post distribution

According to the Knowlege Base if I want to make changes to the interior of a book AFTER approving it for distribution I simply go through the 'create new revision' process, purchase a copy and if happy reapprove distribution. However, I'm querying the note at the end of the article which is quote:

Please Note: Once your book is approved for distribution, you cannot change any of the following:

  • Title
  • Author
  • Binding type
  • Trim size
  • Interior color

Therefore, a couple of questions as I am considering editorial changes to the writing only:

 

1. Does this mean I CAN change the written interior without deleting or retiring the original project as long as I leave everything else mentioned above as it is?

2. My book already has appeared on Amazon, so will the newly approved one update and replace the one on Amazon?

3. Will it use the same ISBN or will another be assisgned? (Lulu seems to apply the same ISBN when revising a project) 

4. Will the current Amazon version still be available to purchase whilst the new one is updating.

Okay, it's four questions, just wanting to make sure I'm covering everything.Smiley Happy

 

 

Comments

  • Question 1
    No - Delete the old project and upload the new one
    Question 2
    Eventually yes - the new version will replace the old one
    in a few weeks' time.
    Question 3
    Yes - you use the same ISBN unless you are changing formats
    e.g. changing from paperback to hardback, in which case start
    a new project and request a new ISBN
    Question 4
    Yes - your current Amazon book will be available until
    replaced by the revision

  • Do you mean delete the 'old project' completely from 'My Projects' or are you just referring to the PDF file in the revision process? It's confusing as the Knowlege Base article says to 'create new revision' but mentions nothing about deleting or retiring the entire original project from the 'My Projects' list first.

  • Hrrmm, that's strange because before I realised what the Private option meant Smiley Surprised I revised my first novel many many times, and with an ISBN, and it did allow me to change all of those things. I do know that with an ePub with Dist almost everything is locked.

     

    All you can do is try. If it will not let you change them then yes, it will have to be a new Project with a new ISBN, and the previous Project Withdrawn/Deleted. (But will remain listed on other site for ever as Unavailable.)

     

    By Create New Revision it means to an existing file, normally before it's Approved, or if it has no ISBN, then it does not need to be Approved. (BTW, all that means is that you are happy with it, not that it's been approved anywhere else. That should eventually show up when you click Manage.)

  • When you do a revision, you'll reach the stage where the old file is enterred at the bottom of the page. Delete it before you upload the modified file, otherwise the new and the old files would be run together in a single volume.

  • Yes I understand that, Potetjp. I've done revisions previously BEFORE the approval stage and always deleted the old PDF first before uploading the revised one. My question concerns whether you can do this AFTER approval, particularly as my book now appears on Amazon.

    I would have thought that the same ISBN can be used as long as it DOES replace the one currently on Amazon, as I'm not changing anything other than the interior writing. I don't want to change the cover, title, format size or anything else I quoted from the Knowlwge Base article. It would look awkward if two inentical books appeared together on Amazon, even if one was unavailable.

    In the meantime I've put the project on 'private access' until I can make the changes. I would assume as Lulu books are POD, that Amazon also won't be able to access copies for the time being until I reapprove.

    The Knowlwge Base article was by Glenn, I was hoping he might shed some light on whether it's a case of 'scrap the entire project' or simply go through the 'create new revision' and reapprove process.


  • marquesa a écrit :

    I would have thought that the same ISBN can be used as long as it DOES replace the one currently on Amazon, as I'm not changing anything other than the interior writing. I don't want to change the cover, title, format size or anything else 


    Unless you mean small corrections, if you are changing the interior writing (your text), a revision is not enough, you have got to make a new edition with a new ISBN, even if the cover of the new edition is going to be the same as the previous one's, but with the new ISBN. 

    The best is to retire your present edition, wait until Amazon has withdrawn it from its catalogue, and make your second edition. Many don't have the patience.  Smiley Happy  In many cases both the old and the new edition are displayed by Amazon. As the author, you can enter your Amazon account, add the new edition ("this is my book"), and remove the old one. If the old edition remains all the same, the last resort is to ask for Amazon's help.

  • Please note: I am providing this information in a format which might benefit others who have the same query so if you already know something just gloss over it.

