." If, say, I ignored everything my editors told me and a book came out riddle with errors of all kinds----bad spelling, terrible punctuation, terrible grammar, etc.---I would have every right to be embarrassed. And have no one to blame but myself.

     

    I really am way past the rejection aproclomation that continues on in forums across the web. Where on Earth did you find a publisher for free? An editor, or a custom cover creator? Because I know that I've paid extensively for the work that others have performed on my novels.

     

    Easy! Writer's Market lists literally thousands of different book publishers. Being professional traditional publishers they do not charge their authors anything. You can access this information online for a small fee, but most libraries will carry the latest print edition of the book.

     

    For instance, my most recent books have been published by Farrar, Stras & Giroux, Smithsonian Books andWatkins and Zenith. None of these publishers ever charge a penny. They absorb the entire expense of publishing a book. 

     

    Traditional publishers will either pay an advance to the author upfront or (often with smaller publishers) work on a royalty only basis. "Advance" means "advance against royalties." This means that the publisher keeps your royalties until they have paid themselves back---then you get more money. But you get to keep the advance no matter what, even if the book doesn't sell a single copy. In a royalty only contract you start earning money from the moment a book starts selling (paid quarterly usually). Of course, if the book sells badly you may wind up not getting much, so in the long run finding a publisher that pays advances is the best idea.

     

    The publisher also undertakes to cover the costs of editing the book, obtaining cover art and the expenses of marketing and advertising.

     


     

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭

    Here's an idea that occurred to me when I was thinking about how to evaluate our stories. This is not directed at anyone: I'm merely suggesting this as an easy-to-use measuring stick available to anyone.

     

    Suppose that you were asked to read a passage from one of your books in a public event -- maybe a book-signing. Could you select a pearl, maybe 7 to 10 pages, 12 at the outside, which you would be able to read and that would persuade people to buy the book? Or if you were to make a movie from the book, what scene would be the "Oscar Clip" that would be submitted to the academy awards?

     

    If we look at our work, and no one scene stands out as a favorite -- or no group of scenes that we would have trouble choosing between -- then perhaps we've written a mediocre book.

     

    I'm not saying that we should try to write one golden scene into each book, but simply, can we find a noteworthy high spot in each book, and if so, what?

  • The publisher also undertakes to cover the costs of editing the book, obtaining cover art and the expenses of marketing and advertising.

     

     

     

    Then why does LuLu exist if you can get everything for free?


  • Bolter1224 wrote:

    The publisher also undertakes to cover the costs of editing the book, obtaining cover art and the expenses of marketing and advertising.

     

     

     

    Then why does LuLu exist if you can get everything for free?


    A lot of reasons.

     

    1. The main one is that traditional publishers are extremely choosey about what they accept for publication. This is mainly because publishing a book properly is a very expensive proposition. You don't just walk into Random House and say, "I've got a book here I want you to publish." By the way, contrary to what I often hear in these forums, traditional publishers are always anxious to see work by brand-new authors---but that work has to stand out in some way. 

     

    2. Lulu essentiallly has no content restrictions. Anyone is free to publish pretty much anything they want, good, bad or indifferent. Lulu doesn't care. Lulu also doesn't care whether a book is properly edited or formatted, it doesn't care about spelling, punctuation or grammar. It doesn't care what your cover looks like. All of that is up to the author.

     

    3. Many people like the freedom or adventure of having control over every aspect of the publishing process. (This is often based on the erroneous fear that a tradtional publisher will take over their book and rewrite it. Nothing could be further from the truth.) But in order to compete against traditional publishing, an author needs to do at least as good a job with their book. And unless they have experience editing, copy-editing (and I don't think any author can objectively do either of those things themselves), designing, creating cover art, advertising and marketing, they have to pay professionals to undertake these tasks.

