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"inside" bleed or not??

I have a question about how to export my indesign-document (it's an A5 document, 145 pages, paperback, with bleed). In Indesign, I designed the document with facing pages / spreads.

When I export my document as pointed out in here: http://connect.lulu.com/t5/De-Opmaak-van-de-Binnenkant/Hoe-maak-ik-een-PDF-in-Indesign-met-Full-Bleed/ta-p/98899 (that is: with bleed on all 4 sides of the pages). That results in single pages with bleed on all 4 sides. 

Is that really how it should be?? When images touch the spine of the spread, they appear in the bleed of the facing page. (Or is this a change in Indesign? I use Indesign CS4 on a Mac)

I always assumed that there was no need of a bleed on the "inside"-side of the pages? In the past I had documents printed without inside-bleed, and that turned out just great.

 

So... my question is... should I set my export-bleed settings like this:

bleed = top 0.125 inch; bottom 0.125 inch; inside 0.125 inch; outside 0.125 inch;

or like this:

bleed = top 0.125 inch; bottom 0.125 inch; inside 0; outside 0.125 inch;

Comments

  • With InDesign facing pages, No.
  • So: i have to do it like this:

     

    bleed = top 0.125 inch; bottom 0.125 inch; inside 0; outside 0.125 inch?

  • Hmm I'm also in this bleeding situation. So what did you end up doing at the end? To inside bleed or not to inside bleed? That's the question.

  • I would also like to know how this turned out. The first answer "no" doesn't really answer the question. "No" what?
  • For bleed you need the dimensions to be uniform on all sides. This means 0.125" on all four sides is added. We'll trim to size, then bind. If you skip adding the bleed on any side, we'll either be forced to add it on our end or we'll reject the file.

    I also updated this article with some details. It includes a link to Adobe's InDesign instructions too.
  • daphnecatdaphnecat Reader
    If the file is correctly set up as facing pages, there is no bleed on the gutter edge.
  • Just KevinJust Kevin Lulu Genius
    I do believe this very old thread is people wanting to know how to achieve bleed to the edges. For a picture that covers two pages, for example.

    Myself and my friend combined know everything there is to know, but he's not here.

  • daphnecat said:
    If the file is correctly set up as facing pages, there is no bleed on the gutter edge.
    While this is true, Lulu prints page-by-page, not spreads. Because we use this method, bleed is necessary on all pages, and for a set of pages that do need a spread, we recommend using overlap settings to best achieve a continuous image.
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