250-page textbook inner formatting

Hello All,

 

I am trying to create a 250-page textbook, only for my class and not for wider distribution yet. I am new to this tool and publishing in general, and have read through the Knowledge Base. 

 

As things stand, I have typed out each chapter in a different Word document (some 2003 version, some 2010). I am trying to get the book ready for publication. Yes, I need the front matter and the back matter too; let's assume I have that too. 

 

Is the way forward for me to:

 

1) first apply the downloaded style template to every chapter, make sure each chapter has an even number of pages. Then create a new document with the correct template,  paste everything into one document, set page numbers and define the headings, and auto-generate Table of Contents. Upload 3 separate files - front matter, book body and back matter.

 

OR

2) leave every chapter (including front and back matter) on its own, formatted within guidelines. Upload several files and let Lulu do the rest. Much easier, but how do Table of Contents and page numbers work. 

 

OR

3) Enhance (1) above by putting in section breaks for each chapter, to customize headers with the chapter name?

 

OR

4) Any other suggestions?

 

1 (and 3) seems tedious and clunky, and 2 will require manual TOC and Page numbers... equally tedious. Any workarounds? Or, since I have to put in the work, is there a better way with similar/ more effort? At a later stage, I want this to also be available in e-book format, etc., so I don't want to take a shortcut that will seriously constrain me later. 

 

Thanks much,

 

Sid

Comments

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    Hello,

    First of all the total number of your pages should be divisible by 4.  You'll have to make it 252 by adding 2 blank pages at the end.

    Second, a 252-page book should be a single file, unless it is a very heavy file that has to be divided into two or more sub-files to be converted to PDF and uploaded to Lulu.

    P.S. In case you have several big files, read Glenn's answer to my query in :

    http://connect.lulu.com/t5/General-Discussions/compound-book/m-p/340352

     

     

  • Thanks, Jean-Paul. 

    It seems like you are suggesting that I combine the front matter and the back matter into the main file too. In that case, I guess I should have section breaks to include the front and back matter.  

    Any other formatting strategies or tips? I have gone through the forums, but can't say that I have read every post. 

    -S

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    sidd_d a écrit :

    Thanks, Jean-Paul. 

    It seems like you are suggesting that I combine the front matter and the back matter into the main file too. In that case, I guess I should have section breaks to include the front and back matter.  

    Any other formatting strategies or tips? I have gone through the forums, but can't say that I have read every post. 

    -S


    You are welcome,

    What do you exactly mean by "front matter" and "back matter", the title page and what goes with it and the final page with "The End" on it?

    If you mean the front cover and the back cover, this is a completely different matter. You'll upload your picture for the front cover when you are prompted to by the "cover wizard". If you have no picture, just choose a colour background or opt for one of the ready-made Lulu covers.

    Do not mix-up your text and its cover.

  • By front matter, I mean the title page, dedication, introduction, preface, acknowledgements, etc. Technically, Table of Contents should also belong here, but may be easier to include that in the main body to use the Word autocreate features.

     

    By back matter, I mean everything after the last chapter (no epilogue in a textbook)...

     

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor

    Sidd, do yourself a huge favour and combine all your chapters, prematter and back matter in one Word document. Format without a template (based on the distribution guidelines and your preferences), convert to PDF and upload that.

     

    You will have a professional quality book as opposed to bits and pieces and shortcuts all over the place.

     

    It sounds like a big job but it's not. And your final Word document will be worth gold. You can easily make a few changes and convert to ebook.

     A citizen of the world.

  • Understood, Em_Press. Thanks. I'll do that. 

     

    Just based on other people's experience, should I create a section break for each chapter, or should i work with the minimum number of section breaks? Should I format chapter by chapter before combining, or work on formatting at the very end?

     

    I suppose every chapter should start on an odd-numbered page and end on an even-numbered page, even if it means including blank pages? Or is that not necessary? 

     

    Any other formatting suggestions (headers, page numbers, chapter headings, etc.) as i use Word for this big task?

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    sidd_d a écrit :

    By front matter, I mean the title page, dedication, introduction, preface, acknowledgements, etc. Technically, Table of Contents should also belong here, but may be easier to include that in the main body to use the Word autocreate features.

     

    By back matter, I mean everything after the last chapter (no epilogue in a textbook)...

     


    In that case all this means a single file, unless it is too large and you have to divide it up into two or several sub-files.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    sidd_d a écrit :

    Should I format chapter by chapter before combining, or work on formatting at the very end?

     

    I suppose every chapter should start on an odd-numbered page and end on an even-numbered page, even if it means including blank pages? Or is that not necessary? 

     

    Any other formatting suggestions (headers, page numbers, chapter headings, etc.) as i use Word for this big task?


    1) Do not format chapter-by-chapter - a source of errors and incompatibilities. Format the whole final file. Margins, etc. have to be the same from the beginning to the end.

