Amazon & Lulu publishing

Hi all, I have my book on Amazon through Lulu in print and kindle. Amazon have a facility for 'lending' e-books or part of the book to readers but only if the book isn't available through any other publisher than KDP. I am wondering if Lulu have any plans for a similar scheme or even approaching Amazon for a 'deal' which allows Lulu e-books on Amazon the same availability. I know this facility is free but there seems to be some evidence that this extra exposure actually generates more sales also. I think both Lulu and Amazon are losing out here...possibly.

Comments

  • Lulu does not advertise on Amazon or Barnes and Noble?

  • Hi all, I have my book on Amazon through Lulu in print and kindle. Amazon have a facility for 'lending' e-books or part of the book to readers but only if the book isn't available through any other publisher than KDP.

     

    Only as an e-book, the rules do not say you cannot sell it as a printed book also.

     

    I am wondering if Lulu have any plans for a similar scheme or even approaching Amazon for a 'deal' which allows Lulu e-books on Amazon the same availability.

     

    I have not looked, but possibly if you open an Author Central account at Amazon you can possibly do it with any e-book you have on Amazon regardless of who places them there. But you would have to remove them from any other place Lulu distributes them from and also from your Lulu Spotlight. I doubt Lulu have such plans. Lulu do not really promote the site as a book store at all.

     

    I know this facility is free but there seems to be some evidence that this extra exposure actually generates more sales also. I think both Lulu and Amazon are losing out here...possibly.

     

    It's not really extra coverage if Amazon demand exclusivity for KDP library books, it's far less coverage.

  • Lulu does not advertise on Amazon or Barnes and Noble?

     

    As what?

  • The whole point about KDP is that Amazon wants exclusivity; they want to be able to say that you can only buy these ebook on Kindle so no, there will never be any chance of a deal with Lulu.

     

    I wouldn't say that Lulu is losing out because it is not an option; Lulu does not have the clout of Amazon nor the pay-per- month subscription service which Kindle has, which funds the scheme you are talking about. As for Amazon losing out that doesn't happen either. They charge people a monthly fee to be able to download books without having to pay for them. The author gets paid a little over a dollar for each 'borrow' but only if the person who downloaded the book reads at least 10 % of it.

     

    I'm not sure how people borrowing a book leads to more sales. If anything, it might lead to them borrowing another one by the same author and if that author has no more available to borrow (i.e. his or her other books are not in the KDP program), simply borrowing a book by a different author, which is.

  • Hello Marquesa

    If your eBook is in GlobalREACH distribution > Kobo and Everywhere Else, it will be available on both Scribd and Oyster books - both are eBook subscription sites. At this time, Amazon is only allowing their own content to be accessed through subscriptions on their sites.

     

    Perhaps once they have perfected the method and pay-scales for this type of service, they will open it up to eBooks published and distributed through other sites.

  • Thanks to all for the replies. I have no intention of making my books available through KDP only and will continue to use Lulu who have been good to me. Lulu just get better all the time, especially on deliveries. Only 36 hours last time from ordering to receiving print copies. Awesome.

  • KDP is actually Kindle Direct Publishing, who do not insist on exclusivity. What does insist on that for e-books is this >>  http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200757120   for which you can register with to have your kindle book on it, for free to the borrower.

    So if you only use KDP and do not register with the Lending Library then Amazon do not have exclusivity. I think it only lasts around a year anyway, then you can remove it from the LL or keep it on for another year.

  • To get 70 % royalties from Amazon Kindle your ebook needs to have a retail price of at least $ 2.99
    but it does not necessarily need to be enrolled in KDP. All you would get is 70 % royalties on sales.

    To get 'borrowing fees' your book needs to be enrolled in KDP. If you enter into the KDP program
    you can publish your print book elsewhere but your ebook is exclusively tied to Amazon Kindle
    for a 90 day renewable period.

    Kevin, I really do wish you would stop giving out incorrect information.

  • If you use Lulu to get your e-book on to Amazon then it's not KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing) being used. Kindle Direct Publishing is just that, publishing direct to Amazon for the Kindle.

    I think the Lending Library option is now part of Amazon Prime.

  • To get 70 % royalties from Amazon Kindle your ebook needs to have a retail price of at least $ 2.99
    but it does not necessarily need to be enrolled in KDP. All you would get is 70 % royalties on sales.

     

    To directly place an e-book as a mobi for Kindle one uses Kindle Direct Publishing. Note the name. You can even read it at the link I gave.

    To get 'borrowing fees' your book needs to be enrolled in KDP.

     

    Only by default because that is the portal to directly place an e-book on to Amazon. I know because I have many e-books placed directly on to Amazon and they do not have exclusivity of any of mine, at the moment.

     

    If you enter into the KDP program you can publish your print book elsewhere but your ebook is exclusively tied to Amazon Kindle
    for a 90 day renewable period.

     

    Not at all true. I use both Lulu and Amazon for the very same books. Epubs and printed books via Lulu and mobis via Amazon's KDP. The same books. Click my banner to see.

    It is the LENDING LIBRARY option for Kindle books that is an option for KDP, for which you allow people to borrow your book/s and Amazon have a pot of money they share out to lenders. To use that option then Amazon ask for exclusivity of e-books, but not printed books.

    I don't recall the exact period, but I did actually read all about it, when I tested it ...

    Kevin, I really do wish you would stop giving out incorrect information.

     

    It's far from it. I have used it and still do. Perhaps you should.   Here's a section from The KDP page >>  "Enroll in KDP Select and earn more money through Kindle Unlimited and the Kindle Owners' Lending Library. " They are options.

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