     

    4. Lulu is fun.

     

    5. There is the potential of making more money through Lulu, since you are free to set your "royalty" (the amount above the actual manufacturing cost) to anything you like. (But in order to actually exceed what you would earn from a traditional publisher requires a lot of skill, time and investment: this is because the author has to do as good a job as a traditional publisher and this includes everything from editing and design to advertising and marketing. Take review copies for instance. If you want to send hard copies of your book to reviewers, you have to pay for each book. A traditional publisher includes review copies in its budget.) Traditional publishers offset this to a degree by offering authors advances. That means you are guaranteed a certain amount of money no matter how well or badly your book might sell.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Traditional Publishers look for manuscripts that are a good fit for the type books they publish. If the writing is at a high enough level of quality and a good fit, the publish enters into a contract with the author. It can take anywhere from years to decades for an author to get a good publishing contract.

     

    Lulu is not a publisher in the sense of Traditional Publishing, more of an intermediary allowing Self Publishers access to print and distribution services.

     

    Vanity Publishers will charge an author for a variety of services to print a book that usually never sees the light of day.


    Bolter1224 wrote:

    The publisher also undertakes to cover the costs of editing the book, obtaining cover art and the expenses of marketing and advertising.

     

     

     

    Then why does LuLu exist if you can get everything for free?


     

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    It should also be noted there are a great many brand-new authors submitting manuscripts daily.

     

    The situation is similar to kids playing football in a sandlot dreaming of making it to the pros. There are tens of thousands of kids with the same dream. Most of those kids will never make it to playing football in college much less the pros because those teams are looking for the best players they can find.

     

    For each brand-new author who gets a publishing contract the first time out, there are many thousands who got rejection notices.


  • SphinxCameron wrote:

    Traditional Publishers look for manuscripts that are a good fit for the type books they publish. If the writing is at a high enough level of quality and a good fit, the publish enters into a contract with the author. It can take anywhere from years to decades for an author to get a good publishing contract.

     

    I have friends who have been shopping their books around forever! Once a book is accepted, however, it can appear in print within a year. The trick is to do your homework and find a publisher who is well-matched to your book. This is where something like Writer's Market is worth its weight in gold. For instance, it will keep you from submitting your erotic romance novel to a Christian children's book publisher. Another trick is to have more than one book making the rounds.

     

    An agent can help a great deal, too, but they can be as difficult to hook up with as a publisher. In fact, more so, since an agency can only take on a very limited number of authors. This means they have to be extraordinarily picky. And an agent, just like a publisher, may ask for revisions to a book before they accept it.


  • SphinxCameron wrote:

    It should also be noted there are a great many brand-new authors submitting manuscripts daily.

     

    The situation is similar to kids playing football in a sandlot dreaming of making it to the pros. There are tens of thousands of kids with the same dream. Most of those kids will never make it to playing football in college much less the pros because those teams are looking for the best players they can find.

     

    For each brand-new author who gets a publishing contract the first time out, there are many thousands who got rejection notices.


    All too true! But I do want to emphasize something. It's an old canard in these fora that publishers will only consider books from established authors, or that you need to know someone in order to get a publisher to look at your book. This is just not true. These things can help, of course, but they don't guarantee anything. I can get most editors to look at my proposals, but unless what I'm pitching is very, very, very good that's as far as it will get.

     

    The best thing is to do your homework, find out what the market it, what the publishers are looking for. That doesn't mean they want yet one more Harry Potter clone or zombie apocalypse (which is where too many aspiring authors go wrong)...what publishers want is the next great trend. Looking over their catalogs will tell you what they have already published: show them something new and original. One of the first things you will be asked is: are there already books on the shelves like this one? The answer should be "no."

  • I know this thread is getting a little long in the tooth but you make it should as you said, "Easy!". Sounds to me to be a real dog and pony show. So with your respect and adoration you visit this forum extensively. Which is your right. But, is there a motive other than simple enjoyment. Like perhaps to put a corner on the market.

     

    As I said, a few stars here, a few stars there and people flock to a title.Put it on the front page and shower it with adoration. So otherwise I assume that you use the publishing house of your choice of whom you may well know interesting prospects that may write similar as to what you are looking for. Sounds like your in an interesting position for a wickapedia author with nothing to loose and everything to gain. What exactly is your motive here?

