Google Play

Sorry if this has been asked before but I have just noticed that a lot of my books are for sale on Google Play.

 

As far as I am aware I have never had a sale through Google Play. Presumably this was distributed through Ingrams? How would it show up on a sales report?

 

I wonder if anyone would bother to buy anything on Google Play when Google makes so much of the book available for free.

 

Do we have any choice if we want our books on Google Books or not?

Comments

  • @danielblue - You beat me to the announcement. 

     

    As of today, eBooks in Kobo and Everywhere Else distribution (through Ingram) are now available for purchase on Google Play.

     

    If you would like to remove your eBook from Google Play, click on the Manage distribution icon for the project, deselect Kobo and Everywhere Else from your distribution options. Please note, by deselecting this option, you will also remove your eBook for all other retailers in Ingram's eBook distribution network.

     

    As to Google Play displaying so much of your book, if I have invested time in browsing through 20% of your book, it is very likely that I will also invest the $$$ so that I can finish reading it.

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor

    That's amazing news. The first thing I noticed on my new Smart phone was Google Play and the books listed on there.

     

    It was on my bucket list to get around to adding mine. Now Lulu just did it! Fabulous! Thank you.

     A citizen of the world.

  • LarikaLarika Bibliophile

    I was surprised to find my book on Google Play and even more surprised to find that they were showing 5 chapters. However as Glenn says, if anyone reads so much of the book then it's likely that they will invest the small amount it costs to read it all. I shall leave my book on Google Play.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    I only do printed books, but I certainly wouldn't refuse to be advertised by Google Play. Every free advertising is welcome.

    I once bought a printed book thanks to Google. It was a study on the Malay world. After I read the pages displayed, I clicked on the link to Amazon to buy it.


  • potetjp wrote:

    I only do printed books, but I certainly wouldn't refuse to be advertised by Google Play. Every free advertising is welcome.

    I once bought a printed book thanks to Google. It was a study on the Malay world. After I read the pages displayed, I clicked on the link to Amazon to buy it.


    Only print? That is as ill-advised as going only eBook. It's entirely your choice, but I would give serious thought to distributing your book digitally as you will reach the segment of the reading market that only buys eBooks. Also, you can charge less for them and still make more money for yourself.

  • If you found your book there and only showing 5 chapters then, maybe it's a free sample.
  • If you found your book in google play and only 5 chapters are shown then, maybe it is only free sample.
  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    rdpruden a écrit :
    Only print? That is as ill-advised as going only eBook. It's entirely your choice, but I would give serious thought to distributing your book digitally as you will reach the segment of the reading market that only buys eBooks. Also, you can charge less for them and still make more money for yourself.

    Only printed books last for a long time, and do not require the use of a device or a machine to read them. I can read the facsimile of an 1613 dictionary, but I can no longer read the digitized version of an 18th-century French encyclopedia I bought at the turn of the century. My computer cannot read some of my own archives on DVDs either, while the few printed pages I kept are still perfectly legible. To me a book that is not printed does not exist. It's only a virtual thing that can disappear overnight. and be lost forever.

    As regards e-book versions of my printed book, I would have a lot of technical problems making them because of the many restrictions involved. I have no time for that.

  • My earlier statement was in regards to selling to your readers. If you, as a reader, preffer to read paper only, then a book only available as an eBook will not reach you. There is a huge market that only reads eBooks, and your personal preference will do little to disuade them. In these cases, your print book will not reach them.

     

    I'm a little concerned that your eBook that your eBook encyclopedia is no longer readable. It sounds to me like the book was a one-time download, much unlike any eBook stores that I would even consider buying from. I like the idea of being able to redownload the file at any time, and these sites often ensure that their books are always readable.

     

    I don't have much to say in regards to time spent formatting. I know that there are some services available, though price may also be an issue.

     

    You are, of course, free to do as you wish. I simply submit food for thought.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    rdpruden a écrit :

    I'm a little concerned that your eBook that your eBook encyclopedia is no longer readable. It sounds to me like the book was a one-time download, much unlike any eBook stores that I would even consider buying from. I like the idea of being able to redownload the file at any time, and these sites often ensure that their books are always readable.


     

    I had a computer, but no Internet connection at that time because it was extremely expensive in France.

    I bought this encyclopedia (l'encyclopédie de Diderot) from its manufacturer after I saw its advertisement in some magazine. It was recorded on CDs; these were accompanied by a how-to booklet; everything was oacked in a nice cardboard box.  The original text was displayed alongside its typed copy, the latter being searchable.
    You have in mind downloadable books. Perhaps you are right.

     

  • I have to agree.  I hate ebooks as they are ugly and I can't hold them in my hands. There's something about a hard copy book that is awesome and I enjoy seeing the collection on my book shelf. Ebooks also can't be autographed. I have an autographed copy of Iron and Silk by Mark Salzman. Got it in person. I also have an autograph from Jackie Chan not in person but I sent it to him. Can't do that with ebooks and  they are more valuable. I have a friend who makes $60,000 a year just selling autographed and rare books on Amazon. That will never happen with ebooks. I only make the ebooks to make more money but have considered getting rid of them to make more in prints. If people want the book I think they'll buy it in print. Sadly though most of my sales are in ebook and I make less money this way.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    Shadowmonkey a écrit :

    I have to agree.  I hate ebooks as they are ugly and I can't hold them in my hands. There's something about a hard copy book that is awesome and I enjoy seeing the collection on my book shelf. Ebooks also can't be autographed. I have an autographed copy of Iron and Silk by Mark Salzman. Got it in person. I also have an autograph from Jackie Chan not in person but I sent it to him. Can't do that with ebooks and  they are more valuable. I have a friend who makes $60,000 a year just selling autographed and rare books on Amazon. That will never happen with ebooks. I only make the ebooks to make more money but have considered getting rid of them to make more in prints. If people want the book I think they'll buy it in print. Sadly though most of my sales are in ebook and I make less money this way.



    Indeed. It is hard to match all the advantages of  a printed book. Also, as you say, the physical presence and the beauty of such books are a gret source of pleasure.

  • Would be great to give the option to select "Google Play" as opposed to "Kobo and Everything Else", because some publishers already have their titles on "Google Play" and have for years. It would be nice to still have the titles go to Kobo. Thank you for the terrific service, Lulu is great.

  • I hate ebooks as they are ugly and I can't hold them in my hands.

     

    Great. That's you. That doesn't reflect the whole book-buying market. Personally, I prefer eBooks.

     

    If people want the book I think they'll buy it in print.

     

    Some may, but not all. I dare say not most.

     

    Sadly though most of my sales are in ebook and I make less money this way.

     

    How is it possible that you're making less money per eBook than per print book? Either your print books are prohibitively expensive or you've greatly undervalued your eBook.

  • I'm also surprised to see my books on Google Play, however, none of the titles appear to be loading, so now I have unhappy customers calling me about something I have no control over. What's up?
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    It's also beyond Lulu's control. Ask your customers is if it's just your books or all books on that site.

Sign In or Register to comment.