I need a children's publisher

Hi. I would like to publish my books but all the publishers it seems wants money from me/Is that real true etc??

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  • Colby2007 wrote:

    Hi. I would like to publish my books but all the publishers it seems wants money from me/Is that real true etc??


    No legitimate traditional publisher will charge an author to publish a book. In fact, the exact opposite is true: They not only pay you, they also pay for all the expenses of publishing the book, including editing, design, marketing, advertising, etc.

     

    I would suggest that you do one of two things. You could get hold of the current edition of Writer's Market. Most libraries will carry this. It lists all reputable publishers, provides information on what they are looking for and how to approach them. (There is even a special edition just for the writers of children's books.) All of the information they provide comes directly from the publishers themselves.

     

    http://www.writersmarket.com/

     

    Or you can go to a bookstore and browse though the children's section, taking note of those books you think are most like your own and who published them.  You will still need to do some research since every publisher has their own guidelines for submissions, which must be followed to the letter. You will also need to know whether a publisher accepts unsolicited (i.e., unagented) submissions or not.

  • There are a few ways to get a book published. Ron is right about traditional publishers, they do not charge and in fact pay you for publishing.  That said, they have to feel that you, and your book, are worth investing thousands of dollars in.  From my experience, few publishers accept new authors, and the few that do get huge amounts of stories to wade through so they have a lot of authors to pick from.  The competition is fierce.

     

    Most traditional publishers accept books from agents.  To get an agent you have to show you are worth the agent investing their time in.  Usually this means experience or luck.  Agents should also not charge you for their services, but work on what they make for you.

     

    For new authors and authors that want more freedom, the self publishing, or vanity publishers come in.  With them you may pay for many of the services you would receive from a traditional publisher.  You do pay for this service though. You may also perform many of the publishing activities yourself, cutting the publishing costs to fit your needs.  These publishers will normally take almost anything you write, it is up to you to ensure the quality of your story. I don't think any of the self publishers accept hate mongering or illegal stories.

     

     That is likely the main reason you are getting fees with your publishers.  I have to assume you are talking to self publishers or vanity publishers which do charge for their services. Be very careful, because not all self publishers are created equal, there are scammers out there.  Read up all you can on a publisher before going with them, you will be glad you did!

     

    As a side note. I was surprised at the time it takes for a book to get published.  I am on the fourth full length (80K+) novel since I started publishing the first one and it is not done yet! So if you have them do all the work, expect some waiting time.

  • Why don't you just self publish here on Lulu; it's completely free!

  • I didn't know enough to feel comfortable doing that.  For the first books I wanted to see the process to get a better idea and compare to what I needed to do.  I didn't know a solid editor at the time as well as not knowing a lot of the ins and outs that I am still working on.  Items such as proper layout for copyright and ISBN as well as what the cover should look like if professionally done.  Basically the whole process.  I admit I am also in fear of putting out a book I am embarrassed by, which is easy to do when you don't know any better.  So I bit the bullet, paid the price for the full package and I wait....

     

    and wait....

     

    and wait....

     

    Smiley Tongue

     

    Okay, to be fair, the first copy went to DAW for three months and made it through the first cut before being denied on the second.  After having a professional editor go through it I am surprised it even made it that far. I didn't put in this book until April 1 (Something seemed right about putting it in on April Fools Day) and it is 101K words so it's longer than normal I think.  I am probably anxious because it is my first.

  • BTW I am using the Lulu full service package.
  • Everything you say about traditional publishing is true except for your feeling that few are willing to take on new authors. 

     

    This is something that I know a lot of Luluers believe, but it really isn't so. (I got into a seemingly endless discussion about this a month or so ago, in fact.) To counter this idea, I have repeatedly over the years gone through the catalogs of more than a dozen commercial publishers, ranging from the giants, such as Scribner's, on down to smaller independents. What I found is that not only do new, first-time authors consistenly appear in each season's catalogs but in many cases represent significant percentages of all the new titles listed (in one case more than 30% of the new titles were by first-time authors).

     

    There are several good reasons why publishers are not averse to new authors. One is that they cannot exist by solely depending on the work of established writers. They are always hoping to find the next J.K. Rowling or Tom Clancy. Another reason is a perfectly sound financial one: new writers are simply less expensive to publish: they cannot demand the advances that a proven author can. And editor after editor has explained to me that a book's quality and originality are among the most important considerations. A brand-new idea will always attract more attention from an editor than the 10,000th urban vampire story. 

     

    I know that it seems that publishers appear to focus on celebrity books and books by best-selling names...but what many people don't realize is that this is what enables publishers to be able to afford to take chances on brand-new authors.

     

    Finally, it's not so much that publishers are reluctant to see new authors as the fact that a new author has a longer, tougher gauntlet to run. This can be daunting, I know.


  • Colby2007 a écrit :

    Hi. I would like to publish my books but all the publishers it seems wants money from me/Is that real true etc??


    How odd! You are in a Lulu forum, and you do not think of publishing with Lulu.  Smiley Happy


  • Ron Miller wrote:

    Colby2007 wrote:

    Hi. I would like to publish my books but all the publishers it seems wants money from me/Is that real true etc??


    No legitimate traditional publisher will charge an author to publish a book. In fact, the exact opposite is true: They not only pay you, they also pay for all the expenses of publishing the book, including editing, design, marketing, advertising, etc.


    How odd. You are on a Lulu forum yet you do not recommend publishing via Lulu Smiley Wink

  • I was told i need a 1000 dollars to publish it send it to stores etc.


  • Colby2007 a écrit :

    I was told i need a 1000 dollars to publish it send it to stores etc.


    All you have to pay for is a proof at cost price + VAT + postage, generally less than 20€ for 200 pages paperback 6x9.

  • The people who told you this are called vanity publishers. They will take your money but whether they then offer a service worth having vaires enormously. And if your book is unsaleable they will prefer to take your money than to tell you so. But they do offer a useful service for people who cannot get published any other way and are willing to pay to get their work out there.

     

    The mainstream publishers will never ask for money up front - if they love your work they may in exceptional circumstances even offer you cash to be allowed to publish it. But there are so few good publishers and so many authors that it is very hard to even get noticed, never mind having your work accepted. This is why vanity publishers can be so useful sometimes. And of course this is why so many of us come to Lulu - we can publish as easily as if we were being asked to pay, except - we don't need to pay. Brilliant! Come to Lulu!

     

    Lulu do offer extra pay-for services. For example if you want to print a thousand copies and distribuite them to book stores, Lulu will not pay for all that, you will still have to.

  • I have this problem too. I am looking for a publisher for my children's book. I have approached several big companies, one even gave false emails to editors ect.making it virtually impossible to reach them personally. It's claimed you need an agent, as many book publishers don't accept books/scripts without one. I came up with a great idea for a children's book, as I was reluctant to use a smaller publisher.I feared many of my ideas may be stolen and someone else would reap the profits. As I'm sure it does happen. How do you get an agent without book success, who do you have to be. Everyone who is successful had to start somewhere. Even the Harry Potter author. Lulu provides a good platform to start with, and for me, may at this time be the only option. But don't stop trying. an editor once told me, to keep knocking on those doors.Even Dickens it's said had rejections.Follow your dream, and hope luck is on your side. Sometimes it's not what you can do, but who you know.Good luck.

  • moogster1 a écrit :
    Even Dickens it's said had rejections.
    Indeed, and many other famous writers. In France, Marcel PROUST was first published privately at author's expense, until he was discovered, and became famous. It is reported that André GIDE, already a prized author, when asked by the Gallimard publishing company whether PROUST's prose was worth printing flatly answered "forget it; it's illegible".

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