  • I got it! recruiter.


  • Bolter1224 wrote:

    I know this thread is getting a little long in the tooth but you make it should as you said, "Easy!". Sounds to me to be a real dog and pony show. So with your respect and adoration you visit this forum extensively. Which is your right. But, is there a motive other than simple enjoyment. Like perhaps to put a corner on the market.

     

    As I said, a few stars here, a few stars there and people flock to a title.Put it on the front page and shower it with adoration. So otherwise I assume that you use the publishing house of your choice of whom you may well know interesting prospects that may write similar as to what you are looking for. Sounds like your in an interesting position for a wickapedia author with nothing to loose and everything to gain. What exactly is your motive here?


    Why is everything with you so confrontational? I have always treated you with courtesy and politeness, which is apparently a complete waste of time since you would apparently take a cheery "good morning" as an attack on your character.

     

    There is nothing remotely "easy" about getting a book published. When I said "easy" I meant that answering your question about traditional publishers and how they work is simple. But there is nothing either simple or easy about the process.

     

    You suggest that I use "a publishing house of my choice" as if I can go out and pick and choose among them. That is not how it works. You suggest that the only reason a publisher would take on one of my projects is that I write like other authors working with them. That, also, is not how it works. I only wish it was---I'd have a lot more books published. But the fact is that it takes a tremendous amount of time and effort to sell a book to a publisher and one of the first things they ask is "how is this book different from what we have already done?" not "how much is this book like others we have published?" And once a book is accepted there comes anything from six months to a year of work on it, bringing it up to snuff. That ain't easy, I assure you.

     

    In the last few posts I've made I've only tried to correct your misapprehensions about the publishing industry. Specifically, that NO traditional publisher---and there are literally thousands of them---asks a penny from their authors, ever. There are plenty of "publishers" who will charge an author to publish their book...but these are nothing more than vanity presses. There is a world of difference between the two. The rewards of having a book published by a traditional publisher can be great...advance payments, professional editing, professional advertising and marketing, etc...but it can also be a very difficult and time-consuming process---something else I tried to make clear.

     

    I think you would do much better listening to the content of the posts being made by Skoop_Ym, SphinxCameron and others, who are only trying to help you, rather than wasting your time ferreting out imaginary insults.

     

     

  • I think you would do much better listening to the content of the posts being made by Skoop_Ym, SphinxCameron and others, who are only trying to help you, rather than wasting your time ferreting out imaginary insults.

     

    Nothing imaginary. I said nothing of insults. I was curious as to your motives. Are you trying to prepare people for to be accepted by a , "dime a dozen" publishing house when all they want to do is have fun publishing a book that resembles a three legged rocking chair if they want to?

     

    I've heard nothing but complaints when it comes to my books all about hyphens here and comma's there. Poor sentence structure and misappropriation of the English language on a bumpy road. Can't you just step back from what apparently you are suffering post traumatic stress over rather than just kick back and try to followa perfectly normal, man made storyline.

     

    Not some computer generated paragraph pronouncer. Consider the source and try to become more of a mentor than a task master, because I sure can't figure out where on Gods Green Earth you come up with this stuff. If you give someone half a chance you may actually start to see a spark here and there.

     

    I wish you the best Ron. I really do. Our personalities clash because I'm liberal and your some form of perfectionist. Like you said, "We're just going to have to admit to one another that we agree to disagree, "on the wonderful World of story telling."

     

    No pun intended...krb.crb

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Ron,

     

    If a clinical psychologist exists within your circle of acquaintances, have him or her read over the thread.

     

    What you're dealing with is what happens when someone (regardless of mental defect / illness or lack thereof) dons the mantle of victim-identity, and there is nothing reasonable about it.

     

    It's all about perception, as in who is keeping the person (self-identifying as a victim) from having what they want or preventing them from achieving their goals.

     

    No matter how much you refer to reality and your experience, if someone has a fantasy that you had it easy then nothing you say will matter.

     

    Then again what would I know, Sphinx only pawn in game of life.

Sign In or Register to comment.