paper colour

I'm considering using the A5 size for my next novel as this now meets distribution requirements. However, I notice that the only interior paper available for A5 is white as opposed to cream on the US Trade option. Is there any reason for this? I always associate plain white paper publications with non fiction and text books. Surely for a novel black print on cream is easier on the eye than white and A5 is a more traditional size for fiction works worldwide?

Comments

  • I'm considering using the A5 size for my next novel as this now meets distribution requirements. However, I notice that the only interior paper available for A5 is white as opposed to cream on the US Trade option. Is there any reason for this? I always associate plain white paper publications with non fiction and text books. Surely for a novel black print on cream is easier on the eye than white and A5 is a more traditional size for fiction works worldwide?

     

    Usually books are printed on recycled unbleached, or just unbleached paper, it's not dyed that colour to a sort of off-white. It's more environmentally 'sound'. They are not cream but more of a very light brown/beige. Bleached white is often used when a lot of images are used.

    Cream may be a little easier on the eye (most dedicated e-readers have greyish screens though for that reason) but most Lulu books are on virgin bright white paper, and one just has to compromise to get the book size one wants (and size and paper type if one wants an ISBN.)

    I did create a thread here about 'normal' paper and why do Lulu use bright white, but no one seemed to care enough not to take the **** about the post.

  • Cheers for that, Kevin. I would have thought that most fiction writers would choose the A5 format and therefore be crying out demands for Lulu to have off white paper as the default option. Unless it changes I may well stick to US Trade size. I'm just wondering how many Lulu clients actually publish their fiction on plain white? I prefer my writing to look like fiction and not a reference manual.

  • I use A5, but would rather use white than cream, although I much prefer unbleached. Looking through my huge collection of books, new and very old, none are cream, but very few are pure white (because wood is not white  Smiley Happy ) Lulu's stick out like expensively treated teeth amongst them, possibly that's because their printers use paper made for laser and inkjet printers, which has to be very smooth (and the machines will be loaded with white as standard.)

     

    I would assume many choose the cheapest option because POD is expensive so there's no need to make it cost even more. Wander in to a book shop and take a look at how many are cream or pure white.

     

    Fiction is fiction, it's the story that matters not if the paper is cream, white, pink or black.

     

    As I said, many non-fiction books that are heavy with images often use white because the white is not printed, it's the paper showing through. Some books even use very expensive paper with a gloss finish, if there are a lot of photos. Novels are almost always 100% text. Don't worry about it, I doubt a reader cares.

Sign In or Register to comment.