     

    There is nothing to force you to create a new edition if you don't want to. It might be considered best practice, etc. etc. but there is nothing physically to restrain you from changing your text and republishing the book without creating a new edition. I would imagine that editions are more critical for non fiction books than for fiction. For example, if you publish a science book and a year later some of what you said was out of date, or was proved incorrect, readers would expect an updated second edition to hit the shelves. For a self published author publishing a work of fiction I don't think anyone is going to get worked up about someone correcting typos and improving grammar. I doubt whether anyone will even say anything about a plot change; we are talking about miniscule sales here, not the output of an established publishing house. I know that some will disagree with what I am saying but it doesn't change anything: people can, and do, revise their books without creating a new edition.

     

    You can revise your book after approval, and listing, as many times as you want to. Whatever you upload last will feed through to Amazon in the usual way, and replace the book that was previously listed. There is no need to delete a project and start again.

     

    When you click on revise you will be taken to a screen which has your book title and your author name on it. You cannot change this so click OK to move onto the next screen which has your ISBN. Again, you cannot change this, so click OK.

    Delete the old file and upload the new and follow through to the end.

  • As long as what you're saying is correct, Daniel, it does answer my question. It is simple enough to completely delete the entire project and start again, but having two identical books together on Amazon would be confusing to customers, even if one was unavailable. A customer could easily click on the unavailable one and assume that it meant the same for both images. 

    By the way I deleted my first novel from My Projects about 3 months ago as I'm totally revamping it, but it still appears on Amazon as available.

  • Kevin and Potetjp are technically correct in saying that you should have a different ISBN if your revision makes your book materially different.

     

    However, I am also correct in saying that there is nothing to force you to do this and that many people don't do it. With non fiction is pretty clearcut as to what constitutes material difference but with fiction it is a little more difficult. No one would expect an author to get a new ISBN just to correct a few typos. Would a few more tweaks make the book materially different? Who knows? And who will slap your wrist if you don't create a new edition?

  • I've done revisions previously BEFORE the approval stage and always deleted the old PDF first before uploading the revised one. My question concerns whether you can do this AFTER approval, particularly as my book now appears on Amazon.

     

    Well in the past, I have. But never anything drastic, just moving punctuation around and things like that. Possibly things a reader would not even notice.

     

     

    I would have thought that the same ISBN can be used as long as it DOES replace the one currently on Amazon, as I'm not changing anything other than the interior writing.

     

    Each ISBN is tagged to one Project, so you have no choice but use the same ISBN when Revising one. It cannot be used for other Projects.

     

    I don't want to change the cover, title, format size or anything else I quoted from the Knowlwge Base article. It would look awkward if two inentical books appeared together on Amazon, even if one was unavailable.

     

    Yes it does, but it's not uncommon. Amazon like to leave them listed in case another advertiser has a used one for sale, and it will link off the original page to them. I think Lulu can request that Amazon remove any duplicates placed there by Lulu.

     

    In the meantime I've put the project on 'private access' until I can make the changes. I would assume as Lulu books are POD, that Amazon also won't be able to access copies for the time being until I reapprove.

     

    That's an interesting point, because it's not technically been Withdrawn or Deleted, just locked out of public view on Lulu's Spotlights.

     

    The Knowlwge Base article was by Glenn, I was hoping he might shed some light on whether it's a case of 'scrap the entire project' or simply go through the 'create new revision' and reapprove process.

     

    It depends on how drastic an edit it. If it changes the book greatly then it is really a new book so should be a new Project with a new ISBN. It also depends on if you have actually sold any ...

  • For a self published author publishing a work of fiction I don't think anyone is going to get worked up about someone correcting typos and improving grammar.

     

    Many would get worked up if they bought and read a book full of mistakes. It's best to sort them out before Approving, or even before it gets anywhere near Lulu.

     

    I doubt whether anyone will even say anything about a plot change;

     

    Unless some one buys and reads the same book twice, they would never know.

     

    we are talking about miniscule sales here, not the output of an established publishing house.

     

    No always. 50 Shades was first self-published on Lulu and apparently it's very poorly written. Some self-published books at times out sell ones from the large publishing houses (often because some already well-known names now self-publish.) Don't assume that just because a book has the clout of a major publisher behind it that they all sell in vast numbers, some rarely get beyond the first 5,000 print run, and they don't have to declare how many were returned by retailers unsold.

     

    http://www.stevelaube.com/what-are-average-book-sales/

     

    I know that some will disagree with what I am saying but it doesn't change anything: people can, and do, revise their books without creating a new edition.

     

    They indeed do. Major publishing houses do not though. They do their best to make sure a book is as perfect as possible before it gets published. Should we be any different?

