Beneath the Bamboo: A Vietnam War Story

Available on both Lulu as well as Amazon.com at:

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00APSQ5CO

 

For those of us who grew up in the 60s or 70s, many of our fathers had been drafted into the Vietnam War during the mid to late 60s. Some of them were lucky enough to come back, and some, unfortunately, were not. My Dad, who obviously must have found an entire field of four-leaf clovers when he was younger, relayed his surprising life story in print, which covered his overly rocky childhood right up until he arrived home safe and sound from Vietnam.

 

As a side note, it contains violence, of course, as well as occasional “language”, so this should be considered for mature readers only. Truthfully, after hearing about what he went through, I fully understand now how important it is to release this book. Most history books don’t really give people, especially the youth of today, information on what was really going on over there and what people had to do in order to survive. Therefore, for most, I feel that this will be quite eye-opening since it contains a lot of situations that many veterans simply won’t talk about.

We appreciate your support, and if you buy it and like it, please, feel free to leave positive feedback. Thanks!

Sincerely,
Jonathon Jones

Comments

  • Jonathon, I didn't read much of your book's preview, because I don't like wars, but I know that the Vietnam war left scars on American soldiers unlike any war (according to many current, living survivors).  Most people who could relate to your father's experiences would be war veterans and survivors, but I'd think it would open up painful wounds in its readers.  Have you done any research on how to write a story in a way that will not traumatize Vietnam veterans (survivors)?  Many of these individuals still have a hard time even talking about their experiences; those who can speak about the experiences (without breaking down or being sent  into post-traumatic stress syndrome) have received years of therapy and some are still in therapy.  

    These men have suffer so much, so they'd need to be able to read this book and not be tramatized, because you state that there is violence in the book; some of the veterans will have to relive that painful experience, after reading your book.

    I've always said and believe that an author's targeted audience is people who have either lived the experience, who dream of having the experience or who really like the topic of the book.  

  • I only see the amazon link and I couldn't locate a preview option.

  • Impressive.

    You should be proud, not just of your father, but of the fact that you've produced not only what looks from the preview to be a good book, but also a potentially important social and historical document. I think it's so important that records such as this are made and saved for the future.

    And if it contains violence and "language" then so be it. Anyrthing else would be a dishonest account of what happened.

    I wish you every success with your book.

  • F_ray, you'll need to click on the eBook cover (after you click the link provided by the author of this post); the eBook preview will then open up for you to view and read the contents therein.

    Happy Reading!

  • Wow, it certainly was awesome of Lulu to inform me that I had responses to this.  I must not have checked the email option.  Anyway, for those who had responded, first I wanted to say thank you for taking the time to read my post.  Secondly, as for how I wrote this, I wanted to be as thorough as possible and tell it like my father has told it to me.  I have basically been hearing bits and pieces of this story since I was right around the age of eight, and when I turned 41 (I'm the second born, not the baby that was briefly mentioned in the book) I realized that, with my dad now an official senior citizen, it was probably best to get a record of his amazing story out there before he is gone one day.

    Although, as a writer, it was of course my option to turn this into some kind of narrow-focused all-action war story like a lot of people try to do when they write books on Vietnam, that was truly, from both my dad's story and many others I have read on the net, not what Vietnam seemed to be about.  Although some people on the front lines between the North and South border did see some WW1 and 2 like scenarios, if I may quote Forrest Gump for a moment, "And we were always lookin' for this guy named Charlie" is what a lot of the time in Vietnam was usually spent doing.

    For many soldiers back then, my father included, it was a 1/3rd situation.  What I mean is, 1/3rd of the time looking for the enemy, 1/3rd of the time fighting the enemy, and 1/3rd of the time doing nothing and just waiting and getting to know your fellow soldiers until you started looking again.

    So I decided to be true to that.  In addition, as with any real story, you can't get to know the main character unless you truly know where they came from and what their life was like before they entered their new adventure.  This is why I knew it was imperative to show his transformation from early childhood onwards as opposed to just what he was like when he entered Vietnam.  Although some people may not have liked the beginning since it didn't take them to instant action-land, this wasn't just a war story...this was my dad's entire life.  I am under the firm belief that you can't really relate to a character and feel like you're right there with them and understand them as human beings unless you know some of their background.

    As for the person who questioned if I took into consideration the pain it might bring some who went through that, from all of the psychological research I have done, one of the very last steps in the healing process is being able to talk about it.  For my Dad, as he was writing all of his notes down, yes, occasionally he did break down.  But once his story was out there and he got it all out, he felt 100% better for doing this.  If a person isn't over Vietnam and can't talk about it, they most certainly, at least in my opinion, wouldn't be looking for a book based on it.  Those people still have a long ways to go to heal.  But those who have went through all of the steps and are ready to move on with their lives, I truly do think going back one last time, especially through someone else's eyes, might actually help them much more so than hurt.

    Each person who went through that experience learned one lesson or another, and my father is no different.  So, from the words of the father to the child, I knew this story had to be told.  It is no longer on Lulu directly since I really do not like the idea that it no longer has DRM protection in order to protect our work, but it is available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble for purchase.  For those who have bought it or are thinking about purchasing it, my Dad and I truly do appreciate your support.

     

    Amazon:

    http://www.amazon.com/Beneath-Bamboo-Vietnam-Story-ebook/dp/B00APSQ5CO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1359188454&sr=8-1&keywords=beneath+the+bamboo

     

    Barnes and Noble:

    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/beneath-the-bamboo-jonathon-jones/1113994063?ean=2940016106809

     

     

     

     

  • As for the person who questioned if I took into consideration the pain it might bring some who went through that,

    A person who does not like war stories ...

    But wars happen and no one has to buy the book unless they want to, but some of the biggest box-office hits (with Oscars too) over the last few decades, have been films showing the horror of war during and after.

    War stories have always been popular. One is even now a film due to it's success as a play, even though it's a musical! The clue to war is in the title - Miserable.

  • It's a bit strange editing a posting from ‎20-12-2012


  • kevinlomas wrote:

    As for the person who questioned if I took into consideration the pain it might bring some who went through that,

    A person who does not like war stories ...

    But wars happen and no one has to buy the book unless they want to, but some of the biggest box-office hits (with Oscars too) over the last few decades, have been films showing the horror of war during and after.

    War stories have always been popular. One is even now a film due to it's success as a play, even though it's a musical! The clue to war is in the title - Miserable.


    Hmm...:Les Misérables is hardly a war story. The title refers to the crushing social injustices endured by Hugo's main characters, which is the main theme  of the novel. The only "war" in the book, play or film is the depiction of the barricades erected during the insurrection of 1832, which occurs near the end of the story.

  • A late reply is better than none  Smiley Happy

     

    There's a few definitions of War. I meant the general idea.

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