Shameless Promotion...and making a good impression

I suppose it would be indiscrete to mention names since the person inspiring this post didn't ask for advice...but once again I've seen a description of a new book in which the author didn't take care to make sure that spelling, punctuation and grammar were correct.

 

The blurb you create for your book is the first example anyone will ever see of your writing. It's important to make sure it is letter-perfect. It's no different than making sure you're well-groomed and neatly dressed when going to a job interview: first impressions can make all the difference. Someone seeing a poorly written description has every right to wonder: "If this author can't take enough care to make sure that three or four sentences about their book are written carefully, how good can the book itself be?"

 

I believe that half the time this problem could be solved if the author were to simply re-read what they've written before posting. 

Comments

  • I suppose it would be indiscrete to mention names since the person inspiring this post didn't ask for advice...

     

    Indeed. If Ken was still around he would have something to say about doing that ... 

     

    but once again I've seen a description of a new book in which the author didn't take care to make sure that spelling, punctuation and grammar were correct.

     

    I honestly think they do not notice, that is how they write.

     

    The blurb you create for your book is the first example anyone will ever see of your writing. It's important to make sure it is letter-perfect. It's no different than making sure you're well-groomed and neatly dressed when going to a job interview: first impressions can make all the difference. Someone seeing a poorly written description has every right to wonder: "If this author can't take enough care to make sure that three or four sentences about their book are written carefully, how good can the book itself be?"

     

    There is in fact a spell-checker in these replies. Few use it, but even I do at times! Not sure if there is one in Shameless, but it's little extra effort to type the text in Word or whatever, and let it check spelling, then paste it to Shameless.

     

    I believe that half the time this problem could be solved if the author were to simply re-read what they've written before posting.

     

    This will fall on deaf ears again Ron. The rare few who use Shameless who do also bother to ever visit the forums only do so to also advertise their book in it, but never reply to any comments. They just want people to read the posting, not to reply.

    It is a worry, though, and what still gives self-publishers a bad name. It was not as bad when people had to pay to be published, and even then they never also got an ISBN and distribution, so they only creatures to see their book was the spiders in their lofts.


  •  

    There is in fact a spell-checker in these replies. Few use it, but even I do at times! Not sure if there is one in Shameless, but it's little extra effort to type the text in Word or whatever, and let it check spelling, then paste it to Shameless.

     

     


    There is a spell checker in Shameless and it is as good as, if not better than Word but you have to take the effort to activate it.  Like being an alcoholic, you first have to acknowledge you have a problem before you can learn to help yourself.  My name is Chris and I have the spelling ability of a blind, arthritic monkey with a typewriter and it has been two weeks since my last spelling mistake.  Move mouse to [ABC], click. There, that didn't hurt did it?  You too can learn to be error free.  Just take it one paragraph at a time.
  •  

    but once again I've seen a description of a new book in which the author didn't take care to make sure that spelling, punctuation and grammar were correct.

     

    I honestly think they do not notice, that is how they write.

     

    Indeed...which only underscores the need to have someone objectively vet their texts.

     

    The blurb you create for your book is the first example anyone will ever see of your writing. It's important to make sure it is letter-perfect. It's no different than making sure you're well-groomed and neatly dressed when going to a job interview: first impressions can make all the difference. Someone seeing a poorly written description has every right to wonder: "If this author can't take enough care to make sure that three or four sentences about their book are written carefully, how good can the book itself be?"

     

    There is in fact a spell-checker in these replies. Few use it, but even I do at times! Not sure if there is one in Shameless, but it's little extra effort to type the text in Word or whatever, and let it check spelling, then paste it to Shameless.

     

    Spellcheck should neither be a crutch nor an excuse to make sure that words and grammar are correct.

     

    I believe that half the time this problem could be solved if the author were to simply re-read what they've written before posting.

     

    This will fall on deaf ears again Ron.

     

    Goodness knows I realize that! But I have to make the effort, otherwise I abdicate my right to complain.

     

    The rare few who use Shameless who do also bother to ever visit the forums only do so to also advertise their book in it, but never reply to any comments. They just want people to read the posting, not to reply.

    It is a worry, though, and what still gives self-publishers a bad name. It was not as bad when people had to pay to be published, and even then they never also got an ISBN and distribution, so they only creatures to see their book was the spiders in their lofts.

     

    It's still not terribly different from the old Vantage Press days, sadly enough.


     

  • but once again I've seen a description of a new book in which the author didn't take care to make sure that spelling, punctuation and grammar were correct.

     

    I honestly think they do not notice, that is how they write.

     

    Indeed...which only underscores the need to have someone objectively vet their texts.

     

    But if they have no idea that they are semi-illiterate (and everyone they know is also so) how do they know they need to? Many of these people don't even read anything to take as an example.

     

    The blurb you create for your book is the first example anyone will ever see of your writing. It's important to make sure it is letter-perfect. It's no different than making sure you're well-groomed and neatly dressed when going to a job interview: first impressions can make all the difference. Someone seeing a poorly written description has every right to wonder: "If this author can't take enough care to make sure that three or four sentences about their book are written carefully, how good can the book itself be?"

     

    There is in fact a spell-checker in these replies. Few use it, but even I do at times! Not sure if there is one in Shameless, but it's little extra effort to type the text in Word or whatever, and let it check spelling, then paste it to Shameless.

     

    Spellcheck should neither be a crutch nor an excuse to make sure that words and grammar are correct.

     

    Indeed not, but a spell-checker  (  Smiley Happy ) is a help when a redline appears under a word suggesting one finds out why that red line is there.

     

    I believe that half the time this problem could be solved if the author were to simply re-read what they've written before posting.

     

    This will fall on deaf ears again Ron.

     

    Goodness knows I realize that! But I have to make the effort, otherwise I abdicate my right to complain.

     

    Aye. It can make one feel good.

     

    The rare few who use Shameless who do also bother to ever visit the forums only do so to also advertise their book in it, but never reply to any comments. They just want people to read the posting, not to reply.

    It is a worry, though, and what still gives self-publishers a bad name. It was not as bad when people had to pay to be published, and even then they never also got an ISBN and distribution, so they only creatures to see their book was the spiders in their lofts.

     

    It's still not terribly different from the old Vantage Press days, sadly enough.

     

    Yup. "Have you written a book?"  You still see such adverts in the press.

  • If only readers were as brave as writers!!!

  • Hello Ron

    I agree. I think part of the problem is new authors have not considered and are therefore not prepared when the description step is reached in the publishing wizard. Since this is a required field, something has to be entered. Perhaps we should build in an automatic email reminder a few days after a book is published for authors to re-visit their product pages to review and update the information on the page.

     

     

  • Or fit an auto spell-checker? I can see it in action now. Entire blurbs red underlined. Smiley Surprised

Sign In or Register to comment.