    2) Yes all your printed pages should be numbered except the title and copyright pages, and the final page with "The End".

    3) Many authors have their chapters begin on odd pages, just like the title page, that must needs be an odd one.

    4) As your book is a didactic one, if you can add an index at the end, do it. Wordperfect, my word processor, generates it from the list I make. I suppose you can do the same with your own.

    5) I generally add a header in small characters that includes the printing date, i.e. that of the PDF conversion. Very few authors of didactic books do that. 

    Have a look inside this book of mine to see what I mean.

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/jean-paul-g-potet/yeats-and-noh/hardcover/product-22432677.html

     

     

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor

    Sidd, yes. Section breaks before chapters. Use Next Page (not odd/even page)  and add a blank page yourself manually if necessary (unlinked to previous).

     

    Tackle one thing at a time.  If you get stuck, come back here and ask.

     A citizen of the world.

  • My suggestion would be the method #1, above.

     

    I usually download the Lulu template for my size and format (I often work in US Trade paperback, at 6 x 9). I then cut and paste into this template. After that use Alt-A (select all) to any apply global changes that are needed (i.e., setting everything to Garamond font, or 12+ point font). 

     

    Sometimes I actually write the book in the template, thus saving formatting steps later.

     

    Yes, cutting and pasting is clunky. But you will be much more satisfied with the end product than if you use your method #2.

     

    Method #3 might be good, but I am frankly a bit unfamiliar and uncertain wrt Sections and Section Breaks.

     

    Since this is a textbook, I would invite you to use the Microsoft Word index feature. It takes some practice -- it can easily create redundant entries, and it is case sensitive -- but it would be very useful to your readers.

     

    I hope that helps.

  • On reading the remainder of the thread, I see that Em_Press and M. Potet have answered beyond my mere power to add or detract. I advise following their advice.

  • Thank you, all. I will follow these suggestions. 

     

    I am trying to create version zero, only for the students of my class (priced close to cost) and not for wide distribution. The class is in the fall and I am trying to get the book out (content as-is, but formatted suitably for lulu) asap. 

     

    So, I am formatting the book to be letter size, for this version. For my first formal edition, I may want to use a different size (unsure, based on feedback).  Is it a lot of work to convert the formatting from letter size to (say) trade size later? Anything I should keep in mind so that I can minimize that rework, should I need it. 

     

    Thank you guys; enjoy the summer!

     

    -Sid

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    sidd_d a écrit :

    Is it a lot of work to convert the formatting from letter size to (say) trade size later?


    No. Of course you do this on your computer. You just change the dimensions of your page and the margins, and everything should follow suit. Then you convert your file to PDF and send the PDF to Lulu.

    If you have columns, graphs, pictures, etc. adjustment will probably be necessary. 

    Generally, the best is to decide on the format from the very beginning.

    If your wordprocessor has the WYSIWYG facility, use it to examine the final result from the first page to the last one before you convert to PDF. Do the same with the PDF before uploading it to Lulu.

    As regards the choice of format, always think which is the most convenient both for reading and carrying in a student's satchel.

    Never use small fonts. Any size under 12pts will make reading uncomfortable.

  • Thank you.

     

    Discussing style elements of the textbook for a moment:

     

    I was thinking of using Garamond 11; Is that too small for the text? Will that look good in both printed textbook and e-book? The style guide suggests Verdana or Arial for e-books, and Times New Roman, Garamond or Palatino. Any other fonts that I should consider, purely based on aesthetics? What is the range of font sizes that is suitable?

     

    What line spacing and paragraph spacing should I use?

     

    Headers: The book will have 3 levels of headers, apart from Chapter headings. What fonts and font size should I use?

     

    I have a PDF writer and will embed fonts, so have flexibility in what I can use..

     

    I understand that there are no precise answers when it comes to these design aspects, but I was wondering if there are any thumb rules or norms that have emerged; just like the forums usually suggest Times New Roman or Garamond for the font. 

     

    Appreciate the help; thanks!

     

    -Sid

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    sidd_d a écrit :

     

    Garamond 11; Is that too small for the text? 

    I'd suggest Garamond 12pts

     

    What line spacing and paragraph spacing should I use?

    The default ones of your wordprocessor are the best. Why change them?

     

    Headers: The book will have 3 levels of headers, apart from Chapter headings. What fonts and font size should I use?

    In one of my books I have two headers. Header A is for the whole book, while each chapter has its own header B. A is in "fine" size and B in 10pts. (see picture)

     

     

    the forums usually suggest Times New Roman or Garamond for the font. 

    It's reasonable because these are accepted by every printer. I prefer Times New Roman.

    Do not use a font that is cannot be accepted by your PDF converter. Before sending your PDF to Lulu, check if all yours are included in its properties. If one is not, you'll have empty square bullets instead of the letters or symbols.

     

     

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