Software Glitch

SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

This morning I was rudely awakened by a scorpion that tried to claim territorial rights over my bed. Since I was a bit restive, I started formatting a novel for Epub.

 

Oddly enough, the software wanted to barf on the title with the message it didn't meet capitalization requirements.

 

Mono-Earth: The War of the Egg

 

Funny thing is, I checked the requirements and the "Title: Subtitle" are within the guidelines.

 

"Mono-Earth" is the title.

 

"The War of the Egg" is the subtitle.

 

A ":" followed by a space separates the two.

Comments

  • Hyphens are not allowed.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    Then it will be Kindle only.

     

    It didn't say a hyphenated word as title wasn't allowed, and a hyphen separating title and subtitle has to have a preceding and following space.


    danielblue wrote:

    Hyphens are not allowed.


     

  • The software is not very smart. When the human reviews the title for QA, they will pass it and send it along to iBookstore. The title bot also gets a little hung up on & and "

  • aka-Glenn said

     

    The software is not very smart. When the human reviews the title for QA, they will pass it and send it along to iBookstore. The title bot also gets a little hung up on & and "

     

    I don't know how that is possible as you will not get past the very first stage of creating an epub if the title is not in the desired format. In other words, there will be nothing for the human to review.

     

    The best thing to do, if you encounter an error message about capitalization, is to play around with a few examples until you can figure out just what is, and what isn't allowed. Books going into distribution have to meet the particular requirements of all the distribution partners.

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    I followed title capitalization rules well enough for the Copyright Office, and the print version is awaiting my receipt of the proof copy to approve distribution. I also know print requirements differ from soft-copy.

     

    I'll see if the human QC passes it along.


    danielblue wrote:

    aka-Glenn said

     

    The software is not very smart. When the human reviews the title for QA, they will pass it and send it along to iBookstore. The title bot also gets a little hung up on & and "

     

    I don't know how that is possible as you will not get past the very first stage of creating an epub if the title is not in the desired format. In other words, there will be nothing for the human to review.

     

    The best thing to do, if you encounter an error message about capitalization, is to play around with a few examples until you can figure out just what is, and what isn't allowed. Books going into distribution have to meet the particular requirements of all the distribution partners.


     

  • Actually, a warning message displays, but you can ignore it in the eBook builder. I have done so many times. 

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    I did ignore it, and am waiting to see if B&N and Kobo accept it.

     

    When I did the Kindle version over at Amazon, no warnings, it's already live, and soon to be trickling out around the world.


    aka_Glenn wrote:

    Actually, a warning message displays, but you can ignore it in the eBook builder. I have done so many times. 


     

  • The Lulu title bot only checks against rudimentary rules.

    Before it was implemented, the number one reason for ebook QA rejection was capitalization errors.

    But, for ever good intention, there is an equal, but opposite bad outcome. In this case, symbols and hyphenated words get tangled in the bot's net. Hence the need for a human.  

     

  • SphinxCameronSphinxCameron Southern Escarpment Hill Country ✭✭

    One day the bots will fry our motherboards.


    aka_Glenn wrote:

    The Lulu title bot only checks against rudimentary rules.

    Before it was implemented, the number one reason for ebook QA rejection was capitalization errors.

    But, for ever good intention, there is an equal, but opposite bad outcome. In this case, symbols and hyphenated words get tangled in the bot's net. Hence the need for a human.  

     


     

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