Copyright

I was just looking at a book posted in Shameless and on the Copyright Page it has a large Logo and registration number for this place >>    http://intellectualpropertyrightsoffice.com/

 

It's a private for profit company (it says so) and I wonder just what protection that big logo, and the actual company, gives to a book and if it's necessary to have such a logo and registration number within the book? I did not read the entire site but how do they check that the register is the actual copyright owner?

 

The site only takes 10mb digital files to log with them, though.

Comments


  • kevinlomas wrote:

    I was just looking at a book posted in Shameless and on the Copyright Page it has a large Logo and registration number for this place >>    http://intellectualpropertyrightsoffice.com/

     

    It's a private for profit company (it says so) and I wonder just what protection that big logo, and the actual company, gives to a book and if it's necessary to have such a logo and registration number within the book? I did not read the entire site but how do they check that the register is the actual copyright owner?

     

    The site only takes 10mb digital files to log with them, though.


    At least as far as the US is concerned, the answer to your question as to what protection this site offers is easy: Zero.

     

    It's also not cheap. A four-year registration costs $45. A copyright from the US Copyright Office costs about $35 and will last your lifetime (plus some).

     

    A copyright from the US Copyright Office is also the only copyright that will have any legal standing in court should a copyright ever need to be defended. 

     

    I suspect that the situation is similar in most other countries.

    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    At least as far as the US is concerned, the answer to your question as to what protection this site offers is easy: Zero.

     

    Indeed. Unless they have some way to assure that it's the client's property to copyright in the first place. Places I have my media on simply have a "do you have the right .." box to tick, no checks are made.

     

    It's also not cheap. A four-year registration costs $45. A copyright from the US Copyright Office costs about $35 and will last your lifetime (plus some).

     

    Indeed (part two) 75 years after death?

     

    A copyright from the US Copyright Office is also the only copyright that will have any legal standing in court should a copyright ever need to be defended. 

     

    I suspect that the situation is similar in most other countries.

     

    I can only speak for the UK, but perhaps all other countries but the US in that regard. UK courts, well, some lawyer one gets to represent a person in them to start with, will judge a case on any proof, not just on registration. Although some kind of legitimate registered proof from a place that actually does a search on any rights would help as evidence. So would a bucket full of dosh to pay that lawyer.

     

    https://www.gov.uk/topic/intellectual-property/copyright

  •  

    I suspect that the situation is similar in most other countries.

     

    I can only speak for the UK, but perhaps all other countries but the US in that regard. UK courts, well, some lawyer one gets to represent a person in them to start with, will judge a case on any proof, not just on registration. Although some kind of legitimate registered proof from a place that actually does a search on any rights would help as evidence. So would a bucket full of dosh to pay that lawyer.

     

    https://www.gov.uk/topic/intellectual-property/copyright


    This is what the US Copyright Office has to say about copyrights here:

     

    Copyright exists from the moment the work is created. You will have to register, however, if you wish to bring a lawsuit for infringement of a U.S. work. See Circular 1, Copyright Basics, section “Copyright Registration.”

     

    Registration is recommended for a number of reasons. Many choose to register their works because they wish to have the facts of their copyright on the public record and have a certificate of registration. Registered works may be eligible for statutory damages and attorney's fees in successful litigation. Finally, if registration occurs within five years of publication, it is considered prima facie evidence in a court of law. See Circular 1, Copyright Basics, section “Copyright Registration” and Circular 38b, Highlights of Copyright Amendments Contained in the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (URAA), on non-U.S. works.

     

    So far as that first point is concerned, it is clear that if you have "registered" your work through one of these private companies you will have difficulty if you wish to defend your work in a US court.

     

    By the way, the US has a reciprocal arrangement with most other countries when it comes to copyrights. Again, in the words of the USCO:

     

    The United States has copyright relations with most countries throughout the world, and as a result of these agreements, we honor each other's citizens' copyrights. However, the United States does not have such copyright relationships with every country. For a listing of countries and the nature of their copyright relations with the United States, see Circular 38a, International Copyright Relations of the United States.

     

    So far as the US and the UK are concerned, both nations are signatories to the same international treaties, so the copyrights in both countries are mutually respected.

     

     

     

    __________________________________________
    Black Cat Studios http://www.black-cat-studios.com/
  • Thus says the linked website:

     

    Users of this site should recognise that the IP Rights Office is designed to record, archive, and retrieve creative works; it does not become involved in or have any expertise regarding legal matters or disputes relating to copyright or other areas of intellectual property law. As such, it cannot offer any advice on these subjects, other than that relating directly to the recording/archiving/retrieving of creative works.

     

    Which, to me, says that the service does absolutely nothing regarding your rights except preserve your works with your name on them. In other words, it's an archival service, and the references to "Intellectual Property Rights" are misleading and deceptive.

     

    Further, note the design of the site, which is clearly intended to invoke a sense of being on an "official" or "Government" website, when in fact it is a commercial website.

     

    It is my opinion that this site is an attempt at defrauding people into believing they have registered a copyright on their works when in fact, they've done nothing of the sort.

  • My link? No, if you look at the address it is the UK Government's own site, but that never means the Gov cannot set up profit making companies to do tasks for them. The UK Gov in fact own a massive number of copyrights but I still bet they have to pay themselves to register them. Smiley Very Happy

     

    But the crux of the matter is, if any registration service does not include a search or use any other means, to ensure a person has a right to register a copyright, then it's all a bit pointless really. If someone rips someone off by beating them to, say, a first copyright of something they never created, how could one prove that? It would not be easy and it would be very expensive. Regardless of different laws in the US, registration still all seems to be a bit pointless.

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