Oyster ebook site closure?

Hi everyone, it seems that Oyster Books have closed/shut down. I tried to access their site and it just shows up a screen shot. See the link.

 

https://www.oysterbooks.com/

 

There are several news reports online about the closure, a sample link is here.

 

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/4e80fbe8-60fa-11e5-97e9-7f0bf5e7177b.html#axzz40J5X55fo

 

I had several books listed on Oyster and sales as recently reported in as January 2016.

 

RIP Oyster. 

 

 

 

 

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/nickarmbrister Nick Armbrister's books

 

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Boom1 Jimmy Boom Semtex's books

Comments

  • Your news link is out of date, try this >> http://www.thebookseller.com/news/oyster-shut-down-312887

     

     

    I am not keen on this aspect though >> "... which listed titles on the $9.95 a month all-you-can-read service." How and what does the writer get paid? And should they not ask before adding books to such a service? Spotify has been sued by some artists over such things, perhaps this is why Oyster closed? Not viable?

     

    This is what was said when it started up >>   https://gigaom.com/2013/09/05/oyster-netflix-for-ebooks/

     

    This was an interesting claim >>  "But you will find real books that you have heard of, published within the last decade, from publishers that you have heard of ."

     

    To be frank, I have never heard of Oyster, but as one door closes another one opens. The world is your, erm ...

  • Oyster and Scribd have (had) the same payment plan - as has been discussed in the past.

     

    When someone downloads your eBook as part of their subscription, authors get paid when the reader consumes 20% of the book. That could be actual reading or clicking through pages. When the reader gets to 20% of the book, you get paid the full amount of the revenue associated with that book.

  • It does not sound feasible for a small flat rate per month. (Unless the sites are loaded with adverts also. Yawn.) So, if my books are read 1000 times a month that would mean I would be sent around £1,000? and that's just me, one person. I really doubt that. Sorry.

     

    Here's an example of the drawbacks  >>   http://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/oct/25/spotify-artists-sue-labels-music-streaming

     

    and this >> http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/12/29/461381862/musician-david-lowery-sues-spotify-for-copyright-infringement

     

    Many book copyrights also actually state that they cannot be used in such a manner, and surely the copyright holder/publisher should be asked first if they want to be on a flat-rate streaming service?

     

    And a 20% 'Preview', is ridiculous. Which is also often said here ...

     

  •  

    It's not a 20% preview - it's when a reader consumes or flips through 20% of a book they downloaded or collected.  I am sure that the site keeps up with the books each reader adds to their collection in order to prevent someone from collecting the same book 1000 times and then flipping through 20% of the pages in each of the 1000 books. Lulu has similar fraud protection.

     

    I am sure it is the same with SCRIBD and the Kindle subscription program.

     

    But, after all these years, I should know better than try to convince you otherwise.

     

    Good Day.

  • It's not a 20% preview - it's when a reader consumes or flips through 20% of a book they downloaded or collected. 

     

    Yes it is, if they can read up-to 20% free of charge. If it is not a preview then what is it?

     

    I am sure that the site keeps up with the books each reader adds to their collection in order to prevent someone from collecting the same book 1000 times and then flipping through 20% of the pages in each of the 1000 books.

     

    That's not what I said, and I would assume it's the first 20%, not random. But if that was possible they would only have to download 20% five times.  Smiley Very Happy What I said is if 1000 different people download my book, then such sites would owe me £1000. Mind you I suppose 1000 subscriptions at around $8 a month is of course $8,000 to pay it out of.

     

    Lulu has similar fraud protection.

     

    How? One cannot download an ebook on Lulu without pay for it in full. And it's up to the publisher what size of Preview they upload as a separate object.

     

    I am sure it is the same with SCRIBD and the Kindle subscription program.

     

    You mean the Kindle Lending library? It's an option for those who publish using Kindledirect, they get asked if they want to be in it. If they do then their mobi becomes 100% free via that scheme and contributors get some kind of share-out of a pot, if their book is downloaded. I have no idea about scibd. One cannot view the site unless one opens an account.

     

    But, after all these years, I should know better than try to convince you otherwise.

     

    Convince me of what? That people should be asked first before they are placed on such sites? Just as Kindle do. That some top creators have withdrawn their works because they also think they are unfair and should be asked first? And it's not just me in Lulu's forums moaning about such schemes.

     

    One problem is all the other book download sites around that steal the books. There's 1000s of them.

     

    Good Day.

     

    Yes it is. It's not raining.

  • It is obvious that you know much more than I do about this subject.

    I will refrain from any further clarifications or explanations.

     

     

  • potetjppotetjp Bibliophile
    Well concluded!
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