ISBN and Publishing Page Info

Hello, there seems to be a little bit of confusion on the instructions for the ISBN, the publisher info and the copyright info on the instructions page.

 

If we get a free lulu ISBN, it is stated that lulu becomes the publisher. As such, how would you list them under the publisher/copyright page?

 

Basically the copyright would belong to the author/company and also want to make the company the publisher and lulu would be the distributor.

 

Please advise.

 

Vk

Comments

  • I always put myself down as the publisher. I believe unless you buy a package from them where they supply the ISBN you put yourself down as publisher. They are the distributor/ printer. You can make up a name such I did, "Eight Winds Books." I looked it up on here and that is what I see so far.

  • I put the name of my website as the publisher, not that it means anything because when using ISBNs that Lulu have registered, other sites say Lulu is the publisher. I assume the fill in publisher slot is mainly only of use to those who use their own ISBNs.

     

    But on my Copyright Page I do put my website name as the publisher and there's no mention of Lulu within and on the covers of any of my books (apart from the ISBN barcode on the back cover if someone scans it.)

  • The ISBN is the international number of the book. You express your copyright on the book in the copyright page, hence the necessity to associate your name with the ISBN on this page.

    As a self-published author, you are the copyright owner of the book, and its publisher., while Lulu is its printer and distributor 

    For practical reasons, Lulu is treated as the printer-publisher by such companies as Amazon, etc.

    In other words, with Lulu,  you never lose your rights on your book.

  • The ISBN is the international number of the book. You express your copyright on the book in the copyright page, hence the necessity to associate your name with the ISBN on this page.

     

    But it does not. Take a look on Amazon, for example, who it says the publisher is. It's nothing to do with actual copyright, apart from the right of some publisher to 'copy'.

     

    Amazon >>>

     

    Product Details

    • Publisher: lulu.com (November 5, 2013)
    • Language: English
    • ISBN-10: 1291620982
    • ISBN-13: 978-1291620986

     

     

     

    As a self-published author, you are the copyright owner of the book,

     

    True.

     

    and its publisher.,

     

    True only in action.

     

    while Lulu is its printer and distributor 

     

    Lulu own the ISBN, therefore Lulu is the registered publisher. Annoying but true.

     

    For practical reasons, Lulu is treated as the printer-publisher by such companies as Amazon, etc.

    In other words, with Lulu,  you never lose your rights on your book.

     

    Dependent on contract a writer never loses copyright regardless of who publishes their books. That's true of both self-published and 'traditionally' published. Copyright is nothing to do with ISBNs.

     

    The bottom line is, with a Lulu ISBN Lulu are the registered publisher, and that's displayed on all sites when distributed to them.

     

    B & N >>

     

    Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9781291621112
    Publisher: Lulu.com
     
  • If a company like, say, Bloomsbury, UK, publishes your book, they own all the copyrights on your work and its adaptations. They pay you royalties proportional to the number of copies sold.

    If a scholarly journal like, say, Lingua, Elzevier, North-Holland,  publishes your article, it belongs to them,  and you receive no royalties.

    In both cases, you cannot have them published elsewhere without the written permission of the original publisher, and sometimes paying some fees.

    With Lulu, you can retire a book and publish it elsewhere without any more ado, except that you cannot use the Lulu ISBN. Bravo Lulu!

     

  • If a company like, say, Bloomsbury, UK, publishes your book, they own all the copyrights on your work and its adaptations.

     

    Only if they buy the copyright, if they do not then all they are getting is permission to publish the work, and by no means have any other rights. They will also have no rights to exclusivity on any further work from the same writer, or film or TV rights, unless it says so in a contract, hence why having to read them carefully. If that was not the case then it would not have the writer's name on copyrights, it would have the publisher's name. On Lulu we are both.

     

     

    They pay you royalties proportional to the number of copies sold.

     

    Indeed, but they do that even if they don't own the copyright. It's payment to the writer for allowing them to publish their book.

     

    If a scholarly journal like, say, Lingua, Elzevier, North-Holland,  publishes your article, it belongs to them,  and you receive no royalties.

     

    Contracts do vary, of course. But in the instance of some educational and scientific work, etc., etc., if it's written on 'company' time then it belongs to the employer. (The same applies to inventions.)

     

     

    In both cases, you cannot have them published elsewhere without the written permission of the original publisher, and sometimes paying some fees.

     

    No, it's the other way around. Most contracts ask for exclusivity prior to publishing, but not on everything a person writes, unless that's also previously agreed beforehand. There's often a get out clause that states if one publisher is not having much success, then the writer can cancel and go to another. And of course a publisher can stop publishing something if it's not making any money.

     

    One case was the lady who wrote Twilight. She sold the entire rights for not a lot of money. To rub salt in the wound she was later asked to write more of the series, but as a ghost-writer, by the film companies who did not know who she was!

     

    Another was the rights to Superman being sold for a few dollars.

     

    Then there's the Harry Potter woman who's agent read the contracts very carefully and now she has an estimated $1 billion in the bank.

     

  • Well ... I am talking out of experience, not from the top of my hat.

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