Joint Authorship


I am a self-published author who’s based in Northern England. Over the last several years, I have released an assortment of literature in both electronic and non-electronic format. During the course of this year, I hope to establish a literary collaboration with a Californian based lady. The intention is to self-publish a sample of our academic work to a particular market niche. You can assume that our contributions would be fairly distinct. It should be clear to the reader who’s written what.

 

However, before taking this step I would you kindly explain what implications this kind joint authorship would have in the areas:
1) Copyright law
2) Payment of Royalties
3) The setting up of joint accounts
4) Tax payments in America
5) Other legal and technical issues

 

Also would there also be any differences if we published in electronic or non-electronic form? As this inquiry involves technical matters you are most welcome to take your time before making a response. You will rightly gather that I’m very determined to get things right the first time around.

Comments

  • Em_PressEm_Press Professor

    Hello,

     

    You can get a copyright certificate in both names. It should cost about $30.

     

    You can add both names to the copyright page, title page and cover of the book.

     

    You can add a second author to one project, and assign royalty splits at 50% each.

     

    The project can only be published in one account. If all the projects in this account are joint, you can both have the password and full control.

     

    You need to fill out the appropriate tax forms, or accept a 30% tax withholding.

     

    Here is the link with more information:

    http://connect.lulu.com/t5/Tax-Withholding/Royalties-and-Tax-Withholding/ta-p/33384

     A citizen of the world.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    I am a self-published author who’s based in Northern England. Over the last several years, I have released an assortment of literature in both electronic and non-electronic format. During the course of this year, I hope to establish a literary collaboration with a Californian based lady. The intention is to self-publish a sample of our academic work to a particular market niche. You can assume that our contributions would be fairly distinct. It should be clear to the reader who’s written what.

     

    Indeed. Both names need to be on the cover and you can have more than one copyright on a Copyright Page, or just one joint one. The latter is the usual thing with joint projects. (c) 2050: Fred and Mary Smyth.

     

    However, before taking this step I would you kindly explain what implications this kind joint authorship would have in the areas:
    1) Copyright law

     

    It's automatic by worldwide agreements/laws as soon as you make some work tangible. There's no need to register the fact, but in the USA you cannot take a person to court for infringement unless you do register a copyright there. Perish the thought you need to take someone to court because is costs a fortune. But you need to sort out the rights with the co-writer first. Trust or not to trust. Or do two publications.

     


    2) Payment of Royalties

     

    There's a method on Lulu to split those if you wish to. Again you have to work this out with the co-writer.


    3) The setting up of joint accounts

     

    Not possible as such, you have to do what Maggie suggests, which requires trust.


    4) Tax payments in America

     

    Indeed, very annoying because the US tax people insist on withholding payments even from companies you are not employed by unless you prove you are not a US citizen. They are not as trusting as other countries!    http://connect.lulu.com/t5/Creator-Revenues/tkb-p/royalty_faq%40tkb


    5) Other legal and technical issues

     

    That's a wide subject and you need to be more specific, but there's here >>   http://connect.lulu.com/t5/Print-and-eBooks/tkbc-p/forums_kb

     

    Also would there also be any differences if we published in electronic or non-electronic form?

     

    Differences in what way? They are all books needing copyrights and possibly ISBNs, the latter if you wish to have them distributed

     

    As this inquiry involves technical matters you are most welcome to take your time before making a response. You will rightly gather that I’m very determined to get things right the first time around.

     

    They are questions asked a lot   Smiley Happy

  • Papi_SoñolientoPapi_Soñoliento Southern Escarpment Hill Country Teacher

    Regarding e-book and print publication the copyright(s) would cover both but the ISBNs would differ by format. If you did epub, digest format, trade format, and pocket book format of the work you would need four different ISBNs.

  • potetjppotetjp Professor

    Several decades ago, I published a book with a colleague. The royalties of each were proportional to the number of pages he wrote.

    The same principle is applied to my contribution to a language encyclopedia published in 2011.

  • I recommend having some sort of an agreement in writing regarding copyright and so forth. You may both feel, right now, that you both understand the whole thing, and that you'll both do the right thing without all the formalities. That might be correct.

     

    Or you might be thanking your lucky stars that you dashed off a quick note that outlines what each is to contribute, and what each will receive in revenues and rights.

     

    A couple quick paragraphs and a pair of signatures can settle future arguments very quickly.

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