Seemingly Endless Free Downloads After Ebook Purchase. Anyone else experience this?

I wrote a Custer book (Custer's Lost Officer...) and it has been my best selling book for years. I offer it in all formats. This past year I have had 11 or 12 free ebook downloads of this book all going to the UK. There is a large organized Custer fan group in the UK and I think they have gotten together and a number of them have been getting this download by saying they are a new device belonging to the one who did actually buy the book. Lulu doesn't seem to care but I think my book is being ripped off.  What do you think?

Comments

  • I questioned support about a couple of redownloads myself. I'm not sure if there is a way for them to tell or not. Torrent sites are my main worry which I did find one giving my book away.

  • I think its unreasonable for Lulu to assume an individual has purchased and is using 12 new devices in a year.  Its actually Apple who is giving mine away.  Kind of like the giant taking pennies from Jack.

     

    I'm not familiar with Torrent but I read a couple of posts about them ripping off pdf books?  Not sure what those are, is that your problem?

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Once a person has paid for and downloaded a digital file from their account they can then download it as many times as they wish. It often happens if people's file gets corrupted, or they get a new device.

     

    The only way other people can get hold of it from that same account is if the account holder gives them their log in details, which sounds unlikely. But one never knows.

  • oncewasoncewas Librarian

    I don't think that a dozen reloads in a year is excessive. I have 10 devices that I can read a book on and there are any number of reasons why people start reading a book on one device and finish reading it on another.

     

    The one nice thing about Kindle is they don't tell you when someone has accessed your book on another device. Why should they? I wish that other book stores would do the same. However, they do tell you when someone has returned one of your books. That really hurts at first, but when you read the Kindle forum you come to realize that it is extremely common.

     

    The most difficult thing for any author to do is to distance themselves from their work, but you have to learn to do it. People are often extremely harsh in their criticism of books - which are, after all, an author's work - in the way that they would not be of a colleague or an employee. Something about the internet seems to bring out the worst in some people. As an author you need to ignore people being nasty about your books, returning your books or downloading them on several devices. We have to believe the sales figures provided by the companies which sell our books; to do otherwise would only lead to unhappiness. Unless you can prove something is wrong, which most times you can't, you have to learn to trust.

  • So, you think this individual corrupted his files three times in one day? I don't think so.  I read a lot, but I don't keep a copy of the same book in every room in my house.  So I can't see someone downloading the same book 10 times unless they are making them available to those who haven't paid for them.  Piracy of almost everything happens, so I don't buy Apple's explanation.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    greenpheon7 wrote:

    So, you think this individual corrupted his files three times in one day? I don't think so.  I read a lot, but I don't keep a copy of the same book in every room in my house.  So I can't see someone downloading the same book 10 times unless they are making them available to those who haven't paid for them.  Piracy of almost everything happens, so I don't buy Apple's explanation.


    I was not aware that retailers inform publishers about who exactly buys or downloads an item. It's just classed as a sale or a nul-sale (the latter when re-downloaded via a site) not who the person is. (Most sites are very protective in regards to such details,including how many views your content gets.)

    You can always ask Apple again. Are you only listed on Apple?

  • My NOOK reader recently died. I bough another and redownloaded my my library.

     

    And as you say, there were 11-12 free downloads in the past year, which seems rather normal based on new iPhone and iPad release schedules.

     

    We have spoken with the iBookstore about this behavior, but they have no interest in changing this reporting behavior. Lulu is looking into filtering re-downloads from the feed to prevent author confusion.

  • I hope Lulu is looking into this.  I think they finally understand what I am saying.  That one $5.98 purchase of my book eighteen months ago should not allow an individual to download as many copies as they like for as long as they like.  Basically, I received 54 cents for each download.  That is not right.  Apple needs to restrict the number of downloads and the length of time they are available.  Personally I think one purchase will get you two downloads and then you can purchase it again for another two etc.  Authors receive very little revenue for their work.  If I want to get little revenue I'll go to a conventional publisher.

  • You downloaded your library, but you didn't download ten copies of each book did you?

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    I hope Lulu is looking into this.  I think they finally understand what I am saying.

     

    From Glenn's reply it seems they do not, and that you do not understand what the rules are.

     

     That one $5.98 purchase of my book eighteen months ago should not allow an individual to download as many copies as they like for as long as they like.

     

    Well it does, and the same applies to games. (Example >>  https://www.origin.com/en-gb/store/?no-takeover=true   )   I have to agree that it is a bit stupid, because if you destroy a printed book you have to buy another. If you damage a DVD, you have to buy another.

     

     

     Basically, I received 54 cents for each download.  That is not right.

     

    Only on new sales, and I assume that's the profit that you set.

     

     Apple needs to restrict the number of downloads and the length of time they are available.

     

    That's not a bad idea, and it's not only Apple that needs to do it, because it's possible on many sites, and not just e-books, but all e-media, and even on Lulu.

     

     Personally I think one purchase will get you two downloads and then you can purchase it again for another two etc.  Authors receive very little revenue for their work.  If I want to get little revenue I'll go to a conventional publisher.

     

    It's getting very complex now because some digital stuff is now leased to you streamed from the Cloud for a monthly fee.

    Courts also decide what can and cannot be done. Due to Apple insisting that people could not copy their Apple content from one device to another an EU court ruled that people could because the rule restricts a buyer's usage of what they have bought. Recently I think some EU court overruled that first rule. It goes back and forth like that about every 5 years.

     

    BTW. 'Conventional' publishers do not pay higher royalties and they rarely sell direct anyway, so the same rules apply to them.

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