How did he do that?

I've just been wandering around lulu.com, clicking here and there, reading this and that. I was surprised, to say the least, to find that this weeks No.1 choice,  (251 on the Lulu sales rating list) 'Living in life's Evening' by Martin Girard, was published on February 4th 2015. There are two possible explanations for this. Either:

1. He's sold a riduclous number of copies in a very short space of time in a rather limited subject area. Or:

2. He's had this book here for a while (maybe years) and had just done a content review.

 

I wish I could ask Martin what his marketing plan is, or ask him what I'm doing wrong...

 

Of course I'm happy for him, but it got me wondering what are the average sales figures for books, here. Is there a big difference when you distribute through globalreach etc.?

How much of a mark up is really marketable?

 

You know, the usual insecure writer's worries...  

 

 

Comments

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    One would have thought that the book at Number 1 would also be at Number 1 in the sales rankings, not at 251.

     

    There's a few possible answers.

     

    He paid for Lulu to create the book.

     

    He paid Lulu to promote the book.

     

    One of Lulu's staff read it, liked it, and stuck it there.

     

    Smiley Happy

    How Do. Pull up a chair. Would you like a cup of tea? Don't sit in that chair!!
  • I think the sales ranking is an 'all time' ranking where as the No.1 is for the current week/month/day whatever.

     

    Any idea about how many books that translates into?

  • It's really all about the numbers and the revenue. There is no comspiracy or staff intervention involved - but if one believes in ghosts, one sees them at every turn.

     

    Category rankings are calculated for relatively short periods of time. A large self-purchase order of books could easily propel an author into a top-ten position for a few days.

     

    Sales rankings are determined by the total amount of sales. Therefore a low priced book will have to sell more copies than a high priced book to acheive the same same sales ranking.

  • I would think that is unfair. Someone with a $50 book selling a couple of copies would stand to have a better ranking than someone selling more copies at only $10 per book. Shouldn't it go by books sales and not profit? Kind of misleading in my opinion. By using the amount of profit instead of book sales, it misleads the consumer on the actual poputarity of the book.

  • @Shadowmonkey 

    If we used that approach, the best seller lists would only contain free eBook downloads.

    20% of all "purchases" on the Lulu.com site are free eBooks.

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Should it not be listing popularity of books? Regardless if they are free or not?

     

    I would have thought that someone who has had 3,000 free e-books downloaded is more popular than someone who has sold 300 printed books. That's how it works with music charts anyway. Not on how much money a track has earned (only needed to be known by the publisher) but how many people bought it.

    What has been suggested in the UK about music tracks is that those downloaded, in effect for free, from subscription sites should also be counted for use in the music charts.

     

    Right, I am off to create a book for £5,000 and by it myself.  Smiley Very Happy  (As if)

    How Do. Pull up a chair. Would you like a cup of tea? Don't sit in that chair!!
  • I actually know someone who bought 400 copies of a CD he released as soon as it came out and it catapulted straight to the top of the (classical) charts here in Greece. As a result, he sold another 2000 copies over the next week.  I don't know how ethical this is but from one aspect it's an interesting marketing ploy...

     

    I Still don't know how many books make up the difference between 10,000th and 100th place, say, in the rankings.

     

    I'm not grumpy, I just want to know if I'm using this site to my full advantage. Smiley Wink

    FC

  • To me "best sellers" means the book that sold the most copies not how much money it made. You said it depends on the sales but it's actually depends on profit the book made. Someone with a manual type book that sold only a few copies at $50 or so isn't outselling someone's book that sold more copies but made less money. Selling means selling not profit made. I think the way it's done now is kind of misleading. It doesn't mean the book is good or popular just that it made more money. Not that it's hurting me or anything but that is just my opinion. Smiley Happy

     

  • This gets done on Amazon all the time. They put out a release date then everyone goes and buys the book on that day putting it at the top 100 of the rankings. Whether it stays who knows.
  • Skoob_ymSkoob_ym Librarian

    For one day only, I will sell anyone ONE copy of ANY of my books for only $1,000,000 USD.

     

    This is a ONE DAY offer and may not be combined with any other offers! Act NOW, while supplies last!

     

    Smiley Wink

  • oncewasoncewas Publisher

    One thing which no one has mentioned is that Kindle has seperate lists
    for free books and paid books. Therefore,  free books need not dominate
    the paid book list and yes, bestseller lists the world over list the
    number of sales, not the value of sales.

    However, I realized a long time ago that the Lulu bookstore will never
    be what we writers want it to be so best to just ignore it. Keep writing,
    keep striving (even if iBookstore decides they no longer want to list your
    books despite listing loads and loads of books of a similar nature, the porcine
    booksellers who only have 10 to 15 % of the market!) and keep hoping!

  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius

    Special Offer.

     

    Buy one, get another copy for the same price.

    How Do. Pull up a chair. Would you like a cup of tea? Don't sit in that chair!!
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