How the Big retail book stores obtain my book

Does the Global reach distribution (or Ingram) include books stores in Canada, such as Indigo, Chapters and Coles. I talked to a Manager at Indigo about stocking my book and he did not seem to know anything about Global reach distribution or Ingram. He wanted to know if my book was in his (Indigo's system). Does Indigo have their own internal system or can Indigo order my book from (who I don't know, I presume Lulu) just by searching the ISBN number? 

 

Who can advise? Thank you.

Comments

  • I think that some countries have a different distributor so instead of Ingrams it maybe someone else. I ran into that when I contacted some out of country bookstores about added my book to their listing. Just give them the ISBN and title then they can check for it.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    In France, French books are referenced in a centralized data bank for retailers that has no connection with Ingram. As a consequence, French bookstores do not have my Lulu books, but interested readers can buy them from Amazon.

    Amazon France has a special section for books in foreign languages; this is where my books in English are displayed. My books in French are in the general department. In Amazon Japan, both my books in English and my books in French are displayed in their English book department.

    There are also other online bookstores in various European countries as well as India that offer my books, whichever the language. I suppose these subscribe to Ingram.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    There's a lot of book retailers that have their own place to order from. Big chains also often have a central buying department.

    One big problem with POD books is they do not have Sale Or Return advantages for retailers. That only really applies to bricks and mortar stores though.

     

    I think Global Reach is just a Lulu term.

     

    Interestingly enough, I have just looked on Indigo's site and my 'Kobo' e-books are there, via no additional action on my part. No Previews though.

  • Suppose that the Borders in your town (I know, there isn't one) decides to order 20 copies of your book. They look you up in the Ingram's guide, "Books in print." this tells them who to call to order your book, namely Lulu. So they order books from Lulu. Or...

     

    Let's say that John's Books of Yourtown wants 20 copies. They buy through a book distributor, Bill's Books. Bill's Books looks up the ISBN through Ingrams and places and order through that channel. And shazam, Ingrams calls Lulu, and the rest is history.

  • Book stores all over the world can purchase your book directly from Ingram, who will print the book and ship it to the book store. Ingram pays Lulu, Lulu pays the author (you).

     

    I don't know if Chapters buys from Ingram. In a chain like that chances are that the manager doesn't know either. Books are probably shipped from a warehouse owned by Indigo (Chapters parent company), and stores likely don't deal at all with distributors like Ingram. You may have an easier time with indie book stores, as many of them do buy books from Ingram. Some of them even have an Espresso Book Machine, which means that they can print your book instantly. They still buy it from Ingram, and you still get your cut. This scenario works best for everyone involved. You get your book on the shelf, the book store has taken minimal risk since they only need to buy one copy at a time, and the customer can buy your book and not have to wait (and pay) for shipping. Look into it. You can find indie book stores here.


  • rdpruden wrote:

    Book stores all over the world can purchase your book directly from Ingram, who will print the book and ship it to the book store. Ingram pays Lulu, Lulu pays the author (you).

     

    I don't know if Chapters buys from Ingram. In a chain like that chances are that the manager doesn't know either. Books are probably shipped from a warehouse owned by Indigo (Chapters parent company), and stores likely don't deal at all with distributors like Ingram. You may have an easier time with indie book stores, as many of them do buy books from Ingram. Some of them even have an Espresso Book Machine, which means that they can print your book instantly. They still buy it from Ingram, and you still get your cut. This scenario works best for everyone involved. You get your book on the shelf, the book store has taken minimal risk since they only need to buy one copy at a time, and the customer can buy your book and not have to wait (and pay) for shipping. Look into it. You can find indie book stores here.


    The espresso book machine is very cool. I'd never seen that before. Is it merely a POD workstation, or is it fully automated?

  • Thanks everyone. good discussion.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    The espresso book machine is very cool. I'd never seen that before.

     

    Perhaps you should click the links I often put in the forums then  Smiley Happy

     

    Is it merely a POD workstation, or is it fully automated?

     

    Well it's both. It's like a vending machine that makes a book from a PR PDF, but only of one size usually.

     

    There's not many around because they are not cheap and neither are the books they can make. It's one of those inventions that seemed amazing at the time, but is impractical due to costs, but there are many different types now, bigger ones that cost even more.  It's not what most POD companies use.

     

    http://bookseller-association.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/is-amazon-poised-to-steal-print-on.html

     

     

     

     

  • Actually, the EBM makes books in all sizes up to 8.25x10.5. That's according to On Demand Books.

    Since I last posted I've done a little more research into them, and it appears that Lulu books actually don't show up on that system, as Ingram books don't automatically go into EBM. It is an option, but you you would have to go to Lightning Source directly to do it.

    ODB does offer a Self Publishing package that allows you to enter your book directly into EBM, but the cost is a little steep ($7.00 + $.03/pg on top of a setup feeof at least $99.00). I did the arithmatic, and Lulu is cheaper for printing. That said, you don't need to mark it up much.

    I would love to see a bunch of smaller book stores with one of these. Imagine buying books at a Kiosk, printed while you wait. Maybe even in a coffee shop. I'm not sure how long it will be before that happens, or if it ever will. I do like the idea though.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    What kind of cover can an EBM make?

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    I would love to see a bunch of smaller book stores with one of these.

     

    Unfortunately most of them shut, even big ones like Waterstones almost shut down and was saved by selling to some rich Russian for £1. He also bought HMV's shops which also almost closed down.

     

    Imagine buying books at a Kiosk, printed while you wait. Maybe even in a coffee shop. I'm not sure how long it will be before that happens, or if it ever will. I do like the idea though.

     

    I think that was the original intention, but they cost too much and the price does not seem to be falling. Amazon said they were going to open real shops and some would have them in, but they never did. Some flag-ship shops in the UK have them in, but only in London. Some universities have them, but I think mainly for printing internally created things only.

     

    Supermarkets sell hardbacked books in the UK, with dustjackets, for half the retail price marking them up under £10, they are mass-produced, so what would they cost created in store on a POD machine?

     

    Perhaps the cost of the machines (but not the books) could be offset if they could be leased in the same manner as photocopiers that so many shops have. But if they do not sell books in the first place would they be interested?

     

    Some people do still like 'real' books, but perhaps the invention of e-books has more or less killed off the idea of a book making machine in shops?

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