Editing

I was just wondering where most of you go for editing? Do you self edit or do some of you actually pay for an editor? I'm in the edtiing process for my first novel and I'm trying to self-edit. Its a much bigger pain in the tucus than I anticipated haha

Comments

  • I self-edit, and self-publish. For a given book, the best is to wait long enough to read its proof as something new. Only then do the typos and errors become obvious. Often two or more private proofs are necessary before the book is worth distributing, and requires a Lulu ISBN.
    I also send free copies to a few friends and colleagues. I sometimes receive their feedbacks.
    I am always anxious to publish something faultess, but this is almost impossible to achieve. I noticed commercial books from big publishers may also contain typos. I sincerely admire newspaper staffs who manage to issue daily articles while making very few mistakes over a year.

  • BThomas90 wrote:

    I was just wondering where most of you go for editing? Do you self edit or do some of you actually pay for an editor? I'm in the edtiing process for my first novel and I'm trying to self-edit. Its a much bigger pain in the tucus than I anticipated haha


    It my long-held and firm opinion that no author should attempt to self-edit for the simple reason that an author lacks the necessary objectivity to do an effective job.*

     

    There are actually two different kinds of editing, each of equal importance.

     

    The job of the editor is to oversee the overall sense of a book. His or her concern is not punctuation, spelling or grammar but rather content, form and style. 

     

    copy editor is in charge of making sure the book is correct in grammar, punctuation and spelling. Sometimes a copy editor will also act as a fact checker, making sure things like names, places and dates are consistent and correct.

     

    In both cases an author is at a disadvantage. To take a simple example, there may be something in their book that makes perfect sense to the author but would only confuse or baffle a reader. This thing will continue to make sense no matter how many times the author reads their manuscript. And if an author is poor at spelling, grammar or punctuation reading their book ten times over is not going to make them any better. (And things like Spell Check and Grammar Check are no substitutes for a human editor.)

     

    *This is not to say that there have not been exceptions...but these are rare and their very rarity underscores my point.

  • :/ I really wanna do this right but I can't afford an editor (they're so abhorrently expensive) and so far all I wanna do when I try to edit it myself is burn the manuscript... >_>

  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym ✭✭✭

    BThomas90 wrote:

    :/ I really wanna do this right but I can't afford an editor (they're so abhorrently expensive) and so far all I wanna do when I try to edit it myself is burn the manuscript... >_>


    A trick I sometimes use is to put the manuscript into my sock drawer for a few weeks. Sometimes, it's up to six months. Then I read it as if someone else wrote it. I may even imagine a specific person, and from my knowledge of how they react to things, I read it as if I am that person.

     

    Another trick is to follow up the sock-drawer trick by printing the manuscript and then re-typing it from scratch. This will usually make you think about what it says, and will help you to catch errors.

     

    Finally, twist the arms of several friends and press-gang them to be beta-readers. Tell each that he or she must find at least three things that they do not like about the story. This will get them away from "Oh, it's pretty good for something written by someone I know" and into "I have to find three things wrong" mode.

     

    If you know a retired English teacher with a sour disposition, a favorite bright red pen, and borderline OCD, that would be a great person to use as a Beta-reader.

  • I use Elance. I had a 34,000 word book edited for $160, which included proof reading. Well worth it! I had bids from $60 to $500, but the ones at $60 coodint spel nuffing gude at ol and used small i instead of 'I', which made it relatively easy to choose.
  • I need to edit my projects
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