Amazon vs. All Else

How are everyone's sales on Amazon compared to all the others. My sales on Amazon seem almost nonexistant as I sell more on Inook and Ibook than anywhere else which lowers my income quiet a bit. Amazon is where I work hard to adverstise and link people too but paperback sales where the real money is just doesn't happen. What about you guys.

Comments

  • HULSEYHULSEY UK Publisher

    On the contrary. The majority of my sales are through Amazon, although most of these are e-books. Actually, the book sales usually show on the 7th of the month, but so far, nothing. Is there a delay with Amazon sales? Also, I'm starting to recieve e-mails from Lulu, asking why I have abandoned them. This could be no further from the truth, as I'm currently rewriting and republishing all of my novels. Anyone else recieving these e-mails? ShadowMonkey, I would guess that eighty percent of my sales are through Amazon.

  • Your "although most of these are ebooks" comment is probably what Shadowmonkey means. Ebooks sell on Amazon, paperback sales have fallen off a cliff.

    But I've found Shadowmonkey for all our keyword research most folks selling ebooks through in large quantities are doing things like paid advertising on sites like BookBub, etc, to bring a large amount of potential buyers to their Amazon product pages in a short time. And BookBub has over 100,000 subscribers, so that's a lot of potential buyers who are exposed to your ebook and folks who use them have their sales soar.

    BookBub aside. I think more indy folks like us should look deeper into advertising using places like PRWeb, etc, to get the word out to the general public, bookstores, and book industry about our books. PRWeb and other press release sites aren't very expensive and could help indy guys like us reach beyond our grasp promotion wise.

    Dee

  • Dee

     

    I'm curious about your comment 'paperback sales have fallen off a cliff'. Why would this be?

     

    Personally, I would never buy a paperback unless it was one I really, really wanted and even then I would probably go into a bookstore and buy it rather than order it from Amazon and wait for it to be delivered. However, with ebooks I make loads of impulsive purchases. If I can get a book immediately, and it costs $0.99, I hardly think twice. I have built up a collection which I have yet to read. Stupid, I know, but I wonder how many other people do this?

     

    On the other hand, I did see someone mention in the Kindle forum that they had only sold 2 copies of the ebook version of their book as opposed to 300 paper copies.

     

    It would be wonderful if there has been a Lulu author who has had some success - let's say 10 000 copies sold - and would be prepared to tell us how they did it. Which marketing strategies did they use? What drove their sales? Come on out of the woodwork and let us know!


  • danielblue wrote:

    Dee

     

    I'm curious about your comment 'paperback sales have fallen off a cliff'. Why would this be?

     

    Personally, I would never buy a paperback unless it was one I really, really wanted and even then I would probably go into a bookstore and buy it rather than order it from Amazon and wait for it to be delivered. However, with ebooks I make loads of impulsive purchases. If I can get a book immediately, and it costs $0.99, I hardly think twice. I have built up a collection which I have yet to read. Stupid, I know, but I wonder how many other people do this?

     

    On the other hand, I did see someone mention in the Kindle forum that they had only sold 2 copies of the ebook version of their book as opposed to 300 paper copies.

     

    It would be wonderful if there has been a Lulu author who has had some success - let's say 10 000 copies sold - and would be prepared to tell us how they did it. Which marketing strategies did they use? What drove their sales? Come on out of the woodwork and let us know!


    Daniel. You answered you're own question when you said "If I can get a book immediately, and it costs $0.99, I hardly think twice. I have built up a collection which I have yet to read. Stupid, I know, but I wonder how many other people do this?"

     

    Both of your questions actually. With ebooks now $.99 or even free people tend to collect or even hoard them nowadays. Which spurs authors to put out a ton of poorly written dribble in popular genres (vampire romance, etc) because they know they can sell a bunch at $.99 and make a quick buck. I'm telling you ebooks are quickly going to have the same stigma that indy published print books have had to overcome for years now.

     

    The only marketing tool that worked for me 100% of the time was Amazon's listmania. Remember that anyone? When Amazon did away with it a couple of years ago my book sales went right into the toilet almost over night. Listmania gave books visiblity on Amazon like nothing else before or after it. But folks were abusing it so I understand why Amazon did away with it. Although a sale is a sale and it makes them money either way.

     

    Dee

  • I personally hate ebooks. I watched someone read my book on their iphone the other night and thought that looks so boring. Where's the feel of the pages and cover as you turn them? Putting a paper bookmark in between the pages to remember where you were. I have a book shelf full of books I love to look at and admire. Also Amazon keeps lowering my book to $3.03 from the $3.99 I listed it at. So I raised it again through lulu. It listed at my price for 3 weeks now it's back to the lower price. How can I still make the profit listed on the manage page if Amazon lowers the price almost one dollar. Then they raise the paperback price up one dollar. Looks like they are trying to kill paperback sales in option for ebooks.

  • I mostly direct people to lulu or send them a link to lulu, so that's where most of my sales are. Amazon sales are a drop in the bucket for me. I'm roughly a 50/50 split on ebook versus print -- I'm with you, ShadowMonkey, I like the feel of a paper book. It invites you to pick it up and read it.

     

    My marketing has been 99% word of mouth here and there, but I intend to be much more aggressive with my next book.

  • Still if you do not mind against e-books, you may try Noon Store (nstore.noonint) - quite an interesting option

  • Hi

     

    I have only recently started promoting and have sold 2. any tips guys. you al seem to be selling loads.

     

    Thanks 

    SD

  • http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/23/business/media/the-plot-twist-e-book-sales-slip-and-print-is-far-from-dead.html?_r=0

     

    The same kind of thing happened with music. 'They' said Compact Cassettes would kill off vinyl. Never happened. CDs would kill off vinyl. Almost did, but 'real' records were still made and carried on to be bought. MP3s would kill all other options off. Not exactly. In fact many people are going back to vinyl because they say it sounds better (!!) The massive HMV shop not far from me is still full of people buying CDs, DVDs, and vinyl. The huge Waterstones just across from it still does very well out of printed books.

     

    I like printed books. For a start it's possible to buy four for a £1 from charity shops. I don't own a portable book reading device and don't want one.

     

    But I have to say that my Kindle books (direct to Amazon) do better than my printed books because it's hard to compete with mass-produced books via POD, whereas e-books don't have to be printed (or shipped.)

     

    But nothing does well unless people know it's there to buy.

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