Do many book buyers click author name in the "cart" page?

Suppose a user is already on the "cart" page of Lulu.com. What is the probability that he clicks author's name on this page?

 

Could I get estimated percent of the total people who (after being on the cart page) click author's name on this page?

 

I ask this because my book "End of Gospel" (with the description "... New Testament terminates itself in the same way as it terminates Old Testament..." may seem heretic and thus distract possible buyers of my other religious book.

 

By the way, does the words "End of Gospel" and "New Testament terminates itself in the same way as it terminates Old Testament." really seem heretic and thus distracting for potential readers?

Comments

  • Don't worry yourself too much; the Lulu marketplace is really teeny, weeny.

    Like seriously miniscule...

     

    Allow distribution to other channels as terms such as 'bible', 'testament', and

    'gospel' do very well.

     

  • Don't worry yourself too much; the Lulu marketplace is really teeny, weeny.

    Like seriously miniscule...

     

    How is it related with being "teeny" and "weeny"? You haven't answered my questions.

     

    Allow distribution to other channels as terms such as 'bible', 'testament', and

    'gospel' do very well.

     

    My marketing plan is to advertise my book on AdWords and other PPC networks. The the "buy" link from my landing page will be directly to the "cart" page on Lulu.com. I don't even going to get ISBNs for my books and don't want them to be on Amazon, as selling through Amazon decreases my profit share. Well, maybe I may be proposed an other marketing strategy?

     

    I wonder if users would click my author name and see my other book. I wonder if this may harm sales of the book presented on above mentioned landing page.

  • You pays your money and you take your chances.

     

    Who knows what people do, or don't do, when on a website? You will certainly get no usable answers here.

     

    I have loads of people downloading my free books. All I can tell you is that it doesn't necessarily lead to loads of sales.

    All I can guess from this is that people do not check what else a writer has published. However, it could also mean

    that people think my stuff is junk, or that those who download free books simply will not ever pay for them.

     

    Unless you are very sucessful at directing traffic to your Lulu page you will be shooting yourself in the foot

    by not publishing on Amazon.

     

    But in answer to your question: unless you have a 'voice' which people find engaging, different, outstanding

    and irreristabe the chances of them clicking your name are pretty slim.

     

    I know this is not what you want to hear but I only deal with the truth.

  • Unless you are very sucessful at directing traffic to your Lulu page you will be shooting yourself in the foot

    by not publishing on Amazon.

     

    Accordingly my preliminary calculations I expect at least 1500 sales per month only with AdWords (not counting other PPC networks, and with worst assumptions about AdWords performance). This is based on the conjecture that my conversion rate will be not less than 1% what seems quite realistic. So I soon most probably fire from my job and become full time writer.

     

    Can Amazon beat this?

  • Good Lord! You are tres ambitious!

     

    I am an author who sold a quarter of a million books when I had a publisher and I struggle to sell a miniscule fraction of that  now.

     

    Come back and tell us how many books you have sold in three month's time. Until then, the best of luck to you. Ad words, my callipygian gluteus maximus!

  • Don't worry yourself too much; the Lulu marketplace is really teeny, weeny.

    Like seriously miniscule...

     

    How is it related with being "teeny" and "weeny"? You haven't answered my questions.

     

    Lulu do not market the site as a book store but as a self-publishing site. I doubt people find the Lulu Spotlights by accident, the self-publishers here drive people to their Spotlights. So in that aspect Lulu's Shop is nonexistent when compared with places like Amazon, who do market their sites as places to buy many things from.

     

    Allow distribution to other channels as terms such as 'bible', 'testament', and

    'gospel' do very well.

     

    I am not sure what that means either. What you need to do is to use Lulu's free ISBN and Dist options to get your book on to Shops like Amazon, where people do go to to buy books, even if they don't know which books they want!

     

    I have my own site with the contents aimed at all the other sites my books are on, even so no one knows that site or the other sites carry my books unless I tell them.

     

    That indirectly answers your question.


  • porton a écrit :

    Suppose a user is already on the "cart" page of Lulu.com. What is the probability that he clicks author's name on this page?

     


     

    I publish books on Lulu, and I also buy books from its store. Frankly I never look first for an author, but launch a search with a key word. If one of the books listed meets my demand, I click on the author's name to have a look at the rest of his / her production.

    On the other hand, from one of my books advertised through Lulu on Facebook, a reader went to my author's profile and discovered another book he was interested in.
    As regards the cart page, having bought a book by a Lulu author, I sometimes return to the store to find other books on the same subject, but I don't click on the author's name.

     

  • As to advertising using often random or even 'smart' content display banners scatted across websites. People see them as an annoying intrusion and I wonder if anyone ever clicks on them.

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