     

    You can revise your book after approval, and listing, as many times as you want to. Whatever you upload last will feed through to Amazon in the usual way, and replace the book that was previously listed. There is no need to delete a project and start again.

     

    And just hope that buyers don't talk to each other about the contents. "What do you mean Fred died in chapter 36?! He did not!"  Woman LOL

     

  • Thank you, Kevin. My alterations wouldn't involve a plot change, but even though it's fiction, some of my initial research to authenticate the story has turned out to be flawed. It would however involve some place changes and turn out to be another thousand words possibly. 

    For that reason, I think it best to retire the project, wait until it's unavailable on Amazon and republish with a new ISBN.

    Thank you everyone for your input, it's much appreciated.

  • Thank you, Kevin.

     

    Smiley Happy

     

     

    My alterations wouldn't involve a plot change, but even though it's fiction, some of my initial research to authenticate the story has turned out to be flawed.

     

    I too write fiction, and usually SF. Some facts remain facts and others are only facts at the time of writing. If, for example, one reads early SF it can now seem comical, but it was often based on cutting edge tech of the time and how they thought it would progress, even 'science' thought to be valid at the time but now known to be nonsense. Should they be re-written? No! No matter how well something is researched it can soon become out of date.

     

    It would however involve some place changes

     

    Ermm, that's unusual because it's rare that place names change.

     

    and turn out to be another thousand words possibly. 

    For that reason, I think it best to retire the project, wait until it's unavailable on Amazon and republish with a new ISBN.

     

    Indeed, you are right because it will no longer be the same story. But it perhaps proves that nothing should be published until one is certain of it. It can be exciting to see one's book in print ASAP, but often it's best to step away from it for a month or two, go back and read it, and see if it's still valid and still makes sense. Because some of my books are serials I often have to re-read earlier ones to refresh my mind, and even after years I still see changes I could make, that other people may not even notice! But one has to ignore the temptation.

     

     

  • Kevin

     

    It is all very well saying:

     

    Many would get worked up if they bought and read a book full of mistakes. It's best to sort them out before Approving, or even before it gets anywhere near Lulu.

     

    I identified several errors within the very first line of Keep That Noise Down. We all make mistakes. In an ideal world we would take a year to write, edit and publish a book, just as traditional publishers do, but many of us are too excited about the next project to do that. It may have something to do with being realistic; ensuring that your book is totally perfect is no guarantee of any additional sales. Of course, a book that is without any errors is preferable to one which has a few errors which itself is preferable to one stuffed to the gills with errors.

     

     

  • That's the annoying thing about my own latest work. As far as grammar and typos go it was flawless and had been checked by a professional translator and proof reader. The flaw I discovered myself and could kick myself for not being more careful in my research sources. Always do further research on your research resources, I advise. (It wasn't wikipedia, by the way...I avoid that like it was the plague)

  • I identified several errors within the very first line of Keep That Noise Down.

     

    I really doubt you did. Nope I have just looked. There is not. It's pure English English.  Smiley Tongue

  •  In an ideal world we would take a year to write, edit and publish a book, just as traditional publishers do,

     

    And why should we not?

     

    but many of us are too excited about the next project to do that.

     

    Imagine that attitude with, say, cars.

     

    It may have something to do with being realistic; ensuring that your book is totally perfect is no guarantee of any additional sales.

     

    That's irrelevant. One tries to create as perfect as possible even simply for one's own satisfaction.

     

     

    Of course, a book that is without any errors is preferable to one which has a few errors which itself is preferable to one stuffed to the gills with errors.

     

    Indeed it is. One owes it to self-publishing not to continue its bad reputation.

  • That's the annoying thing about my own latest work. As far as grammar and typos go it was flawless and had been checked by a professional translator and proof reader. The flaw I discovered myself and could kick myself for not being more careful in my research sources.

     

    It's disturbing how many mistakes can be found even in books created by major publishing houses. And strangely it can vary from country to county with the very same books. I recently bought some used books in the UK by a famous UK fictionalist, and then discovered they had been published in Canada, and they were full of glaring typos. I have previously read the same books published in the UK and they had no mistakes in. Remarkably strange.

     

    Always do further research on your research resources, I advise. (It wasn't wikipedia, by the way...I avoid that like it was the plague)

     

    Regardless of wiki's rep, it's no longer as bad as people think, in fact 8 years ago it was independently tested against the EB and discovered to be more accurate than the EB. But it is always best to cross-reference everything. In fact not to do so can be plagerism.

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