Who bought it?

Twice now I have had bulk orders of 20 units come through. Is there any way to tell where those orders originated from? I suspect it was a university bookstore, but would love to know for sure. Don't need to know details - just general location would be good enough?

Comments

  • Congratulations.
  • According to Lulu, two copies of L'onirothèque de Quentin Cumber, volume 1, a book in French, were bought on the 31st of December 2016, one in the UK, another one in the EU through Amazon. Apart from the fact that the date is striking, if they had been bought through Amazon France, I shouldn't be surprised. So I am pleasantly puzzled.

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/jean-paul-g-potet/loniroth%C3%A8que-de-quentin-cumber-volume-1/hardcover/product-22547042.html

     

  • I believe Amazon reports their sales on the last day of the month, in one lump number - so if you've sold 1 book every Monday throughout the month, it will show up as a sale of 4 on the last day of the month.  In this case of 20 though, they were sold directly through Lulu, which I have always seen report the actual day of sale rather than at the end of the month..

  • It would be fantastic if the reports gave a hint more detail. Even a State or Province would be a clue, though we do get to see country codes. I know the feeling -- seeing a sale and wondering who it was and how the found my book. I have one book that is also listed with another POD service, and I recently checked to see how that was selling -- to my surprise, over the last six months, six copies have sold.

     

    To make a long story short, I sympathize with your curiosity. On the other hand, I have to agree with Jean-Paul: Accept the fact that it happened, and be glad. Congratulations!

     

    BTW, if it is a university bookstore, then the dates of the sales should correlate somewhat to the academic year -- beginning of a term, perhaps? Also, if it is an educational establishment -- I assume that your book is scholarly -- then you might be able to check the course catalogs of appropriate institutions to see if there is a course for which your book is a good fit.

     

    Congratulations, again, on the bulk sales!

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    The bottom line is that as long as you are using a third party to sell

    your books you do not have a right to know who bought them. Think

    about it from the viewpoint of the buyer: how would you like Amazon,

    Google, Lulu etc giving your personal details to the author of a book

    you have bought. It simply is not on. Thank goodness data protection

    laws prevent it from happening.

  • It's actually not a scholarly book but a memoir that touches on the long term psychological effects of childhood sexual abuse.  I know it is used as an optional book for a Psychology class at the University of Northern Iowa, so I *think* that may be where the order came from, but I don't remember a bulk order like this coinciding with last semester (when it was first used)...

     

    and I am very glad that it happened.. regardless of where it came from.  i'm just curious is all .. was hoping one of the lulu reps would pop on and say "oh yeah, if you look here, you can see what state the order originated from"

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    how would you like Amazon,

    Google, Lulu etc giving your personal details to the author of a book

    you have bought. It simply is not on. Thank goodness data protection

    laws prevent it from happening.

     

    And yet they do. It's how the likes of Google and Facebook make most of their money, and in many instances, many many other places such as Amazon, make some from it also. Information is worth a lot of money. Usually they keep most details to themselves, or share them with subsidiaries or any other company they own.

     

    Currently WhatsApp is in German courts for sharing personal account details with Facebook when they promised not to.

     

    Data Protection only really applies to very personal details that could be harmful or costly to an individual to divulge (that's why it's hacked). And of course it does not apply at all to such bodies as MI5, FBI, CIA, etc etc etc. And in far too many incidences, newspapers.

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    Kevin

     

    At the heart of data protection legislation is the understanding that the person processing the information should not use it for anything other than the intended purpose and should not pass on the information without consent. You will probably find, re the corporations you quoted, that embedded within their reams and reams of terms and conditions that by using their product you have given that consent.

     

    When you sign up with an online bookstore you have to give your name, address and telephone number. This is so that your credit card transactions can be authorised. This is the intended purpose of the book store collecting this information from you, not passing it on to the author.

     

    My reply was based on authors wanting to know more about their sales. You will not be able to. All you get to know is which country the book was sold in and this is correct. You won't even get to know which State your book was sold in.

  • In that case, the date is unimportant. Thanks.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    At the heart of data protection legislation is the understanding that the person processing the information should not use it for anything other than the intended purpose and should not pass on the information without consent.

     

    Indeed it is, but there's now the internet with companies using the laws of wherever they are registered or where their servers are. Some ignore the laws of many countries they have a presence in via the internet. American companies are often in European courts for ignoring European laws. As I said in my previous reply about Facebook.

     

     

    You will probably find, re the corporations you quoted, that embedded within their reams and reams of terms and conditions that by using their product you have given that consent.

     

    The names I mentioned have to be forced to admit what they gather and how they use it, therefore it is not mentioned in their TACs. Unfortunately it often as to be hackers and/or journalists who discover what they gather and what they do with it. How about Android Smartphones? Pre-loaded with Google apps that do not ask if they can, but just warn you that they do collect many things, and you cannot stop it.

     

    I can give you an example of how stuff one assumes is private is shared around. On line telephone directories for example. I once looked on Yel for something, and as well as my phone number it also listed everything from off government Censuses. Such as address an names of other people who live at it. (For a payment Yel would divulge even more information).  They should not even have had my number because it is ex-directory. Therefore I did not ask them to list me therefore I did not see any clauses due to that.

     

    When you sign up with an online bookstore you have to give your name, address and telephone number. This is so that your credit card transactions can be authorised.

     

    They only need the card number, name on it, and expiry date. They need name and address in order to deliver the item.

     

    This is the intended purpose of the book store collecting this information from you, not passing it on to the author.

     

    I never said it was told to the author or publisher, I said that at times they share it and even sell it to other organisations. Not your credit card details obviously, but name, address, phone number, what you bought and what else you looked at. You would perhaps be surprised at what the simple type of tracker software I had on my website can collect.

     

    My reply was based on authors wanting to know more about their sales. You will not be able to. All you get to know is which country the book was sold in and this is correct. You won't even get to know which State your book was sold in.

     

    I am sure you have read my previous posts over the years that have said exactly the same thing. What I said in this thread is that does not mean the retailers do not collect as much information as they can, use it for their own use, and share it with other branches, and at times even sell it.

     

    The internet possibly even knows what colour socks you have on right now, if any   Smiley Happy

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